Elon Galusha

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Elon Galusha in 1840 in London

Elon Galusha (June 18, 1790 – January 6, 1856) was a lawyer and Baptist preacher who was active in reform activities of the early 19th century in New York. He was the son of Jonas Galusha, the 6th and 8th governor of Vermont. He also adopted and promoted the teachings of William Miller.

Biography[edit]

Galusha was born June 18, 1790 in Shaftsbury, Vermont.[1] His father was Jonas Galusha, the governor of Vermont. Galusha received an M. A. from the University of Vermont in 1816, and an M. A. from Brown University in 1820, though he never took a college course.[1]

Galusha died January 6, 1856 in Lockport, New York.[2]

Abolitionist activities[edit]

Isaac Crewdson (Beaconite) writer Samuel Jackman Prescod - Barbadian Journalist William Morgan from Birmingham William Forster - Quaker leader George Stacey - Quaker leader William Forster - Anti-Slavery ambassador John Burnet -Abolitionist Speaker William Knibb -Missionary to Jamaica Joseph Ketley from Guyana George Thompson - UK & US abolitionist J. Harfield Tredgold - British South African (secretary) Josiah Forster - Quaker leader Samuel Gurney - the Banker's Banker Sir John Eardley-Wilmot Dr Stephen Lushington - MP and Judge Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton James Gillespie Birney - American John Beaumont George Bradburn - Massachusetts politician George William Alexander - Banker and Treasurer B. Godwin Vice Admiral Moorson William Taylor William Taylor John Morrison GK Prince Josiah Conder Joseph Soul James Dean (abolitionist) John Keep - Ohio fund raiser Joseph Eaton Joseph Sturge - Organiser from Birmingham James Whitehorne Joseph Marriage George Bennett Richard Allen Stafford Allen William Leatham, banker William Beaumont Sir Edward Baines - Journalist Samuel Lucas Francis August Cox Abraham Beaumont Samuel Fox, Nottingham grocer Louis Celeste Lecesne Jonathan Backhouse Samuel Bowly William Dawes - Ohio fund raiser Robert Kaye Greville - Botanist Joseph Pease, railway pioneer W.T.Blair M.M. Isambert (sic) Mary Clarkson -Thomas Clarkson's daughter in law William Tatum Saxe Bannister - Pamphleteer Richard Davis Webb - Irish Nathaniel Colver - American not known John Cropper - Most generous Liverpudlian Thomas Scales William James William Wilson Thomas Swan Edward Steane William Brock Edward Baldwin Jonathon Miller Capt. Charles Stuart from Jamaica Sir John Jeremie - Judge Charles Stovel - Baptist Richard Peek, ex-Sheriff of London John Sturge Elon Galusha Cyrus Pitt Grosvenor Rev. Isaac Bass Henry Sterry Peter Clare -; sec. of Literary & Phil. Soc. Manchester J.H. Johnson Thomas Price Joseph Reynolds Samuel Wheeler William Boultbee Daniel O'Connell - "The Liberator" William Fairbank John Woodmark William Smeal from Glasgow James Carlile - Irish Minister and educationalist Rev. Dr. Thomas Binney Edward Barrett - Freed slave John Howard Hinton - Baptist minister John Angell James - clergyman Joseph Cooper Dr. Richard Robert Madden - Irish Thomas Bulley Isaac Hodgson Edward Smith Sir John Bowring - diplomat and linguist John Ellis C. Edwards Lester - American writer Tapper Cadbury - Businessman not known Thomas Pinches David Turnbull - Cuban link Edward Adey Richard Barrett John Steer Henry Tuckett James Mott - American on honeymoon Robert Forster (brother of William and Josiah) Richard Rathbone John Birt Wendell Phillips - American M. L'Instant from Haiti Henry Stanton - American Prof William Adam Mrs Elizabeth Tredgold - British South African T.M. McDonnell Mrs John Beaumont Anne Knight - Feminist Elizabeth Pease - Suffragist Jacob Post - Religious writer Anne Isabella, Lady Byron - mathematician and estranged wife Amelia Opie - Novelist and poet Mrs Rawson - Sheffield campaigner Thomas Clarkson's grandson Thomas Clarkson Thomas Morgan Thomas Clarkson - main speaker George Head Head - Banker from Carlisle William Allen John Scoble Henry Beckford - emancipated slave and abolitionist Use your cursor to explore (or Click "i" to enlarge)
Galusha is in the centre of the right front group third row back in this painting which shows him at the 1840 Anti-Slavery Convention.[3] Move your cursor to identify Galusha or click icon to enlarge

Galusha took a firm stance against slavery. He served as the first president of the Baptist Anti-Slavery Society.[4] He promoted the Liberty Party and preached about the evils of slavery.[5] Following His withdrawal from the Baptist denomination, he hosted abolitionist meetings at his church in Lockport.[6]

Millerite connection[edit]

Galusha leaned toward a premillennial understanding of Bible prophecy. After personal deliberation, and having read William Miller's Lectures, Galusha joined the Millerite movement wholeheartedly under the influence of a fellow preacher, Nathaniel N. Whiting.[7]

Galusha served as president of the Albany Conference on April 29, 1845, following the Great Disappointment.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b William B. Sprague, Annals of the American Pulpit, or, Commemorative notices of distinguished American clergymen of various denominations : from the early settlement of the country to the close of the year eighteen hundred and fifty-five : with historical introductions, vol. 6 (Baptist) (New York : R. Carter and Brothers, 1860), p. 669
  2. ^ William Cathcart, The Baptist Encyclopedia, vol. 1 (Paris, AK: The Baptist Standard Bearer, Inc., 2001), p. 432
  3. ^ The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840, Benjamin Robert Haydon, 1841, National Portrait Gallery, London, NPG599, Given by British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society in 1880
  4. ^ Grosvenor, Cyrus Pitt, Richard Fuller, and Elon Galusha. Baptist Anti-Slavery Correspondent. Worcester, Mass: Executive Committee of the American Baptist Anti-Slavery Convention, 1841. p. 2
  5. ^ Douglas M. Strong, Perfectionist Politics: Abolitionism and the Religious Tensions of American Democracy, (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2001), p. 111
  6. ^ Douglas M. Strong, Perfectionist Politics: Abolitionism and the Religious Tensions of American Democracy, (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2001), p. 113
  7. ^ Elon Galusha, Address, of Elder Elon Galusha, with Reasons for Believing Christ’s Second Coming, at Hand (Rochester: Erastus Shepard, 1844) p. 4
  8. ^ Isaac Wellcome, History of the Second Advent Message and Mission, Doctrine and People, (Yarmouth, ME:I. C. Wellcome, 1874), p. 415

External links[edit]

Grosvenor, Cyrus Pitt, Richard Fuller, and Elon Galusha. Baptist Anti-Slavery Correspondent. Worcester, Mass: Executive Committee of the American Baptist Anti-Slavery Convention, 1841. [1]

Elon Galusha, Address, of Elder Elon Galusha, with Reasons for Believing Christ’s Second Coming, at Hand. Rochester: Erastus Shepard, 1844. [2]