Graham (mango)

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Mangifera Indica 'Graham'
Mango Graham Asit fs8.jpg
Cultivar 'Graham'
Origin Trinidad from 'Julie' seed.

The 'Graham' mango is a named mango cultivar which originated in Trinidad.

History[edit]

'Graham' was a seedling of the 'Julie' mango planted in Trinidad.[1] In 1932 the variety was introduced to the United States by the USDA through Florida.

'Graham' has become a popular nursery stock tree in Florida for home growing due to its fine flavor and good disease resistance. It was selected as a curator's choice mango for Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden's 2008 mango festival.[2] The fruit is also popular in the Windward Islands.

'Graham' trees are now planted in the USDA's germplasm repository in Miami, Florida.,[3] the University of Florida's Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead, Florida,[4] and the Miami-Dade Fruit and Spice Park,[5] also in Homestead.

Description[edit]

Display of unripe Graham mangoes at the Tropical Agricultural Fiesta in the Fruit and Spice Park in Homestead, Florida.

The fruit is of oval shape, with a rounded apex that sometimes contains a small lateral beak. The skin is yellow at maturity, and is bumpy and undulating. The flesh is orange, fiberless, and has a rich and aromatic flavor with a resinous note.[6] The fruit contains a monoembryonic seed, and typically matures from June to August in Florida.[7]

Unlike its parent 'Julie', 'Graham' is a vigorous grower that reaches over 20 feet in height and forms a round, dense canopy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.virtualherbarium.org/tropicalfruit/mangotrees.html
  2. ^ http://www.fairchildgarden.org/uploads/docs/Mango%2008%20program%20low%20res.pdf
  3. ^ http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/acc/display.pl?1719314 USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program Germplasm Resources Information Network - (GRIN). [Online Database] National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland.
  4. ^ http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/crane/pdfs/TREC-Fruit-Collections.pdf Page 3, #39
  5. ^ http://fruitandspicepark.org/friends/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=43&Itemid=29
  6. ^ Campbell, Richard J. (1992). A Guide to Mangos in Florida. Fairchild Tropical Garden. p. 71. ISBN 0-9632264-0-1. 
  7. ^ http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mg216 Table 1

See also[edit]