Goliath (Six Flags Magic Mountain)

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Goliath
Goliath at Six Flags Magic Mountain (first drop).jpg
Goliath's first drop
Six Flags Magic Mountain
Park section Colossus County Fair
Coordinates 34°25′37″N 118°35′49″W / 34.42694°N 118.59694°W / 34.42694; -118.59694Coordinates: 34°25′37″N 118°35′49″W / 34.42694°N 118.59694°W / 34.42694; -118.59694
Status Operating
Opening date February 11, 2000
Cost $30,000,000
General statistics
Type Steel
Manufacturer Giovanola
Designer Werner Stengel
Model Mega Coaster
Track layout Twister
Lift/launch system Chain lift hill
Height 235 ft (72 m)
Drop 255 ft (78 m)
Length 4,500 ft (1,400 m)
Speed 85 mph (137 km/h)
Inversions 0
Duration 3:00
Max vertical angle 61°
Capacity 1600 riders per hour
G-force 4.5
Height restriction 48 in (122 cm)
Trains 3 trains with 5 cars. Riders are arranged 2 across in 3 rows for a total of 30 riders per train.
Flash Pass available
Must transfer from wheelchair
Goliath at RCDB
Pictures of Goliath at RCDB

Goliath is a steel roller coaster made by Giovanola of Switzerland. The hypercoaster is located in the Colossus County Fair area of Six Flags Magic Mountain in Valencia, California and is promoted with a sub-tropical theme that is characterized by ruins of the ancient Mayan civilization. The ride is nearly identical to Titan at Six Flags Over Texas. Its differences from its Six Flags twin is that Goliath lacks the 540-degree upward helix on Titan prior to the mid-course brake run (Goliath simply left banks to the brake run instead) and Goliath is also slightly shorter than Titan.

During a brief period from its opening on February 11 to May 13, 2000, Goliath's 255-foot (78 m) opening drop was recognized as the longest and fastest (85 mph) on a closed-circuit roller coaster in the world. Millennium Force at Cedar Point eclipsed these records when it opened on May 13, 2000 with a drop of 300 feet (91 m) and speeds of 93 mph (150 km/h).

Video of the Ride
A view of the Ride


Ride experience[edit]

Once dispatched from the station, the train makes a nearly 180 degree right turn. The train then ascends the ride's lift hill, reaching a height of 235 ft (72 m). The lift hill slows down at the top, a safety feature that both reduces stress on the chain, and a last-ditch effort in an attempt reduce strong positive g-forces, plus it increases anticipation for the drop. The train begins accelerating down the initial 255 ft (78 m) drop, into the underground tunnel, reaching a speed of 85 MPH. Upon exiting the tunnel, the train heads upwards into a banked right turn that towers above Colossus, Six Flags Magic Mountain's major wooden roller coaster. After completing the turn, the train heads down another drop, flattening out to pass by the onride camera. An airtime hill and banked left turn (rather than a helix on "Titan") into the mid-course brake run follow. The train is decelerated quickly and makes a hard left turn out of the brake section. Another 180 degree banked turn directs the train into a 585 degree, descending helix. Then, the train heads upwards and banks left. Finally, after an ascending right turn, the train reaches the final brake run.

Operation[edit]

  • There is a 120-foot (37 m) long tunnel at the bottom of the first drop.
  • Ride capacity: 1,600 passengers per hour
  • There are three five-car 30-passenger trains, with two abreast seating.
  • A small error was made while the ride's parts were being manufactured by Giovanola. The very last track piece before the final brake run was about 6 inches (150 mm) too short. The mistake was found while the final piece was being bolted to the ride, and a supplementary track piece had to be made to fill the 6-inch (150 mm) gap.
  • This ride was known as The Scream Monster in Judy Moody and the Not Bummer Summer.

Awards[edit]

Golden Ticket Awards: Top steel Roller Coasters
Year 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Ranking 18[1] 14[2] 14[3] 18[4] 18[5] 20[6] 24[7] [8] 30[9] 33[10] 29[11] 40 (tied)[12] 41[13] 41[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Top 25 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. August 2000. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Top 25 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 7B. August 2001. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Top 25 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 7B. September 2002. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 14–15B. September 2003. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 18–19B. September 2004. Archived from the original on April 3, 2007. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 26–27B. September 2005. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 26–27B. September 2006. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 11 (6.2): 36–37. September 2007. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 12 (6.2): 36–37. September 2008. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 13 (6.2): 32–33. September 2009. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 14 (6.2): 34–35. September 2010. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 15 (6.2): 38–39. September 2011. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 16 (6.2): 36–37. September 2012. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  14. ^ "2013 Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 17 (6.2): 34–35. September 2013. Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Fujiyama
World's fastest complete circuit roller coaster
February 2000 – May 2000
Succeeded by
Millennium Force