Leidyosuchus

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Leidyosuchus
Temporal range: Campanian
Leidyosuchus canadensis, Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada, Late Cretaceous - Royal Ontario Museum - DSC00090.JPG
Leidyosuchus canadensis skull
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Superorder: Crocodylomorpha
Order: Crocodilia
Superfamily: Alligatoroidea
Genus: Leidyosuchus
Lambe, 1907
Species
  • L. canadensis Lambe, 1907 (type)

Leidyosuchus (meaning "Leidy's crocodile") is an extinct genus of alligatoroid from the Late Cretaceous of Alberta. It was named in 1907 by Lawrence Lambe, and the type species is L. canadensis.[1] It is known from a number of specimens from the middle Campanian age Dinosaur Park Formation. It was a medium-sized alligatorid, with a maximum skull length greater than 40 centimeters (16 in).[2]

A number of species had been assigned to this genus over the years, including: L. acutidentatus (Sternberg, 1932), from the Paleocene of Saskatchewan; L. formidabilis (Erickson, 1976), from the Paleocene of North Dakota and Wyoming; L. gilmorei (Mook, 1942), from the Campanian of Alberta; L. multidentatus (Mook, 1930); L. riggsi (Schmidt, 1938); L. sternbergii (Gilmore, 1910), from the Maastrichtian (Late Cretaceous) of Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming; and L. wilsoni (Mook, 1959), from the Eocene of Wyoming.[2] However, in 1997 Chris Brochu reevaluted the genus and reassigned most of the species, transferring L. acutidentatus, L. formidabilis, L. sternbergii, and L. wilsoni to the new genus Borealosuchus, and L. multidentatus to the new genus Listrognathosuchus, proposing L. gilmorei as a synonym of L. canadensis, and finding L. riggsi to be too fragmentary to be determinable.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lambe, Lawrence M. (1907). "On a new crocodilian genus and species from the Judith River Formation of Alberta". Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada, series 3 1 (4): 219–235. 
  2. ^ a b c Wu, Xiao-Chun (2005). "Crocodylians". In Currie, Philip J., and Koppelhus, Eva. Dinosaur Provincial Park: A Spectacular Ancient Ecosystem Revealed. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. pp. 277–291. ISBN 0-253-34595-2. 
  3. ^ Brochu, C.A. (1997). "A review of "Leidyosuchus" (Crocodyliformes, Eusuchia) from the Cretaceous through Eocene of North America". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 17 (4): 679–697. doi:10.1080/02724634.1997.10011017. JSTOR 4523857.