Jon Cleary

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Jon Cleary
Born Jon Stephen Cleary
(1917-11-22)22 November 1917
Erskineville, New South Wales, Australia
Died 19 July 2010(2010-07-19) (aged 92)
New South Wales, Australia
Nationality Australian
Occupation Writer

Jon Stephen Cleary (22 November 1917 – 19 July 2010[1][2]) was an Australian writer and novelist. He wrote numerous books, including The Sundowners (1951), a portrait of a rural family in the 1920s as they move from one job to the next, and The High Commissioner (1966), the first of a long series of popular detective fiction works featuring Sydney Police Inspector Scobie Malone. A number of Cleary's works have been the subject of film and television adaptations.

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Cleary was born in Erskineville, Sydney and educated at Marist Brothers College, Randwick. When he was ten his father spent six months in Long Bay Gaol for stealing five pounds. Debt collectors took everything in the Cleary household "except a piano and my mother's double bed," said Cleary. "I remember sitting on the steps with Mum, who was weeping bitterly, and she said, 'Don't ever owe anything to anybody.' That sticks with you, and it's why I gained a justifiable reputation for being tight with money."[3] However he added that "the night after we were repossessed, our friends turned up with chairs, an old table, cakes, sandwiches – they were all battlers but they helped out."[3]

Cleary left school in 1932, aged 14, to help his family financially. He spent the following eight years doing a variety of jobs, notably as a commercial artist for Austral Toon under Eric Porter.[4] He wrote his first story in 1938 at the request of Joe Morley, a journalist friend of Cleary's father. It was a piece about being unemployed which Cleary did not finish because he thought it was self-pitying but he found he did enjoy the process of writing.[5]

War Service[edit]

Cleary enlisted in the Australian army on 27 May 1940 and served in the Middle East before being transferred to the Military History Unit. He served for a time in New Guinea, where his clerk was Lee Robinson, and was discharged on 10 October 1945 with the rank of lieutenant.[6]

Writing career[edit]

Cleary began writing regularly in the army, selling his first story in 1940. The following year he won ₤50 prize writing a story for the Daily Mirror. It was killed by the censor but the newspaper hired Cleary to write a weekly story. He began also to write for The Australian Journal, whose editor sent four of Cleary's short stories to American agent Paul Reynolds, who began selling them to American magazines such as Cosmopolitan and The Saturday Evening Post.[5][7] and in 1945 won equal first prize in a competition for the ABC for his radio play Safe Horizon.[8]

Cleary's first novel was the 1947 work, You Can't See 'Round Corners, which dwelt on the life of an army deserter wanted for the sensational murder of his girlfriend in wartime Sydney. He started writing this in the army and finished it on board a ship en route to London where Cleary had hoped to find work as a screenwriter.[4] Instead he worked as a journalist for the Australia News and Information Bureau from 1948–50, a job he continued in New York from 1950–51.[9] He continued writing short stories and novels.

The success of The Sundowners, which would sell over three million copies, enabled Cleary to write full-time. He lived in Italy for a year then returned home to Australia in 1953 after seven years away.[10] However he continued to live abroad for long stints, notably in Spain and London. His novels became increasingly set in countries other than Australia, with Cleary travelling extensively for the purposes of research.

"I realised at 40 I did not have the intellectual depth to be the writer I would like to be, so I determined to be as good a craftsman as I might be," Cleary said later on.[11]

In the 1970s, Cleary returned to Sydney to live permanently, buying a block of land at Kirribilli opposite the Sydney Opera House, next to businessman Eric McClintock. Cleary built a house on this block and it became his home for the rest of his life.

During the 1970s and 1980s Cleary continued to travel two months of the year to research his novels. After his daughter's death from breast cancer in 1987, and his wife's subsequent ill health he travelled less.[5] Writing the Scobie Malone series of novels enabled him to tell Australian stories which appealed to an international audience, and he remained popular with readers throughout his career. His last novel was published in 2007.

Personal life[edit]

Cleary met his wife Joy on his boat trip to England in 1946 and married her five days after they landed. They had two daughters, one of whom died of breast cancer at age 37, predeceasing both of her parents. Joy Cleary developed Alzheimer's disease and went to live in a nursing home prior to her death in 2003.[12]"I was very, very lucky", said Cleary of his marriage. "We were in love from the day we met to the day we – sorry, I mean she – died."[13]

Cleary was good friends with fellow writers Morris West and Alexander Baron. He was a regular churchgoer, attending Mass every Sunday. For the last three years of his life, he was in ill-health, attended by a full-time carer, and in and out of hospital with heart problems.[3] He died on 19 July 2010, aged 92.

Assessment[edit]

During his lifetime, Cleary was one of the most popular Australian authors of all time. According to Murray Waldren, "his own assessment was that he lacked a poetic eye but had an eye for colour and composition and was strong on narrative and dialogue. And he took pride in the research underpinning his works."[3]

Cleary once stated that the book which had most influenced him was The Power and the Glory by Graham Greene. "He caught perfectly the almost heroism of a man who would have been shocked to hear that he was an hero ... I've always said that Greene could say more in one phrase than most writers in a chapter."[14]

Awards[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

Short stories[edit]

  • The Way Out (1942)[17]
  • Remember? (1943)[18]
  • A Long Time Dying (1943)[19]
  • Clouds in the Sun (1943)[20]
  • Idyll in Havoc (1943)[21]
  • Safe Horizon (1943)[22]
  • Hullo, Joe (1944)[23]
  • I'd Like to Be There at the Finish (1944)[24]
  • Who Pays? (1944)[25]
  • Death Comes Slowly (1944)[26]
  • Title Bout (1945)[27]
  • Brandy Martin and My Old Man (1945)[28]
  • My Heart is Dead and Gone[29]
  • Some Day I May Come Home Again (1945)[30]
  • These Small Glories (1946) – a collection of his short stories
  • Late Date (1946)[31]
  • The Stranger (1946)[32]
  • See You on the Bus (1946)[33]
  • Sundowner on the Skylin (1946)[34]
  • A Time Together[35]
  • Pillar of Salt (1951)[36]
  • The Outsider (1951)[37]
  • No Taste for Trouble (1954)[38]
  • Man from Carolina (1958)
  • Friendly Enemies (1961)[39]
  • Pillar of Salt and other Stories (1963) – collection

Films[edit]

TV[edit]

  • Just Let Me Be (1957) – Cleary did the adaptation of his novel
  • Bus Stop (1961) – two episodes
  • You Can't See 'Round Corners (1967), starring Ken Shorter, John Armstrong, Rowena Wallace and Carmen Duncan – based on his novel only
  • Spearfield's Daughter (1986) (mini series), starring Christopher Plummer, Nancy Marchand, Kim Braden and Steve Railsback – based on his novel

Radio Plays[edit]

  • Debut (1943)
  • Safe Horizon (1944)

Plays[edit]

Unpublished Novels[edit]

  • story of an AIF soldier who goes overseas (1947)[43]
  • the story of a father and son in Sydney 1927–47 with the background of the Sydney Harbour Bridge (circa 1947)[43]
  • The Mayor's Nest (1956) – about Australian politics
  • The Vacant Mine (1979) – uncompleted novel

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Brown, Malcolm (28 July 2010). "Storytelling success made him one of Australia's great writers". Brisbane Times. 
  2. ^ "Vale to Jon Cleary". The Reading Room. 27 July 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c d Waldren, Murray (22 July 2010). "The Australian". 
  4. ^ a b c d "Jon Cleary Interviewed by Stephen Vagg: Oral History". National Film and Sound Archive. 
  5. ^ a b c Susan Geason, "Jon Cleary: A Fortunate Life", The Sydney Morning Herald, 6 December 1992, p. 111
  6. ^ "World War 2 Nominal Roll for Jon Cleary". 
  7. ^ "CLEARY HEARD NEWS IN LONDON.". Sydney Morning Herald (NSW: 1842–1954) (NSW: National Library of Australia). 28 December 1946. p. 7. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  8. ^ "Divided Award In ABC Competition.". The Mercury (Hobart, Tas.: 1860–1954) (Hobart, Tas.: National Library of Australia). 31 January 1945. p. 7. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  9. ^ "A Man in a Queue.". Albany Advertiser (WA: 1897–1950) (W.A.: National Library of Australia). 8 June 1950. p. 2. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  10. ^ "AUSTRALIAN AUTHOR RETURNS HOME.". The West Australian (Perth, WA: 1879–1954) (Perth, WA: National Library of Australia). 21 October 1953. p. 18. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  11. ^ Murray Waldren, 'Jon Cleary: Character Builder' The Weekend Australian 1998
  12. ^ "Jon Cleary", The Book Show – Radio National, 26 February 2006
  13. ^ Cremen, Christine (18 October 2003). "A time for crime and for love". Sydney Morning Herald. 
  14. ^ "Jon Cleary: Interview" by Dianne Dempsey, Sun Herald, 5 October 1997, p. 43
  15. ^ a b "Ned Kelly Awards". Australian Crime Fiction Database. Retrieved 15 September 2007. 
  16. ^ "JOY CLEARY: She's happy to let Jon be the author.". The Australian Women's Weekly (1933–1982) (1933–1982: National Library of Australia). 20 September 1961. p. 9. Retrieved 28 February 2012. 
  17. ^ The Bulletin vol. 63 no. 3268. 30 September 1942 (p. 4)
  18. ^ The Australian Journal vol. 79 no. 933. 1 December 1943 (pp. 681–82)
  19. ^ The Australian Journal vol. 79 no. 930. 1 September 1943 (pp. 499–501)
  20. ^ The Australian Journal vol. 79 no. 928. 1 July 1943 (pp. 384–85)
  21. ^ The Australian Journal vol. 79 no. 927 1 June 1943 (pp. 331–334)
  22. ^ The Australian Journal vol. 79 no. 925. 1 April 1943 (pp. 197–99, 206)
  23. ^ The Australian Journal vol. 79 no. 935. 1 February 1944 (pp. 96, 101–04)
  24. ^ The Australian Journal vol. 79 no. 944. 1 November 1944 (pp. 716–17)
  25. ^ The Australian Journal vol.79 no. 940. 1 July 1944 (pp. 437–41)
  26. ^ Coast to Coast : Australian Stories, 1943 Sydney, New South Wales: Angus and Robertson, 1944 (pp. 32–42)
  27. ^ The Australian Journal vol. 80 no. 949. 1 April 1945 (pp. 249–51, 254–55)
  28. ^ "The Sydney Morning Herald". The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW: 1842–1954) (NSW: National Library of Australia). 18 July 1945. p. 7. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  29. ^ "The Sydney Morning Herald short story". Sydney Morning Herald (NSW: 1842–1954) (NSW: National Library of Australia). 8 August 1945. p. 7. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  30. ^ The Australian Journal vol. 80 no. 946. 1 January 1945 (pp. 17–21)
  31. ^ "Late Date". Sydney Morning Herald (NSW: 1842–1954) (NSW: National Library of Australia). 2 April 1946. p. 4 (Supplement: The Sydney Morning Herald Magazine). Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  32. ^ "The Stranger.". Sydney Morning Herald (NSW: 1842–1954) (NSW: National Library of Australia). 4 June 1946. p. 7 Supplement: The Sydney Morning Herald Magazine. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  33. ^ "See you [?] on the bus.". The Mail (Adelaide, SA: 1912–1954) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 7 September 1946. p. 1 Supplement: Sunday Magazine. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  34. ^ The Australian Journal vol.81 no.961, 1 April 1946 (pp. 268–71, 285–88)
  35. ^ The Australian Journal vol.83 no.986 1 May 1948 (pp. 360–63)
  36. ^ Times Pictorial (1941–1955) [Dublin, Ireland] 3 November 1951, p. 14.
  37. ^ Blue Book Magazine vol.93 no.2 June 1951 (pp.84–89)
  38. ^ This story was serialised in the Sydney Morning Herald in 1954 on 13 Feb, 15 Feb, 16 Feb, 17 Feb, 18 Feb, 19 Feb, 20 Feb Pt 1, 20 Feb Pt 2, 22 Feb, 23 Feb, 25 Feb, 26 Feb
  39. ^ "THE WEEKLY ROUND.". The Australian Women's Weekly (1933–1982) (1933–1982: National Library of Australia). 25 October 1961. p. 2. Retrieved 10 March 2012. 
  40. ^ Jeremy Duns, 'The name's Blaize...' The Sunday Times, 7 March 2010 ST-1
  41. ^ "Stuntman on the Bike Tracks.". The Australian Women's Weekly (1933–1982) (1933–1982: National Library of Australia). 26 June 1974. p. 49. Retrieved 28 February 2012. 
  42. ^ ""I'm disenchanted with Sydney...but it's home".". The Australian Women's Weekly (1933–1982) (1933–1982: National Library of Australia). 30 July 1969. p. 13. Retrieved 28 February 2012. 
  43. ^ a b "Two Books Due From Jon Cleary.". The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA: 1931–1954) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 27 December 1947. p. 9. Retrieved 6 March 2012. 

External links[edit]