Ghost Rider (video game)

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Ghost Rider
Ghost Rider PS2.jpg
Developer(s) Climax Group
Publisher(s) 2K Games
Platform(s) PlayStation 2
PlayStation Portable
Game Boy Advance
Release date(s)
  • NA February 13, 2007
  • AUS February 16, 2007 (PS2, PSP)
  • EU February 23, 2007
Genre(s) Action adventure
Mode(s) Single player
Distribution DVD, UMD, Cartridge

Ghost Rider is a third-person game released for the PSP, PlayStation 2 and Game Boy Advance based on the movie of the same name. The Xbox version of this game was cancelled.

The game's storyline is drawn from the movie, and was penned by Marvel writers Garth Ennis and Jimmy Palmiotti. Players can play as Ghost Rider both on foot, or on the Hellcycle. The villains are both from the movie and the comic, including Scarecrow, Deathwatch, Lilith, Blackout, Vengeance and Blackheart, and for the GBA version, Mephisto.

Plot[edit]

The game serves as a semi-sequel to the movie. One day Mephisto tells Vengeance to bring Ghost Rider to him. Vengeance pursues Johnny on his own hellcycle and captures him, opening a fiery portal in midair which sends Johnny to Hell. In a fit of rage, Johnny becomes the Rider and fights his way through legions of demons. Eventually he reaches the gates of Hell, but Mephisto appears and prevents his escape. The demon lord explains that he is losing his grip on his demon hordes, which are escaping Hell and rampaging on the surface world and if not stopped could trigger the Apocalypse. The angels of Heaven will subsume his kingdom if he cannot bring it back under control, so he attempts to recruit the Rider for the task. Ghost Rider dismisses him, but agrees when Mephisto sends Vengeance to kill Roxanne Simpson, forcing Ghost Rider to kill Vengeance. He travels back to Earth and proceeds to San Venganza and fights Lilith and the demon goddess' sons, along with the Dark Heart monsters and the other demons who had escaped from Hell. Soon, he faces Lilith and kills her on the top of a train. But some of the demon goddess's sons, the Lilin, survive and escape with Blackheart's body. The Caretaker/Phantom Rider arrives, accompanied by the dhampir vampire-hunter Blade to help Ghost Rider and tells the Rider that the vampire Blackout has joined forces with Deathwatch and his demon ninjas to steal military hardware. Ghost Rider goes to fight Blackout and ultimately confronts him. Ghost Rider kills him, while Blade finds Blackheart's body and hides him from his minions. Meanwhile Ghost Rider comes to know that Roxanne was kidnapped. He then fights more evil vampires and finally confronted Scarecrow. Having beaten him, he is directed by Scarecrow to the carnival where his father was killed. He soon confronts Mephisto, who reveals that he was against the Rider all along: in order to summon a portal to Hell and usher in the Apocalypse (but knowing that any efforts using demons would have been thwarted by the angels), Mephisto sent Ghost Rider on his quest so that the hellfire of his cycle would inscribe the massive geoglyph necessarily to summon the portal. Soon, Blackheart appears and grows immensely powerful, but Ghost Rider is able to kill him again. Mephisto then disappears with Blackheart's body and Johnny reunites with Roxanne.

Gameplay[edit]

The game features a system reminiscent to that of God of War and Devil May Cry, even having some of the same controls and style of attacks.[1] Combos are done with bare hands and with the Demonic chain. The overall mood, setting and visual style are very much the same as those in the first installment of Devil May Cry. When on the Hellcycle, Ghost Rider is still capable of performing some of the same chain attacks, and can shoot hellfire.

The Game Boy Advance version has some elements of Road Rash and Castlevania.

Alternate characters[edit]

After beating the game on certain difficulty levels, bonus character skins can be unlocked. They include Classic Ghost Rider, Ghost Rider 2099, Vengeance, and Blade the vampire hunter.

Blade gameplay[edit]

If the player chooses to start the game again as Blade, they get slightly changed gameplay. Blade only has his Daywalker Sword for a weapon, he does not have the shotgun or chain-link attacks of Ghost Rider. Combo attacks are much more limited. He also does not replenish health by absorbing flames from the occasional fire-drums scattered throughout the game levels. Instead, Blade can suck the life force from any wounded foe that is a non-boss (readiness is indicated by a circle above their heads). However, during the motorcycle-racing sections, his vehicle can still shoot firebolts, and he can use his sword for melee combat.

Reception[edit]

Reception
Aggregate scores
Aggregator Score
GameRankings (GBA) 68.75%[2]
(PS2) 56.07%[3]
(PSP) 51.50%[4]
Metacritic (GBA) 68/100[5]
(PS2) 54/100[6]
(PSP) 49/100[7]
Review scores
Publication Score
1UP.com (PS2) C[8]
(PSP) C−[9]
Edge 6/10[10]
Eurogamer 5/10[11]
Game Informer 6.75/10[12]
GamePro 3.25/5[13]
GameSpot (GBA) 7.8/10[14]
(PSP) 4.3/10[15]
(PS2) 4/10[16]
GameSpy (PSP) 3/5 stars[17]
2.5/5 stars[18][19]
GameZone (GBA) 7.5/10[20]
(PS2) 5.4/10[21]
(PSP) 4.5/10[22]
IGN (PSP) 4.5/10[23]
(PS2) 4/10[24]
PlayStation Magazine 6.5/10[25]
Detroit Free Press 1/4 stars[26]

Ghost Rider was met with average to very mixed reception upon release. GameRankings and Metacritic gave it a score of 68.75% and 68 out of 100 for the Game Boy Advance version;[2][5] 56.07% and 54 out of 100 for the PlayStation 2 version;[3][6] and 51.50% and 49 out of 100 for the PSP version.[4][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fahey, Michael (February 15, 2007). "Ghost Rider PS2 Impressions". Kotaku. Archived from the original on February 17, 2007. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "Ghost Rider for Game Boy Advance". GameRankings. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  3. ^ a b "Ghost Rider for PlayStation 2". GameRankings. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b "Ghost Rider for PSP". GameRankings. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  5. ^ a b "Ghost Rider for Game Boy Advance Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  6. ^ a b "Ghost Rider for PlayStation 2 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  7. ^ a b "Ghost Rider for PSP Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  8. ^ Nelson, Mike (February 16, 2007). "Ghost Rider (PS2)". 1UP.com. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  9. ^ Nelson, Mike (March 20, 2007). "Ghost Rider (PSP)". 1UP.com. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  10. ^ Edge staff (March 2007). "Ghost Rider (PS2)". Edge (173): 86. 
  11. ^ Whitehead, Dan (February 24, 2007). "Ghost Rider (PS2)". Eurogamer. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  12. ^ Biessener, Adam (March 2007). "Ghost Rider (PS2)". Game Informer (167). Archived from the original on October 14, 2008. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  13. ^ This Old Man (April 2007). "Review: Ghost Rider (PS2; score mislabeled as "1.5")". GamePro. Archived from the original on February 19, 2007. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  14. ^ Provo, Frank (February 21, 2007). "Ghost Rider Review (GBA)". GameSpot. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  15. ^ Navarro, Alex (February 15, 2007). "Ghost Rider Review (PSP)". GameSpot. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  16. ^ Navarro, Alex (February 15, 2007). "Ghost Rider Review (PS2)". GameSpot. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  17. ^ Leeper, Justin (February 20, 2007). "GameSpy: Ghost Rider (PSP)". GameSpy. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  18. ^ Leeper, Justin (February 20, 2007). "GameSpy: Ghost Rider (PS2)". GameSpy. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  19. ^ Leeper, Justin (March 13, 2007). "GameSpy: Ghost Rider (GBA)". GameSpy. Archived from the original on March 15, 2007. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  20. ^ Bedigian, Louis (April 10, 2007). "Ghost Rider - GBA - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on February 10, 2009. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  21. ^ Lafferty, Michael (February 25, 2007). "Ghost Rider - PS2 - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on April 1, 2009. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  22. ^ Romano, Natalie (February 25, 2007). "Ghost Rider - PSP - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on December 31, 2008. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  23. ^ Haynes, Jeff (February 14, 2007). "Ghost Rider Review (PSP)". IGN. Archived from the original on February 17, 2007. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  24. ^ Haynes, Jeff (February 14, 2007). "Ghost Rider Review (PS2)". IGN. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  25. ^ "Review: Ghost Rider (PS2)". PSM: 86. April 2007. 
  26. ^ Gwinn, Eric (March 3, 2007). "Game Review: 'Ghost Rider' (PSP)". Detroit Free Press (Chicago Tribune). Retrieved April 16, 2015. 

External links[edit]