FIS Alpine Ski World Cup

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For the current Alpine Ski World Cup, see 2015 Alpine Skiing World Cup.
Lindsey Vonn in 2010 with 8 crystal globes, including 3 for FIS World Cup overall titles and 5 for various discipline titles. Her total through 2002–2013 is 17 globes.
Since its introduction in 1967, FIS Alpine Ski World Cup events have been hosted by 25 different countries from five continents.

The FIS Alpine Ski World Cup is the top international circuit of alpine skiing competitions, launched in 1966 by a group of ski racing friends and experts which included French journalist Serge Lang and the alpine ski team directors from France (Honore Bonnet) and the USA (Bob Beattie).[1] It was soon backed by International Ski Federation (FIS) president Marc Hodler during the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1966 at Portillo, Chile, and became an official FIS event in the spring of 1967 after the FIS Congress at Beirut, Lebanon. The first World Cup ski race was held in Berchtesgaden, West Germany, on January 5, 1967. Jean-Claude Killy of France and Nancy Greene of Canada were the overall winners for the first two seasons.

Competitors attempt to achieve the best time in four disciplines: slalom, giant slalom, Super G, and downhill. The fifth event, the combined, employs the downhill and slalom. The World Cup originally included only slalom, giant slalom, and downhill races. Combined events (calculated using results from selected downhill and slalom races) were included starting with the 1974–75 season, while the Super G was added for the 1982–83 season. The current scoring system was implemented in the 1991–92 season. For every race points are awarded to the top 30 finishers: 100 points to the winner, 80 for second, 60 for third, winding down to 1 point for 30th place. The racer with the most points at the end of the season in mid-March wins the Cup, with the trophy consisting of a 9 kilogram crystal globe.[2] Sub-prizes are also awarded in each individual race discipline, with a smaller 3.5 kg crystal globe. (See the section on scoring system below for more information.)

The World Cup is held annually, and is considered the premier competition for alpine ski racing after the quadrennial Winter Olympics. Many consider the World Cup to be a more valuable title than the Olympics or the biennial World Championships, since it requires a competitor to ski at an extremely high level in several disciplines throughout the season, and not just in one race.[3]

Races are hosted primarily at ski resorts in the Alps in Europe, with regular stops in Scandinavia, North America, and east Asia, but a few races have also been held in the Southern Hemisphere. World Cup competitions have been hosted in 25 different countries around the world: Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bosnia, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States.[4] (Note that all World Cup races hosted at ski resorts in Bosnia and Slovakia were held when those countries were still part of Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia respectively.)

Lower competitive circuits include the NorAm Cup in North America and the Europa Cup in Europe.

Crystal globe[edit]

Since 1967 big crystal globe is awarded for overall title. From beginning to 1976-77 discipline titles were awarded with medals. In statistics those titles has the same value as small crystal globe.

For the first time small crystal globe for discipline titles in slalom, giant slalom and downhill appeared in 1977-78.

In the super-G small crystal globe is awarded since 1985-86. For super-g races in previous three seasons points were added and calculated in giant slalom ranking.

In combined small crystal globe was officially awarded only between 2007-2012. Before that combined season winners cannot officially be considered as season titles. In those years FIS simply calculated points from other two races, DH and SL.

Super Ranking[edit]

Best skiers of all-time in overall and each discipline based on ski-database ranking system (counting since 1966). This is a scoring system calculating points together from four categories: World Cup (overall and discipline titles and individual races), OG, SWC.

Men[edit]

All-time
ranking
Overall Downhill Super-G Giant Slalom Slalom
Name Points Name Points Name Points Name Points Name Points
1 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 290.01 Austria Franz Klammer 76.3 Austria Hermann Maier 88.2 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 120.0 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 124.8
2 Austria Hermann Maier 252.01 Switzerland Peter Müller 66.0 Norway Kjetil André Aamodt 68.9 United States Ted Ligety 85.2 Italy Alberto Tomba 98.5
3 Luxembourg Marc Girardelli 227.54 Switzerland Bernhard Russi 54.5 Norway Aksel Lund Svindal 60.5 Italy Alberto Tomba 80.9 Austria Benjamin Raich 69.6
4 Switzerland Pirmin Zurbriggen 216.10 Austria Michael Walchhofer 53.6 Austria Stephan Eberharter 47.6 Switzerland Michael von Grünigen 73.7 Austria Mario Matt 55.7
5 Norway Kjetil André Aamodt 201.29 Switzerland Pirmin Zurbriggen 51.4 Switzerland Pirmin Zurbriggen 45.9 Austria Hermann Maier 59.8 Luxembourg Marc Girardelli 52.8
6 Italy Alberto Tomba 195.60 Switzerland Didier Cuche 49.8 United States Bode Miller 38.4 Austria Benjamin Raich 56.5 Croatia Ivica Kostelić 49.9
7 Norway Aksel Lund Svindal 189.45 Switzerland Franz Heinzer 48.9 Switzerland Didier Cuche 33.6 Italy Gustav Thöni 55.0 Italy Gustav Thöni 47.0
8 United States Bode Miller 176.11 Norway Aksel Lund Svindal 45.5 Germany Markus Wasmeier 31.4 Switzerland Pirmin Zurbriggen 38.5 Austria Thomas Stangassinger 46.4
9 Italy Gustav Thöni 173.68 Austria Stephan Eberharter 43.5 Norway Atle Skaardal 25.9 United States Bode Miller 33.3 Austria Marcel Hirscher 42.6
10 Austria Benjamin Raich 172.92 Austria Hermann Maier 43.0 Luxembourg Marc Girardelli 22.4 France Jean-Claude Killy 32.5 United States Phil Mahre 41.2

Women[edit]

All-time
ranking
Overall Downhill Super-G Giant Slalom Slalom
Name Points Name Points Name Points Name Points Name Points
1 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 272.76 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 115.4 Germany Katja Seizinger 60.3 Switzerland Vreni Schneider 87.5 Switzerland Vreni Schneider 110.3
2 Switzerland Vreni Schneider 255.16 United States Lindsey Vonn 95.1 United States Lindsey Vonn 59.8 Italy Deborah Compagnoni 70.0 Austria Marlies Schild 90.5
3 United States Lindsey Vonn 246.81 Austria Renate Götschl 78.6 Austria Michaela Dorfmeister 57.8 Slovenia Tina Maze 59.2 Switzerland Erika Hess 72.8
4 Sweden Anja Pärson 217.20 Germany Katja Seizinger 76.0 Austria Renate Götschl 47.2 Sweden Anja Pärson 57.6 Croatia Janica Kostelić 71.2
5 Croatia Janica Kostelić 202.27 Switzerland Michela Figini 68.0 France Carole Merle 43.0 Austria Anita Wachter 47.6 Sweden Anja Pärson 57.5
6 Germany Katja Seizinger 194.15 Switzerland Maria Walliser 55.4 Austria Alexandra Meissnitzer 34.4 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 45.5 Liechtenstein Hanni Wenzel 51.0
7 Germany Maria Höfl-Riesch 164.77 Austria Michaela Dorfmeister 51.4 Italy Isolde Kostner 30.1 Liechtenstein Hanni Wenzel 44.7 Germany Maria Höfl-Riesch 49.0
8 Austria Renate Götschl 159.98 Switzerland Marie Therese Nadig 48.9 Germany Hilde Gerg 28.6 Switzerland Sonja Nef 40.8 United States Mikaela Shiffrin 43.5
9 Switzerland Erika Hess 152.62 Italy Isolde Kostner 40.9 Slovenia Tina Maze 25.6 Germany Viktoria Rebensburg 40.6 France Marielle Goitschel 43.3
10 Liechtenstein Hanni Wenzel 150.50 United States Picabo Street 36.9 Sweden Anja Pärson 23.8 Germany Martina Ertl 37.7 France Perrine Pelen 42.1

Multi winners[edit]

Calendar[edit]

Individual events[edit]

Last updated: 16 March 2014

Season   Men   Ladies
DH SG GS SL KB P Total DH SG GS SL KB P Total
1967 5 x 5 7 x x 17 4 x 6 7 x x 17
1968 5 x 7 8 x x 20 6 x 7 10 x x 23
1969 6 x 7 9 x x 22 4 x 7 9 x x 20
1970 6 x 11 11 x x 28 5 x 9 12 x x 26
1971 7 x 8 9 x x 24 6 x 8 9 x x 23
1972 7 x 7 7 x x 21 7 x 7 7 x x 21
1973 8 x 8 8 x x 24 8 x 8 8 x x 24
1974 7 x 7 7 x x 21 5 x 6 6 x x 17
1975 9 x 7 7 3 1 27 8 x 7 7 3 1 26
1976 8 x 7 7 3 x 25 7 x 8 8 3 x 26
1977 10 x 10 10 3 x 33 8 x 8 8 3 x 27
1978 8 x 7 7 x x 22 7 x 8 7 x x 22
1979 9 x 10 10 4 x 33 7 x 7 8 4 x 26
1980 7 x 8 8 4 x 27 7 x 8 9 4 x 28
1981 10 x 11 10 5 x 36 10 x 9 9 5 x 33
1982 10 x 9 9 5 x 33 8 x 9 10 4 x 31
1983 11 3 7 11 5 x 37 8 2 7 9 4 x 30
1984 10 4 8 10 5 x 37 8 2 7 11 6 x 34
1985 10 5 6 10 5 x 36 8 4 7 10 4 x 33
1986 13 5 7 13 7 x 45 10 5 8 9 5 x 37
1987 11 5 8 8 2 x 34 7 5 8 10 1 x 31
1988 10 4 6 8 2 x 30 8 4 6 8 2 x 28
1989 10 4 6 8 3 x 31 8 4 7 7 2 x 28
1990 9 6 7 10 2 x 34 8 6 8 9 2 x 33
1991 8 3 7 9 1 x 28 9 5 6 7 2 x 29
1992 9 6 7 9 3 x 34 7 6 7 8 2 x 30
1993 10 7 6 8 3 x 34 9 6 7 8 2 x 32
1994 11 5 9 8 2 x 35 7 6 9 10 2 x 34
1995 9 5 7 9 2 x 32 9 7 8 7 1 x 32
1996 9 6 9 9 2 x 35 9 7 7 10 1 x 34
1997 11 6 8 10 2 x 37 8 7 7 9 1 x 32
1998 11 5 9 9 2 1 37 6 6 8 9 2 2 33
1999 10 6 8 9 2 x 35 9 8 9 8 2 x 36
2000 11 7 9 11 2 x 40 10 8 11 10 1 x 40
2001 9 5 9 9 1 x 33 8 8 8 9 1 x 34
2002 10 6 8 9 2 x 35 9 5 9 9 2 x 34
2003 11 6 8 10 2 x 37 6 8 9 9 1 x 33
2004 12 7 7 11 2 x 39 9 8 8 10 x x 35
2005 11 7 8 9 1 x 36 8 8 8 8 1 x 33
2006 9 6 8 10 4 x 37 8 8 9 9 2 x 36
2007 11 5 6 10 4 x 36 9 7 7 9 3 x 35
2008 9 7 8 11 5 x 40 9 7 7 9 3 x 35
2009 9 5 8 10 4 x 36 7 7 8 9 3 x 34
2010 8 6 7 9 4 x 34 8 7 7 8 2 x 32
2011 9 6 6 10 4 1 36 8 6 6 9 3 1 33
2012 11 8 9 11 4 1 44 8 7 9 10 2 1 37
2013 8 5 8 9 2 2 34 7 6 9 9 2 2 35
2014 9 6 8 9 2 x 34 9 6 8 8 1 x 32
Individual
events
441 177 371 440 120 6 1555 368 196 371 418 94 7 1454
Double wins 3 4 1 2 x x 10 3 3 2 4 x x 12
Triple wins x x x x x x x x 1 1 x x x 2
All winners 444 181 372 442 120 6 1565 371 201 375 422 94 7 1470
  • Note: Only parallel events from (1975, 1997, 2011-2013) which count for overall ranking, included on this list, are considered as official individual World Cup victories.

Overall winners[edit]

Multiple individual overall World Cup winners are marked with (#). For a complete list of winners in each discipline, see Alpine Skiing World Cup Men and Alpine Skiing World Cup Women.

Most overall World Cup titles[edit]

The following skiers have at least three overall alpine World Cup titles.

Most discipline World Cup titles[edit]

Combined titles counted from 2007-2012 when crystal globe was awarded. The records for most World Cup titles in each discipline are as follows:

Discipline Men Women
Name Country Titles Name Country Titles
Downhill Franz Klammer  Austria 5 Annemarie Moser-Pröll  Austria 7
Super G Hermann Maier
Aksel Lund Svindal
 Austria
 Norway
5 Katja Seizinger  Germany 5
Giant Slalom Ingemar Stenmark  Sweden 8 Vreni Schneider  Switzerland 5
Slalom Ingemar Stenmark  Sweden 8 Vreni Schneider  Switzerland 6
Combined Ivica Kostelić  Croatia 3 Lindsey Vonn  United States 3

For a complete list of winners in each discipline, see Alpine Skiing World Cup Men and Alpine Skiing World Cup Women.

Most World Cup wins in each discipline[edit]

The records for most World Cup wins in each discipline are as follows (March 8, 2014):

Discipline Men (Top 3) Women (Top 3)
Name Country Wins Name Country Wins
Downhill Franz Klammer
Peter Müller
Stephan Eberharter
 Austria
 Switzerland
 Austria
25
19
18
Annemarie Moser-Pröll
Lindsey Vonn
Renate Götschl
 Austria
 United States
 Austria
36
29
24
Super G Hermann Maier
Aksel Lund Svindal
Pirmin Zurbriggen
 Austria
 Norway
 Switzerland
24
12
10
Lindsey Vonn
Renate Götschl
Katja Seizinger
 United States
 Austria
 Germany
20
17
16
Giant Slalom Ingemar Stenmark
Michael von Grünigen
Ted Ligety
 Sweden
 Switzerland
 United States
46
23
22
Vreni Schneider
Annemarie Moser-Pröll
Anita Wachter
Lise-Marie Morerod
 Switzerland
 Austria
 Austria
 Switzerland
20
16
14
14
Slalom Ingemar Stenmark
Alberto Tomba
Marc Girardelli
 Sweden
 Italy
 Luxembourg
40
35
16
Marlies Schild
Vreni Schneider
Erika Hess
 Austria
 Switzerland
 Switzerland
35
34
21
Combined Marc Girardelli
Pirmin Zurbriggen
Phil Mahre
 Luxembourg
 Switzerland
 United States
11
11
11
Hanni Wenzel
Annemarie Moser-Pröll
Brigitte Oertli
 Liechtenstein
 Austria
 Switzerland
8
7
7

Various records[edit]

Category World Cup
Season(s) Men Record   Season(s) Women Record
Prize money in CHF
(in a single season)
2000 Austria Hermann Maier 660,000 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 701,797
Overall points 2000 Austria Hermann Maier 2000 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 2414
Margin of victory 2001 Austria Hermann Maier 743 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 1313
Avg. points per race
(only races where participated)
2013 Austria Marcel Hirscher 77 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 69
Avg. points per race
(all races in a season)
2000 Austria Hermann Maier 50 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 69
Red jersey-overall races
(only skier all season lead)
2005 United States Bode Miller 36 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 35
Overall titles 19801996 Luxembourg Marc Girardelli 5 19691980 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 6
Most discipline titles 19751984 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 16 20082013 United States Lindsey Vonn 13
Most discipline titles
(in a single season)
1967
1987
2000
2001
France Jean Claude Killy
Switzerland Pirmin Zurbriggen
Austria Hermann Maier
Austria Hermann Maier
3 2010
2011
2012
2013
United States Lindsey Vonn
United States Lindsey Vonn
United States Lindsey Vonn
Slovenia Tina Maze
3
All titles 19751984 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 19 20082013 United States Lindsey Vonn 17
Wins (in a single season) 1979
2001
Sweden Ingemar Stenmark
Austria Hermann Maier
13 1989 Switzerland Vreni Schneider 14
Most wins at one venue
(single discipline)
20082014 United States Ted Ligety 6 20052013 United States Lindsey Vonn 11
Podiums (in a single season) 2000 Austria Hermann Maier 22 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 24
Top 10s (in a single season) 1999 Norway Kjetil André Aamodt 28 2013 Slovenia Tina Maze 32
All 5 disciplines winners
(in a single season)
1989 Luxembourg Marc Girardelli 9 1991
2006
2013
Austria Petra Kronberger
Croatia Janica Kostelić
Slovenia Tina Maze
8
9
11
All wins 19751989 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 86 19701980 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 62
All podiums 19741989 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 155 19691980 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 113
Top 10 results 19902006 Norway Kjetil André Aamodt 231 19932009 Austria Renate Götschl 198
World Cup starts 19972014 United States Bode Miller 438 19932009 Austria Renate Götschl 408
Youngest race winner 1973 Italy Piero Gros 18.1 1973 Germany Pamela Behr 16.2
Oldest race winner 2012 Switzerland Didier Cuche 37.5 2006 Austria Michaela Dorfmeister 32.9
Consecutive wins
(all disciplines)
19771978 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 10 1989 Switzerland Vreni Schneider 10
Consecutive wins
(single discipline)
19781980 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 15 19891990 Switzerland Vreni Schneider 12
Consecutive podiums
(all disciplines)
19791981 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 41 19791980 Switzerland Marie-Therese Nadig 14
Consecutive podiums
(single discipline)
19771982 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 37 19711974 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 23
Top speed (kph) 2013 France Johan Clarey 161.9 - - -

NOTE: Only crystal globe awarded discipline officially counts as titles. And medal's awarded DH, GS, SL disciplines in seasons 1967-1977 as well. Combined crystal globe was officially awarded only in seasons 2007-2012.

Most successful race winners[edit]

A common measurement on how good individual skiers are is often the total number of World Cup races won during the skiing career. The following skiers have won at least 20 World Cup races:

See also the complete list of Alpine skiing World Cup race winners – Women
Rank Women Career Victories Downhill Super G Giant Slalom Slalom Combined Parallel
1 Austria Annemarie Moser-Pröll 1969–1980 62 36 NA 16 3 7
2 United States Lindsey Vonn 2000–active 59 29 20 3 2 5
3 Switzerland Vreni Schneider 1984–1995 55 20 34 1
4 Austria Renate Götschl 1993–2009 46 24 17 1 4
5 Sweden Anja Pärson 1998–2012 42 6 4 11 18 3
6 Austria Marlies Schild 2001– 2014 37 1 35 1
7 Germany Katja Seizinger 1989–1998 36 16 16 4
8 Liechtenstein Hanni Wenzel 1972–1984 33 2 12 11 8
9 Switzerland Erika Hess 1978–1987 31 6 21 4
10 Croatia Janica Kostelić 1998–2006 30 1 1 2 20 6
11 Germany Maria Höfl-Riesch 2001-2014 27 11 3 9 4
12 Switzerland Michela Figini 1983–1990 26 17 3 2 4
13 Switzerland Maria Walliser 1980–1990 25 14 3 6 2
Austria Michaela Dorfmeister 1991–2006 25 7 10 8
15 Sweden Pernilla Wiberg 1990–2002 24 2 3 2 14 3
Switzerland Marie-Theres Nadig 1971–1981 24 13 NA 6 5
Switzerland Lise-Marie Morerod 1973–1980 24 NA 14 10
18 Slovenia Tina Maze 1999–active 23 3 1 13 3 3
19 France Carole Merle 1981–1994 22 12 10
20 Germany Hilde Gerg 1993–2005 20 7 8 1 3 1
See also the complete list of Alpine skiing World Cup race winners – Men
Rank Men Career Victories Downhill Super G Giant Slalom Slalom Combined Parallel
1 Sweden Ingemar Stenmark 1973–1989 86 46 40
2 Austria Hermann Maier 1996–2009 54 15 24 14 1
3 Italy Alberto Tomba 1986–1998 50 15 35
4 Luxembourg Marc Girardelli 1980–1996 46 3 9 7 16 11
5 Switzerland Pirmin Zurbriggen 1981–1990 40 10 10 7 2 11
6 Austria Benjamin Raich 1996–active 36 1 14 14 7
7 United States Bode Miller 1997–active 33 8 5 9 5 6
8 Austria Stephan Eberharter 1989–2004 29 18 6 5
9 United States Phil Mahre 1975–1984 27 7 9 11
10 Austria Franz Klammer 1972–1985 26 25 1
Croatia Ivica Kostelić 1998–active 26 1 15 9 1
12 Norway Aksel Lund Svindal 2001–active 25 8 12 4 1
13 Switzerland Peter Müller 1977–1992 24 19 2 3
Italy Gustav Thöni 1969–1980 24 NA 11 8 4 1
15 Switzerland Michael von Grünigen 1989–2003 23 23
United States Ted Ligety 2006–active 23 - - 22 - 1 -
Austria Marcel Hirscher 2008–active 23 - - 9 13 - 1
18 Norway Kjetil André Aamodt 1989–2006 21 1 5 6 1 8
Switzerland Didier Cuche 1993–2012 21 12 6 3
  • Note: Only parallel events from (1975, 1997, 2011-2013) which count for overall ranking, included on this list, are considered as official individual World Cup victories.

Top results[edit]

  • NOTE: Only parallel events from (1975, 1997, 2011-2013) which count for overall ranking, included on this list, are considered as official individual World Cup victories.

All-event winners[edit]

Only a few of the most versatile racers have ever managed to win races in all five World Cup alpine skiing disciplines during their career, as listed in the table below. Marc Girardelli (1988–89), Petra Kronberger (1990–91), Janica Kostelić (2005–6) and Tina Maze (2012–13) are the only skiers to have won all five events in a single season. Of these, Tina Maze is the only one to have won five different events in a row within a single season (2012-13, between December 16 and March 2). Bode Miller is the only skier with at least five World Cup victories in all five disciplines. Since the combined was not introduced until the 1974–75 season and the Super G until 1982–83, the following list also includes those racers who won races in all disciplines contested during their World Cup careers (events not contested are marked by NA).

Michèle Jacot, the only female French alpine skiing World Cup overall winner (1970), would be part of this list, if only she had finished her career (1968–1975) one year earlier; from 1969–1971 she achieved 10 victories (1 downhill, 6 giant slaloms, 3 slaloms), but in her last season 1974–75 the combined was introduced, and she could not add a victory in this discipline.

Most race wins in a single season[edit]

The following skiers have won at least 10 World Cup races in a single season (events not available in a given season are marked by NA):

List of World Cup venues[edit]

Men[edit]

No. Venue 67 67
68
68
69
69
70
70
71
71
72
72
73
73
74
74
75
75
76
76
77
77
78
78
79
79
80
80
81
81
82
82
83
83
84
84
85
85
86
86
87
87
88
88
89
89
90
90
91
91
92
92
93
93
94
94
95
95
96
96
97
97
98
98
99
99
00
00
01
01
02
02
03
03
04
04
05
05
06
06
07
07
08
08
09
09
10
10
11
11
12
12
13
13
14
14
15
1 Germany Berchtesgaden + + + + + + +
2 Switzerland Adelboden + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
3 Switzerland Wengen + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
4 Austria Kitzbühel + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
5 France Megève + + + + + + +
6 Italy Madonna di Campiglio + + + + + + + + + +
7 Italy Sestriere + + +
8 United States Franconia, NH +
9 United States Vail, CO +
10 United States Jackson Hole, WY + + +
11 West Germany Hindelang + +
12 France Grenoble +
13 France Chamonix + + +
14 Norway Oslo + +
15 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia/Slovenia Kranjska Gora + + + +
16 France Méribel +
17 United States Aspen, CO + +
18 Canada Rossland, BC +
19 United States Heavenly Valley, CA-NV + + + + + + +
20 France Val d'Isère + + + + + + + + + +
21 Austria St. Anton + + +
22 Sweden Åre + + + +
23 Italy Cortina d'Ampezzo + +
24 Italy Val Gardena + + + + + + + +
25 United States Squaw Valley, CA +
26 Canada Mont St Anne, QC + + + +
27 United States Waterville Valley, NH + +
28 Austria Lienz +
29 Germany Garmisch-Partenkirchen + + + + + + +
30 Canada Vancouver, BC +
31 Norway Voss + + +
32 Switzerland St. Moritz + + + +
33 Switzerland Mürren +
34 United States Sugarloaf, ME +
35 Canada Banff, AB +
36 United States Crystal Mountain, WA +
37 France Pra Loup +
38 Switzerland Grindelwald +
39 United States Anchorage, AK +
40 Japan Naeba + +
41 Austria Saalbach-Hinterglemm +
42 Italy Sterzing + +
43 Austria Zell am See +
44 Austria Schladming + + +
45 France Avoriaz +
46 France Morzine + + + +
47 Poland Zakopane +
48 Czechoslovakia Vysoké Tatry +
49 Austria Fulpmes +
50 Austria Innsbruck + +
51 Canada Garibaldi, BC +
52 United States Sun Valley, ID + +
53 Germany Zwiesel + +
54 United States Copper Mountain, CO +
55 Switzerland Ebnat-Kappel +
56 Switzerland Laax + +
57 Japan Furano + +
58 Spain Sierra Nevada +
59 West Germany Oberstaufen +
60 France Les Houches +
61 United States Stratton Mountain, VT +
62 Switzerland Arosa +
63 France Courchevel +
64 Switzerland Crans Montana +
65 Austria Steinach +
66 Switzerland Villars +
67 Czechoslovakia Jasná +
68 United States Lake Placid, NY +
69 West Germany Lenggries +
70 Bulgaria Borovets +
71 Italy Aprica +
72 West Germany Bad Wiessee +
73 Canada Whistler, BC +
74 Austria Kirchberg in Tirol +
75 Italy San Sicario +
76 Switzerland Pontresina +
77 Italy Courmayeur +
78 Switzerland Parpan +
79 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Sarajevo +
80 France Markstein +
81 West Germany Todtnau +
82 Sweden Tärnaby +
83 Sweden Gällivare +
84 Switzerland Les Diablerets +
85 Norway Oppdal +
86 France Puy St. Vincent +
87 France La Mongie +
88 United States Park City, UT +
89 Argentina Las Leñas +
90 Italy Alta Badia +
91 Norway Hafjell-Lillehammer +
92 Norway Hemsedal +
93 Norway Geilo +
94 Canada Bromont, QC +

Most race wins in consecutive seasons[edit]

Youngest and oldest World Cup winners[edit]

The youngest person ever to win a World Cup race is Christa Zechmeister of West Germany, who won a slalom in Val d'Isere, France, in December 1973 at the age of 16 years, 4 days. Several other women have also won World Cup races at age 16.[5]

The youngest men's World Cup race winner is Piero Gros of Italy, who won a giant slalom in Val d'Isere, France, in December 1972 (one day before Pamela Behr's win) at the age of 18 years, 39 days. Gros would win a slalom race only nine days later, and go on to win 12 World Cup races during his ten-year career. Several other men have also won World Cup races at age 18.[6]

The oldest person ever to win a World Cup race is Didier Cuche of Switzerland, who has won three downhills and a Super-G during the 2011–2012 season, most recently at Crans Montana, Switzerland in February 2012 at the age of 37 years, 192 days. No other men have won a World Cup race beyond the age of 36.[6]

The oldest women's World Cup race winner is Michaela Dorfmeister of Austria, who won a Super G in Hafjell, Norway, in March 2006 at the age of 32 years, 343 days. Two of her Austrian teammates, Alexandra Meissnitzer and Anita Wachter, have also won World Cup races at age 32.[5]

The youngest overall World Cup winner is Annemarie Moser-Pröll of Austria, who won the women's 1971 Alpine Skiing World Cup at the age of 17. She would go on to repeat as overall champion for the next four seasons (1972–1975), along with a 6th overall title in 1979. The youngest men's overall winner is Piero Gros of Italy, who won the men's 1974 Alpine Skiing World Cup at the age of 19 for his only overall title.[7]

The oldest overall World Cup winner is Stephan Eberharter of Austria, who won the men's 2003 Alpine Skiing World Cup at the age of 33, his 2nd consecutive overall title. The oldest women's overall winner is Vreni Schneider of Switzerland, who won the women's 1995 Alpine Skiing World Cup at the age of 30 for her 3rd overall title.[7]

World Cup scoring system[edit]

The World Cup scoring system is based on awarding a number of points for each place in a race, but the procedure for doing so and the often-arcane method used to calculate the annual champions has varied greatly over the years. Originally, points were awarded only to the top 10 finishers in each race, with 25 points for the winner, 20 for second, 15 for third, 11 for fourth, 8 for fifth, 6 for sixth, 4 for seventh, and then decreasing by 1 point for each lower place. To determine the winner for each discipline World Cup, only a racer's best 3 results would count, even though there would typically be 6–8 races in each discipline. For the overall Cup, the best three results in each discipline would be summed. Until 1970, also the results of Winter Olympic Games races and Alpine World Ski Championship races were included in the World Cup valuation (i.e. Grenoble 1968 and Val Gardena 1970); this was abandoned after 1970, mainly due to the limited number of racers per nation who are admitted to take part in these events. For the 1971–72 season, the number of results counted was increased to 5 in each discipline. The formula used to determine the overall winner varied almost every year over the next decade, with some seasons divided into two portions with a fixed number of results in each period counting towards the overall, while in other seasons the best 3 or 4 results in each discipline would count.

Starting with the 1979–80 season, points were awarded to the top 15 finishers in each race. After 1980–81, the formula for the overall title stabilized for several years, counting the best 5 results in the original disciplines (slalom, giant slalom, and downhill) plus the best 3 results in combined. When Super G events were introduced for the 1982–83 season, the results were included with giant slalom for the first three seasons, before a separate discipline Cup was awarded starting in 1985–86 and the top 3 Super G results were counted towards the overall. The formula for the overall was changed yet again the following season, with the top 4 results in each discipline counting, along with all combined results (although the combined was nearly eliminated from the schedule, reduced to only 1 or 2 events per season).

This perennial tweaking of the scoring formula was a source of ongoing uncertainty to the World Cup racers and to fans. The need for a complete overhaul of the scoring system had grown increasingly urgent with each successive year, and in 1987–88 the FIS decided to fully simplify the system: all results would now count in each discipline and in the overall. This new system was an immediate success, and the practice of counting all results has been maintained in every subsequent season. With the ongoing expansion of the number and quality of competitors in World Cup races over the years, a major change to the scoring system was implemented in the 1991–92 season. The top 30 finishers in each race would now earn points, with 100 for the winner, 80 for second, 60 for third, and then decreasing by smaller increments for each lower place. The point values were adjusted slightly the following season (to reduce the points for places 4th through 20th), and the scoring system has not been changed again since that year. The table below compares the point values under all five scoring systems which have been in use:

Place 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
Current System
1993
100 80 60 50 45 40 36 32 29 26 24 22 20 18 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
1992 System
1992
100 80 60 55 51 47 43 40 37 34 31 28 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Top 15 System
19801991
25 20 15 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
1979 System †
1979
25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Original System
19671979
25 20 15 11 8 6 4 3 2 1

† NOTE: The scoring system changed during the 1978–79 season; this special system was used for the last 2 men's downhills and the last 3 races in every other discipline except combined.

Statistical Analysis[edit]

Since the Top 30 scoring system was implemented in 1991–92., the number of completed men's or women's World Cup races each year has ranged from 30 to 44, so the maximum possible point total for an individual racer is about 3000–4400 under the current scoring system. However, very few racers actually ski in all events; for example, Bode Miller was "the only skier to have competed in every World Cup race"[8] during the three seasons from 20032005. The current record for total World Cup points in a season is Tina Maze's 2414 points in 2012–13, with the men's record of 2000 points set by Hermann Maier in 1999–2000. The fewest points for an overall champion under the current system thus far have been 1009 for men by Aksel Lund Svindal in 2008-9 and 1248 for women by Vreni Schneider in 1994–95. The largest margin of victory in the overall has been Maze's 1313 points in 2012-13, more than doubling second place finisher Maria Höfl-Rieschs total, while the largest men's margin was 743 points by Hermann Maier in 2000-1. Note that in the early days of World Cup (when the first place was awarded only 25 points), even larger relative margins of victory were recorded in 1967 by Jean-Claude Killy with 225 points over Heinrich Messner with 114 points and in 1973–74 by Annemarie Moser-Pröll with 268 points over Monika Kaserer with 153 points. The closest finishes since 1992 have been minuscule margins of 6 points in 1994–95 (Vreni Schneider over Katja Seizinger), 3 points in 2004-5 (Anja Pärson over Janica Kostelić) and in 2010–11 (Maria Riesch over Lindsey Vonn), and only 2 points in 2008-9 (Aksel Lund Svindal over Benjamin Raich). The current men's record for total World Cup points in one month of the season is Ivica Kostelić's 999 points from January 2011.

The tables below contain a brief statistical analysis of the overall World Cup standings during the 21 seasons since the Top 30 scoring system was implemented in 1991–92. In general, over 1000 points are needed to contend for the overall title. At least 1 man and 1 woman has scored 1000 points in each of these seasons, but no more than 5 men's or women's racers have crossed that threshold in any single season. Of the 42 men's and women's overall champions in these years, 38 scored over 1200 points, 30 had over 1300 points, 19 reached 1500 points, and only 7 amassed more than 1700 points during their winning seasons. As for the runners-up, 37 of the 42 second-place finishers scored over 1000 points, 18 had over 1300 points, and only 4 reached 1500 points yet failed to win. Most overall titles have been won quite convincingly, by more than 200 points in 23 of 42 cases, while only 11 margins of victory have been tighter than 50 points.

Annual Statistics Calculated for the 19922012 Seasons
Men's Overall World Cup
Races Completed 1st Place Points Margin of Victory 2nd Place Points 3rd Place Points Number of Skiers per Season:
> 1000 Pts > 500 Pts > 200 Pts
Maximum 44 2000 743 1454 1307 5 21 50
Average 35.4 1414 258 1155 1001 2.5 14 41
Minimum 30 1009 2 775 760 1 8 37
Women's Overall World Cup
Races Completed 1st Place Points Margin of Victory 2nd Place Points 3rd Place Points Number of Skiers per Season:
> 1000 Pts > 500 Pts > 200 Pts
Maximum 39 1980 578 1725 1391 5 19 45
Average 33.4 1570 244 1326 1117 3.3 13 37
Minimum 30 1248 3 931 904 1 9 32
Aggregate Statistics Calculated for the 19922012 Seasons
Men's and Women's Overall World Cups: Total Numbers Across 21 Seasons
> 1700 Pts > 1500 Pts > 1300 Pts > 1200 Pts > 1100 Pts > 1000 Pts > 900 Pts > 800 Pts
First Place 7 19 30 38 41 42 42 42
Second Place 1 4 18 24 28 37 40 41
Third Place 4 7 15 27 36 40
> 600 Pts > 500 Pts > 400 Pts > 300 Pts > 200 Pts > 100 Pts >= 50 Pts < 50 Pts
Margin of Victory 2 6 10 19 23 28 31 11

World Cup Finals[edit]

Since 1993 the International Ski Federation (FIS) has hosted a World Cup Final at the end of each season in March. During five days, men's and women's races are held in four disciplines: slalom, giant slalom, Super G, and downhill. Only a limited number of racers are invited to ski at the Finals, including the top 25 in the World Cup standings in each discipline, plus the current junior World Champions in each discipline. Because of the smaller field, World Cup points are only awarded to the top 15 finishers in each race.

Hosts of the World Cup Finals:

The 2004 final was held in all FIS disciplines except Ski Jumping. The Freestyle events were held in neighbouring Sauze d'Oulx and the Snowboard events in Bardonecchia. The 2008 final was held in all FIS disciplines except Ski Jumping. The Freestyle and Snowboard events were held in neighbouring Valmalenco.

Parallel Slalom[edit]

Nations Cup events[edit]

World Cup events[edit]

Note: Only parallel events from (1975, 1997, 2011-2013) count in overall ranking are considered as individual World Cup victories. Other parallel events from (1976-1991, 2009) counted only for Nations Cup or were just show events.

Nations Cup[edit]

The Nations Cup standings are calculated by adding up all points each season for all racers from a given nation.

Year Total Standings   Men's Standings   Women's Standings
First Second Third First Second Third First Second Third
1967  France  Austria  Canada  France  Austria  Switzerland  France  Austria  Canada
1968  France  Austria  Switzerland  Austria  France  Switzerland  France  Austria  United States
1969  Austria  France  United States  Austria  France  Switzerland  France  United States  Austria
1970  France  Austria  United States  France  Austria  Switzerland  France  United States  Austria
1971  France  Austria  Switzerland  France  Switzerland  Austria  France  Austria  United States
1972  France  Austria  Switzerland  Switzerland  France  Italy  France  Austria  United States
1973  Austria  France  Switzerland  Austria  Italy  Switzerland  Austria  France  West Germany
1974  Austria  Italy  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  Austria  West Germany  France
1975  Austria  Italy  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  Austria  Switzerland  West Germany
1976  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  Austria  West Germany  Switzerland
1977  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  France
1978  Austria  Switzerland  United States  Austria  Italy  Sweden  Austria  Switzerland  West Germany
1979  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  West Germany  United States
1980  Austria  Switzerland  Liechtenstein  Austria  Switzerland  Sweden  Austria
 Switzerland
 Liechtenstein
1981  Switzerland  United States  Austria  Austria  Switzerland  United States  Switzerland  United States  West Germany
1982  Switzerland  Austria  United States  Austria  Switzerland  United States  West Germany  Switzerland  United States
1983  Switzerland  Austria  United States  Switzerland  Austria  Sweden  Switzerland  Austria  United States
1984  Switzerland  Austria  United States  Austria  Switzerland  Sweden  Switzerland  United States  Austria
1985  Switzerland  Austria  West Germany  Switzerland  Austria  Italy  Switzerland  West Germany  Austria
1986  Switzerland  Austria  West Germany  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Switzerland  Austria  West Germany
1987  Switzerland  Austria  West Germany  Switzerland  Austria  Italy  Switzerland  Austria  West Germany
1988  Austria  Switzerland  West Germany  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Switzerland  Austria  West Germany
1989  Switzerland  Austria  West Germany  Austria  Switzerland  West Germany  Switzerland  Austria  France
1990  Austria  Switzerland  West Germany  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  West Germany
1991  Austria  Switzerland  Germany  Austria  Switzerland  Norway  Austria  Switzerland  Germany
1992  Austria  Switzerland  Germany  Switzerland  Austria  Italy  Austria  Germany  Switzerland
1993  Austria  Switzerland  Germany  Austria  Switzerland  Norway  Austria  Germany  Switzerland
1994  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Norway  Switzerland  Germany  Austria  Switzerland
1995  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Italy  Norway  Switzerland  Germany  Austria
1996  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Germany  Switzerland
1997  Austria  Italy  Switzerland  Austria  Italy  Norway  Germany  Austria  Italy
1998  Austria  Germany  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  Norway  Germany  Austria  Italy
1999  Austria  Norway  Switzerland  Austria  Norway  Switzerland  Austria  Germany  France
2000  Austria  Italy  Switzerland  Austria  Switzerland  Norway  Austria  France  Italy
2001  Austria  Switzerland  France  Austria  Switzerland  Norway  Austria  France  Switzerland
2002  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  France  Austria  Switzerland  Italy
2003  Austria  Switzerland  United States  Austria  Switzerland  United States  Austria  Italy  Germany
2004  Austria  Italy  United States  Austria  Italy  Switzerland  Austria  Germany  United States
2005  Austria  United States  Italy  Austria  United States  Italy  Austria  United States  Germany
2006  Austria  United States  Italy  Austria  United States  Italy  Austria  Sweden  United States
2007  Austria  Switzerland  United States  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  United States  Sweden
2008  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  United States  Italy
2009  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  Germany
2010  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Germany  Switzerland
2011  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  Germany  United States
2012  Austria  Italy  Switzerland  Austria  Switzerland  Italy  Austria  United States  Italy
2013  Austria  Italy  United States  Austria  Italy  France  Austria  United States  Germany

The early years of the World Cup were largely dominated by the French ski team, as reflected in their Nations Cup wins in 5 of the first 6 years. The Austrian team then took over throughout the rest of the 1970s, followed by Swiss superiority during most of the 1980s. A resurgent Austrian team charged back to the top in 1990, beginning a long streak of consecutive Nations Cup triumphs. Austrian dominance reached its zenith in the late 1990s and 2000s (decade), when their point total regularly doubled that of the second place finisher, and was capped in the 1999–2000 and 2003–4 seasons with totals that tripled those of runner-up Italy. Their 17927 point total in 1999–2000 is a Nations Cup record, as is their 12066 point margin of victory in 2003–4.

As of the end of the 2011–12 season, the Austrian team has won 23 consecutive Nations Cups, while topping the men's standings for 20 straight years and the women's for 14 in a row. Austria is the only nation to have finished in the top 3 of the Nations Cup standings in all 46 years in which World Cup competition has been held, winning in 33 of those years, runner-up in 12 years, and third place in a single year. In the midst of the ongoing Austrian juggernaut, the Swiss or Italian teams have usually held second place. The German team reached the runner-up spot for the first time in 1997–8, as did the Norwegians the next season. The US enjoyed its best placings ever starting in 2004–5, grabbing second in the Nations Cup for two straight years.

Under the current scoring system (since 1992), the winning nation (Austria every year) has averaged over 13000 points, with an average of over 6400 for the runner-up, 5400 for third place, 4200 for fifth, and 1300 for tenth. The all-inclusive scoring system (simply adding together all World Cup points earned) favors national teams with great depth and many racers scoring World Cup points, and even teams with several top racers have no realistic chance of breaking the Austrian grip on the top spot, while a team with only one or two top-ranked racers will struggle to ever break the top five in the standings. There have been numerous calls for a revamped scoring system which would allow other nations to compete more readily for top spots in the Nations Cup, but no changes are likely to be made.[9]

The total number of top-three placings for each nation in the Nations Cup (through the 2011–12 season) are summarized below:

Nation Total Standings   Men's Standings   Women's Standings
First Second Third First Second Third First Second Third
 Austria 33 12 1 35 9 1 27 12 5
 Switzerland 8 21 10 5 25 11 10 8 7
 France 5 2 1 3 3 2 6 3 4
 Italy 6 14 3 5 17 1 6
 United States 3 9 2 3 8 9
 Germany 1 9 1 4 12 12
 Norway 1 2 7
 Canada 1 1
 Liechtenstein 1 1
 Sweden 4 1 1

Note: Results for West Germany and Germany are counted together in this table.

Nations which have won World Cup races[edit]

The table below lists those nations which have won at least one World Cup race (current as of March 16, 2014).[10][11]

Nation Total victories   Victories by discipline
Men Women Team All Downhill   Super G   Giant Slalom   Slalom   Combined   Parallel   Team
 Austria 457 356 3 816 171 112 70 52 89 86 103 84 22 21 2 1 3
 Switzerland 261 285 546 116 84 32 26 71 74 13 76 29 25
 France 119 153 272 29 24 5 23 24 45 57 60 3 1 1
 United States 122 149 271 26 53 9 24 42 20 25 42 20 9 1
 Italy 169 66 1 236 30 15 12 11 49 27 72 12 5 1 1 1
 Germany 39 180 1 220 6 48 6 42 2 46 22 30 2 12 1 2 1
 Sweden 115 79 1 195 8 3 8 53 15 59 41 6 1 1
 Norway 104 8 112 27 25 2 21 4 18 2 13
 Canada 36 38 74 29 15 5 5 2 10 6 2
 Slovenia 23 46 69 2 3 4 1 20 20 16 3
 Liechtenstein 24 39 63 3 2 3 2 4 14 8 13 6 8
 Croatia 26 30 56 1 1 1 2 15 20 9 6 1
 Luxembourg 46 46 3 9 7 16 11
 Finland 14 11 25 4 5 10 6
 Spain 1 11 12 1 7 1 3
 New Zealand 5 5 5
 Russia 5 5 4 1
 Soviet Union 5 5 1 3 1
 Czech Republic 2 1 3 2 1
 Czechoslovakia 3 3 1 1 1
 Australia 2 1 3 1 1 1
 Slovakia 2 2 1 1
 Poland 1 1 2 1 1
 Bulgaria 1 1 1
Total 1565 1470 7 3042 444 371 181 201 372 375 442 422 120 94 6 7 7
  • Note: Only parallel events from (1975, 1997, 2011-2013) which count for overall ranking, included on this list, are considered as official individual World Cup victories. Other parallel events from (1976-1991, 2009) counted only for Nations Cup or were just show events.

Individual race wins are counted in this table, along with the nations team events held at World Cup Finals since 2006 (counts double as both men & women in mixed competition contribute to a win). The "parallel race" is a head-to-head slalom race format used occasionally from the 1970s through 1990s, and again in 2011. Team event wins are doubled (because on one team event race competed both women and men; so it's counted separately each for women and men). Results for West Germany and Germany are counted together in this table. All of Yugoslavia's wins are currently lumped in with Slovenia, since the skiers who won races for former Yugoslavia were all Slovenes from Slovenia (one of six Yugoslav Republics), and thus are listed under Slovenia in online databases. The Soviet Union and Russia are counted separately, as are Czechoslovakia and the Czech Republic.

A total of 24 countries have won World Cup races, with 19 different countries winning men's races and 20 winning women's races. As expected, the top 10 nations in this list are the same as the 10 nations listed in the Nations Cup summary table (with slight changes in order).

Some interesting facts can be found in the data: Marc Girardelli accounted for all of Luxembourg's 46 wins, while Janica Kostelić has 30 of Croatia's 56 and her brother Ivica has the rest. Ingemar Stenmark still has nearly one-half of Sweden's 192 wins more than two decades after his retirement. Some nations specialize in either speed (downhill and Super G) or technical (slalom and GS) disciplines, while others are strong across the board. Among nations with 30+ wins, the Canadian team has won 73% of its races in speed events, while Yugoslavia/Slovenia has won 84% and Sweden 86% of their races in technical events, especially notable in Sweden's case given its large number of wins. Several nations with under 30 wins have 100% of them in technical events, led by Finland and Spain. In contrast Germany and Norway have the most even distribution without disproportionate strength or weakness in any one discipline. Some nations have strong teams in only one gender, as 92% of Norway's wins have come from their men and 83% of Germany's from their women, while the Swiss and Canadian totals are split almost equally.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lang, Serge (1986). 21 Years of World Cup Ski Racing. Johnson Books / James Wotton. ISBN 1-55566-009-6.  Also available under ISBN 0-246-13116-0.
  2. ^ FIS NewsFlash, Edition 72, April 26th, 2006
  3. ^ Lang, Patrick. "World Cup History: The FIS Alpine Skiing World Cup". Retrieved 14 December 2008. 
  4. ^ "FIS: Complete Calendar of Alpine Ski World Cup Races". Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  5. ^ a b "World Cup Women's Age Stats". Ski-db.com. Retrieved 2012-01-28. 
  6. ^ a b "World Cup Men's Age Stats". Ski-db.com. Retrieved 2012-01-28. 
  7. ^ a b "Overall Alpine Ski World Cup Winners". Ski-db.com. Retrieved 2012-01-28. 
  8. ^ Bulman, Erica (2005-10-22). "World Cup Skiing: Miller pushes limits on slopes despite desire". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. 
  9. ^ "Black Diamonds: Nations Cup more than half empty". Ski Racing. Retrieved 2007-02-21. 
  10. ^ "World Cup Men's Races, Team Stats". Ski-db.com. Retrieved 2010-12-14. 
  11. ^ "World Cup Women's Races, Team Stats". Ski-db.com. Retrieved 2011-01-05. 

External links[edit]