Loyola University New Orleans College of Law

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Loyola University College of Law
Loyola University Seal
Established 1914
Type Private
Dean María Pabón López
Students 850
Location New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Campus Urban
Website http://www.law.loyno.edu

Loyola University New Orleans College of Law is a private law school in New Orleans, Louisiana affiliated with Loyola University New Orleans. Loyola's law school opened in 1914 and is now located on the Broadway Campus of the University in the historic Audubon Park District of the city. The College of Law is one of only fourteen Jesuit law schools in the United States. It is also one of only a few law schools in the nation to offer curricula in both Civil Law and Common Law. The school releases several academic journals, most notable of which is the Loyola Law Review.

History[edit]

Entrance to the Memorial Library on the main campus, which housed the Law Library from 1915-1986

The College of Law was founded as the School of Law as one of the earliest academic departments of Loyola University New Orleans, chartered in 1912. The first session of the School of Law occurred on October 5, 1914; it originally held classes only in the evening and was located downtown at the College of the Immaculate Conception, now known as Jesuit High School. The School of Law was then moved uptown to the St. Charles Avenue campus of Loyola in 1915. In 1925, the law school opened a day division to better serve the needs of its students, as the coursework was expanded to a four-year program.[1] In 1931, the law school became a member of the American Bar Association and became a member of the Association of American Law Schools in 1934. In 1986, the law school moved from the main campus to its current location on the Broadway Campus, only a few blocks away (located on the west side of the Audubon Park).

The School of Law was renamed the College of Law with the passage of the PATHWAYS Plan on May 19, 2006. In 2007, the law school completed a new four-story 16,000-square-foot (1,500 m2) addition to its current building, which increased the number of classrooms, office space and library space.

Ranking[edit]

According to the law professor blog, The Faculty Lounge, based on 2012 ABA data, only 48.6% of graduates obtained full-time, long term, bar admission required positions (i.e., jobs as lawyers), 9 months after graduation, ranking 139th out of 197 law schools.[2]

In 2013, U.S. News & World Report ranked Loyola University New Orleans College of Law 126th in the United States.[3]

Academics[edit]

The school is known for its success in national and international moot court competitions.[4] The College houses the Gillis Long Poverty Law Center, a legal research and education center; William P. Quigley is the current Director.[5]

The school's Sports and Entertainment Law Society provides students interested in legal careers in music, film, and sports with unique opportunities to meet and learn from experts in these respective areas.[6] The school also runs the Stuart H. Smith Law Clinic and Center For Social Justice, where students are admitted to the limited practice of law under a supervising attorney's license for their 3L year. Through the Clinic, students are able to work in a variety of practice areas including criminal defense, prosecution, family law, employment law, immigration, and mediation and arbitration.[7]

Study abroad programs[edit]

Loyola Law has had a long history of contacts with civil law schools in other parts of the world. As a result, Loyola has one of most extensive catalog of study abroad programs in the country.[8][9] These programs draw students from many other law schools in the country. With the school's special focus on the study of international law, over the course of the years, programs have established in the following countries:

  • Budapest, Hungary Flag of Hungary.svg
  • Moscow, Russia Flag of Russia.svg
  • Panama City, Panama Flag of Panama.svg
  • Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Flag of Brazil.svg - inactive until summer 2017
  • Spetses, Greece Flag of Greece.svg
  • Vienna, Austria Flag of Austria.svg

Employment prospects[edit]

The 2013 U.S. News & World Report survey "America's Best Graduate Schools" states that 35.1% of Loyola students were employed at graduation.[10] According to "Official Guide to ABA-Approved Law Schools," 135 out of 278 or 48.6% of Loyola 2012 graduates were employed 9 months after graduation in a full-time position requiring bar passage.[11]

Notable alumni[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whelan, S.J., James F. (November 1946). "Loyola University, New Orleans". The Southern Association Quarterly (Duke University Press) 10 (4): 540. ISSN 0890-7145. 
  2. ^ Rosin, Gary. "Full Rankings: Bar Admission Required, Full-Time, Long Term", The Faculty Lounge, March 30, 2013. Retrieved on February 24, 2014, http://www.thefacultylounge.org/2013/03/-full-rankings-bar-admission-required-full-time-long-term.html. -- For the latest Employment Summary Reports from the American Bar Association, Section of Legal Education, see http://employmentsummary.abaquestionnaire.org/
  3. ^ Loyola University New Orleans College of Law &#126, U.S. News & World Report, 3/11/2013
  4. ^ Loyola University New Orleans College of Law, October 2010, top-law-schools.com
  5. ^ Quigley
  6. ^ http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Sports-and-Entertainment-Law-Society-Loyola-University-New-Orleans/61730626335?v=info
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ http://law.loyno.edu/fsp/
  9. ^ http://law.loyno.edu/fsp/foreign_summer_progs.html
  10. ^ Loyola University New Orleans - Law - Best Graduate Schools, US News and World Report, 3/11/2013
  11. ^ INDIVIDUAL SCHOOL SUMMARY REPORTS, American Bar Association
  12. ^ "Theodore M. Haik, Jr.". hmg-law.com. Retrieved July 16, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Justice Jeannett Theriot Knoll". October 18, 2013. 
  14. ^ http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/afro_am/African_American_Presence/1990.html

External links[edit]