Flashback (Six Flags Magic Mountain)

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Flashback
Promotional image of the Z Force roller coaster in 1985.jpg
An artist's renderation of Flashback when it was known as Z Force.
Six Flags Magic Mountain
Park section Six Flags Plaza
Coordinates 34°25′29″N 118°35′44″W / 34.424597°N 118.595542°W / 34.424597; -118.595542Coordinates: 34°25′29″N 118°35′44″W / 34.424597°N 118.595542°W / 34.424597; -118.595542
Status Closed
Opening date April 25, 1992
Closing date 2007
Cost $4,000,000[1]
Six Flags Over Georgia
Status Relocated to Six Flags Magic Mountain
Opening date 1988
Closing date 1990
Six Flags Great America
Coordinates 42°21′58″N 87°55′52″W / 42.366099°N 87.931116°W / 42.366099; -87.931116
Status Relocated to Six Flags Over Georgia
Opening date 1985
Closing date 1987
General statistics
Type Steel
Manufacturer Intamin
Designer Werner Stengel
Model Space Diver
Lift/launch system Chain lift hill
Height 86 ft (26 m)
Drop 34 ft (10 m)
Length 1,900 ft (580 m)
Speed 35 mph (56 km/h)
Duration 1:30
Max vertical angle 89°
Capacity 1,100 riders per hour
G-force 5.77
Height restriction 48 in (122 cm)
Flashback at RCDB
Pictures of Flashback at RCDB

Flashback was a steel roller coaster made by Intamin of Switzerland. The coaster was located in the Six Flags Plaza area of Six Flags Magic Mountain in Valencia, California.

History[edit]

Six Flags Great America (1985–1987)[edit]

Flashback first opened in 1985 at Six Flags Great America (at Gurnee, Illinois) as Z-Force and was the only "Space Dive" coaster.[2] In 1987, the ride was closed.[2] The site was later used for a Bolliger & Mabillard stand-up roller coaster named Iron Wolf.

Six Flags Over Georgia (1988–1990)[edit]

Following the ride's closure at Six Flags Great America, it was relocated to Six Flags Over Georgia, west of Atlanta.[3] It opened in 1988 before closing two years later in 1990.[3]

Six Flags Magic Mountain (1992–2007)[edit]

The ride's final relocation was to Six Flags Magic Mountain in California.[4] As part of the relocation, the ride was renamed from Z-Force to Flashback.[4] It opened at the park in 1992.[1]

In 2003, the ride was closed and remained standing but not operating until 2007.[4] On January 23, 2007, the park announced that Flashback would be removed along with Psyclone.[5] Originally, the park stated that Flashback may be re-built within the park for 2008, however it was dismantled and scrapped in December 2007.[4]

Summary[edit]

Ride experience[edit]

Flashback was the world's only hairpin-drop roller coaster, with 6 head-over-heels dives and a 540-degree upward spiral. It was all packed into a relatively small area with 1,900 feet (580 m) of track stacked above each other. The drops were severe, producing a free-fall experience on the plunges; fast steel switchbacks connected the turns just before trains flew into the gravity-defying upward spiral. Trains reached a max of 35 miles per hour (56 km/h), with a 3-g force on the one and a half minute ride.

Trains[edit]

The ride featured three trains, each with five cars. Each car featured riders arranged 4 across for a total of 20 riders per train. The trains were manufactured by Giovanola.[2][3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Magic Mountain Plans to Add $4-Million Ride". Los Angeles Times. 17 December 1991. Retrieved 7 September 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c Marden, Duane. "Z-Force  (Six Flags Great America)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 7 September 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c Marden, Duane. "Z-Force  (Six Flags Over Georgia)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 7 September 2012. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Marden, Duane. "Flashback  (Six Flags Magic Mountain)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 7 September 2012. 
  5. ^ "Six Flags Magic Mountain to dismantle two roller coasters". ThrillNetwork. 23 January 2007. Retrieved 7 September 2012. 

External links[edit]