Kepler-34

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Kepler-34
Kepler-34b.jpg
An artist's rendering of the Kepler-34 system, showing the binary star being orbited by Kepler-34b.
Characteristics
Spectral type G0V / G0V[1]
Astrometry
Distance 4900 ly
(1499 pc)
Orbit
Primary Kepler-34A
Companion Kepler-34B
Period (P) 27.7958103 (± 0.0000016) d
Semi-major axis (a) 0.22882 (± 0.00019) AU
Eccentricity (e) 0.52087 (± 0.00055)
Inclination (i) 89.8584 (± 0.0080)°
Details
Kepler-34A
Mass 1.0479 (± 0.0033) M
Radius 1.1618 (± 0.0030) R
Temperature 5913 (± 130) K
Metallicity -0.07 (± 0.15)
Kepler-34B
Mass 1.0208 (± 0.0022) M
Radius 1.0927 (± 0.0030) R
Temperature 5867 K
Other designations
KOI-2459, KIC 8572936 2MASS 19454459+4438296[1]

Kepler-34 is an eclipsing binary star system in the constellation of Cygnus. Both stars have roughly the same mass as the Sun, therefore both are spectral class G. They are separated by 0.22 AU, and complete an eccentric orbit around a common center of mass every 27 days. The majority of circumbinary planets were formed much further away from binary stars. They migrated to their current locations. From the physical growh rate of planets and account data on collisions, it is found that Kelper-34b would have grown where we find it now. [2]

Planetary system[edit]

Kepler-34b is a gas giant that orbits the two stars in the Kepler-34 system. The planet is just over a fifth of Jupiter's mass and has a radius of 0.764 Jupiter radii. The planet completes a somewhat eccentric orbit every 288.822 days from a semimajor axis of just over 1 AU, the largest of any transiting planets at the time of its discovery. Such detection was possible as the planet transits both the stars, thus requiring fewer orbits to confirm the planet.

The Kepler-34 planetary system
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b 0.220 MJ 1.0896 288.822 0.182 90.355° 0.764 RJ

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Jean Schneider (2012). "Notes for star Kepler-34(AB)". Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia. Retrieved 7 April 2012. 
  2. ^ "Kepler-34b Helps Explain How Circumbinary Exoplanets Form". sci news. Retrieved 23 October 2014. 

Coordinates: Sky map 19h 45m 44.6s, +44° 38′ 29.6″