M-54 (Michigan highway)

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M-54 marker

M-54
M-54 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by MDOT
Length: 30.276 mi[3] (48.724 km)
Existed: 1962[1][2] – present
Major junctions
South end: I‑75 near Grand Blanc
 

I‑69 at Flint
I‑475 in Flint
M‑57 near Clio

M‑83 near Birch Run
North end: I‑75 / US 23 in Birch Run
Location
Counties: Genessee, Saginaw
Highway system
M‑53 M‑55

M-54 is a state trunkline highway in the US state of Michigan that bypasses the city of Flint. It is named Dort Highway in much of its length, in honor of Flint carriage and automobile pioneer Josiah Dallas Dort. The portion from the north end of Dort Highway to Clio Road is part of the historic Saginaw Trail, and was also part of the old Dixie Highway. The modern highway runs for 30.276 miles (48.724 km) through Genesee and Saginaw counties from a connection with Interstate 75 (I-75) near Grand Blanc on the south to Birch Run on the north. The highway serves mostly suburban and urban sections of the Flint area. Outside of the city, it also passes through agricultural areas in northern Genesee County and southeastern Saginaw County.

The first state highway along the general route of M-54 was M-10, one of the original state trunklines signed in 1919. Later, it was redesignated as part of US Highway 10 (US 10) in the 1920s. After a series of realignments in the 1940s and 1960s, the roadway was given the M-54 designation in 1962. A segment of Saginaw Road through Flint was redesignated a business route in the 1940s that became Business M-54 (BUS M-54) as well in 1962. That business loop was decommissioned in 1974. Previously, two other highways in Michigan bore the M-54 designation: a roadway that is now part of M-37 and one that is BUS US 2 in Ironwood.

Route description[edit]

M-54 starts at exit 109 along I-75 and follows Dort Highway northward through suburban Grand Blanc Township. The area near the southern end is mostly residential, but north of Reid Road, there is the Grand Blanc Metal Center plant for GM to the east of the highway. M-54 intersects Hill and Saginaw roads in the unincorporated community of Whigville as the trunkline passes out of the industrial area surrounding the plant. North of the Maple Road intersection, Dort Highway crosses into Burton, and the suburban residential neighborhoods give way to commercial properties along the roadway.[4][5] There is a rail line owned by CSX Transportation that runs parallel to the highway about a half mile (0.8 km) to the east.[6] North of Atherton Road, M-54 crosses into Flint and runs through the city's east side. The trunkline intersects I-69 near the Amtrak station in the city,[4][5] and a crossing with a line of the Canadian National Railway.[6] Between Robert T. Longway Boulevard and Davison Road, Dort Highway passes another industrial area. North of Leith Street, the highway turns to the northwest,[4][5] and the parallel railroad, still part of the CSX line, follows suit.[6]

Dort Highway crosses the Flint River on the northeast side of the city near the interchange that connects the highway to I-475. This interchange uses the connection with Stewart Avenue on the western side of the river to provide all of the possible traffic movements between the freeway and the highway. M-54 turns due northerly past the interchange and crosses under the rail line as it heads out of Flint. The area north of the city line on Carpenter Avenue is dominated by industrial properties as far north as Coldwater Road.[4][5] Running northward through a more rural area, M-54 passes to the east of Mount Morris. Turning northwesterly, the trunkline is dotted with commercial businesses as it continues to the Clio area.[4][7] The highway runs parallel to east of the railroad, now part of the Saginaw Bay Southern Railway.[6] It passes the Flint Memorial Park cemetery and the Auto City Speedway, a motorsports race track in an area that is otherwise agricultural in nature away from the main highway. The Dort Highway name ends at the intersection with Saginaw Road, and the highway takes on the latter name. East of Clio, M-54 intersects M-57 in the unincorporated community of Pine Run.[4][7]

Wrong-way concurrency looking eastward along Birch Run Road

Past the town, M-54 turns due north on Clio Road before crossing into southern Saginaw County. Over the county line, the name changes to Gera Road, and the trunkline runs through farm fields to an intersection with Birch Run Road. At that intersection, M-54 northbound turns westward and joins M-83 to run concurrently to Birch Run while M-83 continues north to Frankenmuth on Gera Road. Birch Run Road carries opposing directions of the two highways, a phenomenon called a wrong-way concurrency. Running westward, the road is signed as both M-54 northbound or M-83 southbound. About two miles (3.2 km) west of the intersection between Gera and Birch Run roads, the two highways meet a common terminus at exit 136 on I-75/US 23 in a commercial district that includes a large outlet mall bordering that freeway.[4][7]

M-54 is maintained by MDOT like other state highways in Michigan. As a part of these maintenance responsibilities, the department tracks the volume of traffic that uses the roadways under its jurisdiction. These volumes are expressed using a metric called annual average daily traffic, which is a statistical calculation of the average daily number of vehicles on a segment of roadway. MDOT's surveys in 2010 showed that the highest traffic levels along M-54 were the 30,145 vehicles daily north of the I-69 interchange in Flint; the lowest counts were the 2,880 vehicles per day along the M-83 concurrency.[8] M-54 between I-75 in Grand Blanc Township and M-57 near Clio has been listed on the National Highway System,[9] a network of roads important to the country's economy, defense, and mobility.[10]

History[edit]

Previous designations[edit]

The first version of M-54 began at M-16 (later US 16) near Grand Rapids and ran northerly along the current M-37 corridor to M-20 (later US 10).[11] This version of M-54 was replaced by an extension of M-37 by 1927.[12] The second incarnation of M-54 was designated in Ironwood along the former US 2 routing through downtown in 1934.[13][14] This was replaced by the current BUS US 2 around 1945.[15]

Current designation[edit]

Originally, Saginaw Road in the Flint area was a part of the Saginaw Trail, a Native American foot path in the area.[16] In the early 20th century, the highway was a part of the Dixie Highway through the area.[17] When the state signed its highway system in 1919,[18] Saginaw Road was part of M-10;[11] later it was used as a section of US 10 in 1926.[19] In August 1926, the Flint City Council renamed the former Western Road after Joasiah Dallas Dort, a partner in GM.[20] By 1942, the highway was moved eastward to follow Dort Highway, and the route through the city was designated BUS US 10.[21]

The current M-54 was designated in 1962 for a former routing of US 10 through the Flint area; US 10 was moved after the completion of the I-75 freeway, and the M-54 designation was applied to the Saginaw Road-Dort Highway routing of US 10 from I-75 in Grand Blanc to M-83 in Birch Run. At the same time, BUS US 10 became BUS M-54 through Flint.[1][2] An extension of Dort Highway in 1987 relocated the southern end of M-54 in Grand Blanc to end at exit 109 on I-75.[22][23]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location Mile[3] km Destinations Notes
Genesee Grand Blanc Township 0.000–
0.192
0.000–
0.309
I‑75 – Detroit, Flint Exit 109 on I-75
Flint 7.492–
7.505
12.057–
12.078
I‑69 – Lansing, Port Huron Exit 138 on I-69
10.760–
11.159
17.317–
17.959
I‑475 – Flint Exit 9 on I-475
Vienna Township 22.930 36.902 M‑57 (Vienna Road) – Clio, Otisville
Saginaw Birch Run Township 28.182 45.355 M‑83 north (Birch Run Road) – Frankenmuth Eastern end of M-83 wrong-way concurrency
Birch Run 30.179–
30.276
48.568–
48.724
I‑75 / US 23 – Flint, Saginaw Western end of M-83 concurrency; both end together at exit 136 on I-75/US 23
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Business route[edit]


BUS M-54
Location: Grand BlancMount Morris
Length: 14.767 mi[3] (23.765 km)
Existed: 1962[1][2]–1974[24][25]

Business M-54 (BUS M-54) was a business loop in the Flint area. It ran for about 14.8 miles (23.8 km) along Saginaw Road, which was also called Saginaw Street in the city of Flint. The highway connected to its parent, M-54, in Grand Blanc Township on the south end and ran through suburban Burton northwesterly into Flint. There it ran through downtown, passing under I-475 without an interchange. BUS M-54 ran parallel to that freeway and met I-69 at an interchange near downtown. There were intersections with both directions of M-21; eastbound M-21 was routed on 5th Street while westbound traffic followed Court Street one block north. The highway crossed the Flint River and turned northward. Saginaw Street continued parallel to what is now I-475 before passing out of town. In Mount Morris Township north of Flint, the business loop terminated at the intersection with M-54 (Dort Highway).[24][26]

Originally, Saginaw Road in the Flint area was a part of the Saginaw Trail, a Native American foot path in the area.[16] When the state signed its highway system in 1919,[18] Saginaw Road was part of M-10.[11] Later it was used as a section of US 10 in 1926.[19] By 1942, the highway was moved eastward to follow Dort Highway, and the route through the city was designated BUS US 10.[21] Later, in 1962, US 10 was moved again to follow the recently completed I-75 freeway; the former route of US 10 was redesignated M-54 and its business loop was renumbered to match.[1][2] This business route lasted until 1974; at the same time that I-475 was completed, BUS M-54 was decommissioned and turned over to local control.[24][25]

Major intersections

The entire highway was in Genesee County.

Location Mile[3] km Destinations Notes
Grand Blanc Township 0.00 0.00 M‑54 (Dort Highway)
Flint 4.767–
4.756
7.672–
7.654
I‑69 – Lansing, Port Huron Exit 136 on I-69
5.011 8.064 M‑21 east (5th Street) Southern part of a one-way pairing
5.092 8.195 M‑21 west (Court Street) Northern part of a one-way pairing
Mount Morris Township 14.767 23.765 M‑54 (Dort Highway)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Michigan State Highway Department (1962). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by MSHD. Section K12–L12.
  2. ^ a b c d Michigan State Highway Department (1963). Official Highway Map (Map). Cartography by MSHD. Section K12–L12.
  3. ^ a b c d Michigan Department of Transportation (2009). MDOT Physical Reference Finder Application (Map). Cartography by Michigan Center for Geographic Information. http://www.mcgi.state.mi.us/prfinder/. Retrieved May 1, 2012.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Google Inc. "Overview Map of M-54". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=M-54+N&daddr=42.95512,-83.65323+to:43.08404,-83.67437+to:43.227179,-83.7351732+to:Main+St&hl=en&sll=43.041293,-83.687153&sspn=0.120944,0.116558&geocode=Fd-sjgIdtJED-w%3BFXBxjwIdko0D-ymXLXT75n4jiDEv2Iq8gpq6lg%3BFQhpkQId_joD-ynztGUHq4YjiDG15xMWndkK1Q%3BFSuYkwIde00C-ylhG6nicY4jiDFG4JKCfeChTA%3BFQTykwIdQKoB-w&oq=Birch+Run&mra=ls&via=1,2,3&t=h&z=11. Retrieved May 1, 2012.
  5. ^ a b c d Michigan Department of Transportation (2011). State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:3.5 mi / 1 cm:2 km. Flint inset.
  6. ^ a b c d Michigan Department of Transportation (January 2011) (PDF). Michigan's Railroad System (Map). http://www.michigan.gov/documents/MDOT_Official_Rail_130897_7.pdf. Retrieved February 1, 2011.
  7. ^ a b c Michigan Department of Transportation (2011). State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:15 mi / 1 cm:9 km. Section K12–L12.
  8. ^ Bureau of Transportation Planning (2008). "Traffic Monitoring Information System". Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 26, 2012. 
  9. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (April 23, 2006) (PDF). National Highway System, Michigan (Map). http://www.michigan.gov/documents/MDOT_NHS_Statewide_150626_7.pdf. Retrieved October 7, 2008.
  10. ^ Adderly, Kevin (August 26, 2010). "The National Highway System". Planning, Environment & Realty. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved January 1, 2011. 
  11. ^ a b c Michigan State Highway Department (July 1, 1919). State of Michigan: Lower Peninsula (Map). Cartography by MSHD.
  12. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (December 1, 1927). Official Highway Service Map (Map). Cartography by MSHD.
  13. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (September 1, 1933). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally.
  14. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (September 1, 1934). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally.
  15. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (October 1, 1945). Official Highway Map of Michigan (Map). Cartography by MSHD. Section C1.
  16. ^ a b Barnett, LeRoy (2004). A Drive Down Memory Lane: The Named State and Federal Highways of Michigan. Allegan Forest, MI: Priscilla Press. pp. 192–3. ISBN 1-886167-24-9. 
  17. ^ Rand McNally (1921). Official Auto Trails Map (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally. District 3: Southern Peninsula of Michigan, Northern Indiana, Northwestern Ohio inset.
  18. ^ a b "Michigan May Do Well Following Wisconsin's Road Marking System". The Grand Rapids Press. September 20, 1919. p. 10. 
  19. ^ a b Bureau of Public Roads (November 11, 1926). United States System of Highways Adopted for Uniform Marking by the American Association of State Highway Officials (Map). 1:7,000,000. Cartography by U.S. Geological Survey. OCLC 32889555. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth298433/m1/1/zoom/. Retrieved November 7, 2013.
  20. ^ Barnett, LeRoy (2004). A Drive Down Memory Lane: The Named State and Federal Highways of Michigan. Allegan Forest, MI: Priscilla Press. pp. 75–6. ISBN 1-886167-24-9. 
  21. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (June 1, 1942). 1942 Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally (Summer ed.). Section K12.
  22. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1987). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi / 1 in:23 km. Cartography by MDOT. Section L12.
  23. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1988). Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi / 1 in:23 km. Cartography by MDOT. Section K12.
  24. ^ a b c Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation (1974). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi. Section K12.
  25. ^ a b Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation (1975). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi / 1 in:23 km. Section K12.
  26. ^ Google Inc. "Overview Map of Former BUS M-54". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=M-54+S%2FS+Dort+Hwy&daddr=42.96647,-83.67177+to:43.00266,-83.67746+to:43.01823,-83.69269+to:43.04062,-83.6939+to:Saginaw+Rd&hl=en&sll=43.122913,-83.700628&sspn=0.060392,0.058279&geocode=FcxOjwIdX48D-w%3BFcadjwIdJkUD-ykpQKusLn8jiDHGClUNMrE6JQ%3BFSQrkAId7C4D-ylp-sUpAIIjiDFZNDe2gRmIGw%3BFfZnkAIdbvMC-ynrGS-IFoIjiDHHKCg3wHg-Mw%3BFWy_kAIdtO4C-yl_AjxSy4MjiDFtFE4DlmsCWw%3BFXhvkgIdPOsC-w&oq=Mount+M&mra=ls&via=1,2,3,4&t=h&z=12. Retrieved May 1, 2012.

External links[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing

  • M-54 at Michigan Highways
  • M-54 at Michigan Highway Ends