Gulu-Nimule Road

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Gulu-Nimule Road is a road in Northern Uganda, connecting the city of Gulu in Gulu District and the town of Nimule in Eastern Equatoria State, in South Sudan, just north of the International border between the two countries. The road, known as Highway A104 in Uganda, continues into Southern Sudan as Highway A43.

Location[edit]

The Gulu-Nimule Road, starts at Gulu, and continues north, through Pabbo, Atiak, Bibia and ends in Nimule, at the border between Uganda and South Sudan, a distance of approximately 120 kilometres (75 mi).[1] The coordinates of the road near Atiak in Amuru District are:03 18 00N, 32 06 36E (Longitude:3.3000; Latitude:32.1110).

Overview[edit]

The Gulu Nimule Road is a gravel-surfaced, two-lane road. It is a major route of transportation between Uganda and South Sudan. During the rainy season, the road becomes impassable, as was the case in 2008 when rains closed it down for a whole week.[2] In March 2009, the World Bank agreed to fund the engineering design of the improved road to an all-weather tarmac surface. Vice Consulting Engineers, a South African firm was awarded the contract to design the road at a cost of US$800,000. The Government of Japan, through the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), and the World Bank will provide the loans to fund the construction, expected to cost US$102 million.[3][4]

Construct timeline[edit]

After several delays, the contract for the Gulu-Atiak section, measuring 70 kilometres (43 mi), was awarded to China Henan International Corporation (CHICO), a Chinese construction Group that has successfully completed civil engineering projects in various African countries, including: Guinea, Liberia, Namibia, Rwanda and Tanzania. The costs for this section of the road will be met by the Government of Uganda and the World Bank. Construction began in May 2012 and is expected to last two years.[5] The remaining section of the road, between Atiak and Nimule, measuring 35 kilometres (22 mi), will be funded by the Government of Japan. That contract was awarded to China Railway Wuju Group Corporation, a division of China Railway Engineering Corporation. Construction of that section was commissioned in August 2013 and is expected to take one year.[6]

Landmarks[edit]

The following landmarks lie close or near the Gulu-Nimule Road:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Map Showing Gulu And Nimule With Distance Marker". Globefeed.com. Retrieved 28 August 2014. 
  2. ^ Ocowun, Chris (3 September 2008). "Gulu-Juba Road Frustrates Traders". New Vision (Kampala). Retrieved 28 August 2014. 
  3. ^ Jeff Lule, and Cecilia Okoth (28 March 2010). "Japan And World Bank Will Finance Upgrade of Gulu-Nimule Road". New Vision (Kampala). Retrieved 28 August 2014. 
  4. ^ News, . (23 August 2013). "Museveni Commissions Tarmacking of Atiak-Nimule Road". Sudan Tribune © 2003-2014 SudanTribune. 
  5. ^ Vision, Reporter (10 May 2012). "Museveni Launches Gulu-Juba Road Works, To Cost USh89 Billion". New Vision (Kampala). Retrieved 28 August 2014. 
  6. ^ Mulondo, Moses (21 August 2013). "Museveni Commissions Atiak-Nimule Road Works". New Vision (Kampala). Retrieved 28 August 2014. 
  7. ^ "Map Showing Gulu And Pabbo With Distance Marker". Globefeed.com. Retrieved 28 August 2014. 
  8. ^ "Distance Between Gulu And Atiak With Map". Globefeed.com. Retrieved 28 August 2014. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 03°18′N 32°07′E / 3.300°N 32.117°E / 3.300; 32.117