Kengtung

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Kengtung
Kyaingtong
Town
The 'Sawbwa Palace, a historic landmark, was destroyed in November 9, 1991 by the Burmese government.
The 'Sawbwa Palace, a historic landmark, was destroyed in November 9, 1991 by the Burmese government.
Kengtung is located in Burma
Kengtung
Kengtung
Location in Burma
Coordinates: 21°17′30″N 99°36′30″E / 21.29167°N 99.60833°E / 21.29167; 99.60833Coordinates: 21°17′30″N 99°36′30″E / 21.29167°N 99.60833°E / 21.29167; 99.60833
Country  Burma
Region Shan State
District Kengtung District
Township Kengtung Township
Time zone MST (UTC+6.30)

Kengtung (Shan: ၵဵင်းတုင်; Burmese: ကျိုင်းတုံမြို့; MLCTS: kyuing: tum mrui., pronounced: [tɕáɪɴtòʊɴ mjo̰]; Thai: เชียงตุง, RTGS: Chiang Tung, pronounced [t͡ɕʰīaŋ tūŋ]; also spelled Kyaingtong, Chiang Tung, Cheingtung, and Kengtong) is a town in Shan State, Burma. It is the principal town of Kengtung Township. Kengtung is located on the National Highway 4 (NH4) and at the AH2 and AH3 of the Asian Highway.

There is an airport in Kengtung.

History[edit]

Kengtung town

Kengtung was founded by the grandson of King Mangrai on the location of an older city of the Lawa people, the original inhabitants of the region.[1] This migration of the Chiangmai dynasty, made in the 13th century with the idea of founding a new kingdom which was called Lanna in Chiang Mai, has resulted in Kengtung having a different type of Tai population from the rest of the Shan State.

Kengtung, like other major towns in the Shan Plateau, was home to a Shan Saopha. Kengtung was the base of the Kengtung Sawbwanate, and had a Sawbwa palace, built by Sao Kawng Kiao Intaleng in 1905.

The city was occupied by the Thai Phayap Army from 1942 until the end of the Second World War.

It is home to the Kyaingtong Degree College.

Geography[edit]

Kengtung contains several lakes. The largest, Naung Tung Lake, lies in the western part of the city, followed by Naung Kham Lake and Naung Yarng Lake to the south of the Kentung Roman Catholic Mission.

Climate[edit]

Taunggyi has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen climate classification Cwa). Temperatures are very warm throughout the year, although the winter months (December-February) are milder and nights can be quite cool. There is a winter dry season (December-April) and a summer wet season (May-November).

Climate data for Kengtung
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 26.7
(80.1)
29.2
(84.6)
32.0
(89.6)
33.0
(91.4)
32.3
(90.1)
30.4
(86.7)
29.6
(85.3)
29.4
(84.9)
29.6
(85.3)
28.7
(83.7)
27.2
(81)
25.7
(78.3)
29.48
(85.08)
Average low °C (°F) 9.6
(49.3)
10.8
(51.4)
14.0
(57.2)
18.2
(64.8)
21.2
(70.2)
22.1
(71.8)
21.7
(71.1)
21.5
(70.7)
20.6
(69.1)
18.6
(65.5)
15.2
(59.4)
11.0
(51.8)
17.04
(62.69)
Precipitation mm (inches) 16.0
(0.63)
8.0
(0.315)
16.0
(0.63)
43.0
(1.693)
160.0
(6.299)
175.0
(6.89)
236.0
(9.291)
243.0
(9.567)
171.0
(6.732)
128.0
(5.039)
79.0
(3.11)
23.0
(0.906)
1,298
(51.102)
Source: HKO (1961-1990)[2]

See also[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Forbes, Andrew ; Henley, David (2011). Traders of the Golden Triangle. Chiang Mai: Cognoscenti Books. ASIN: B006GMID5
  • J. G. Scott, Gazetteer of Upper Burma and the Shan States. 5 vols. Rangoon, 1900-1901.
  • Sao Sāimöng Mangrāi, The Pādaeng Chronicle and the Kengtung State Chronicle Translated. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1981

External links[edit]

References[edit]