HMS Bristol (1910)

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For other ships of the same name, see HMS Bristol.
HMS Bristol (1910).JPG
HMS Bristol
Career Royal Navy Ensign
Class and type: Town-class light cruiser
Name: HMS Bristol
Builder: John Brown & Company, Clydebank
Laid down: 23 March 1909
Launched: 23 February 1910
Commissioned: December 1910
Fate: Sold for scrapping 9 May 1921
General characteristics
Displacement: 4,800 long tons (4,880 t)
Length: 430 ft (131.1 m) p.p.
453 ft (138.1 m) o/a
Beam: 47 ft (14.3 m)
Draught: 15 ft 3 in (4.65 m) (mean); 17 ft 9 in (5.41 m) (maximum)
Installed power: 24,227 shp (18,066 kW) (trials); 22,000 shp (16,410 kW) (service)
Propulsion: 2 × Brown-Curtis steam turbines
12 × Yarrow small-tube boilers
2 × shafts
Speed: 26.84 kn (30.89 mph; 49.71 km/h) (trials); 25 kn (28.8 mph; 46.3 km/h) (service)
Capacity: Coal: 600 short tons (540 t) (1,353 short tons (1,227 t) maximum)
Fuel oil: 260 short tons (240 t)
Complement: 411
Armament: 2 × BL 6 in (152 mm)/50 cal Mk XI guns
10 × BL 4 in (102 mm) Mk VII guns
1 × 3 in (76 mm) Anti-aircraft gun
4 × QF 3-pounder (47 mm (1.9 in)) AA guns
4 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) machine guns
2 × 18 in (457 mm) torpedo tubes
Armour:
  • Deck: 2 in (51 mm), 1.75 in (44 mm), .75 in (19 mm)
  • Conning Tower: 6 in (150 mm)

The fifth HMS Bristol was a Town-class light cruiser of the Royal Navy launched on 23 February 1910 at John Brown & Company's Clydebank shipyard.

On the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, she was in the West Indies and was the first British ship to see action, engaging the German raider Karlsruhe on 6 August. Karlsruhe used her superior speed to escape.

By early December 1914, she formed part of the squadron sent to hunt Admiral Maximilian von Spee and to avenge the defeat at Coronel, and was refueling with coal in the harbour of Stanley on the morning of 8 December. Because of this, she was two hours late in joining the chase which was the Battle of the Falkland Islands and consequently did not engage the main enemy force, attacking two colliers instead.

Bristol was operating in the Mediterranean, and in 1916 she joined the Adriatic Squadron under an Italian admiral and fought in the inconclusive battle of the Otranto Straits against a fleet of Austrian cruisers. She ended the war serving off the coast of South America.

Bristol was sold for scrapping on 9 May 1921 to Ward, of Hayle.

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