Mason Reese

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Mason Reese
6.8.08MasonReeseByLuigiNovi.jpg
Reese at the Big Apple Convention, June 8, 2008.
Born (1965-04-11) April 11, 1965 (age 49)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.

Mason Reese is a former child actor who appeared in numerous television commercials in the 1970s, particularly for Underwood Deviled Ham, Post Raisin Bran, and Dunkin' Donuts' Dunkin' Munchkins-brand "donut holes". He was also a frequent guest on The Mike Douglas Show.

Early life and acting career[edit]

Reese, the youngest son of William Reese and former actress Sonia Darrin, had a verbal precocity, red hair and slight lisp, all of which made him a recognizable figure. He was a frequent guest on the Mike Douglas Show.[1] He appeared in numerous television commercials in the 1970s, particularly for Underwood Deviled Ham, Post Raisin Bran, and Dunkin' Donuts' Dunkin' Munchkins-brand "donut holes".

Reese was the subject of the song "Mason Reese" by Alice Donut on their 1988 debut album, Donut Comes Alive. The song is a reflection on the destinies of former child stars. He appeared as himself in a 1990 short film directed by Brett Ratner called Whatever Happened to Mason Reese?, which can be seen on the DVD of the feature film Rush Hour.

Post-acting career[edit]

Since retiring from acting Reese has become a restaurant entrepreneur with multiple businesses in the New York City area. He owns Paladar, a Pan-Latino restaurant located in Manhattan's Lower East Side.[2] He opened an establishment named "Destination Bar and Grille" located on Avenue A in the East Village.[3] His most recent venture is "The Luxury Box", an upscale sports bar.[4]

Personal life[edit]

Reese has three siblings.[citation needed] He attended Saint Michael's Montessori School, a non-denominational elementary school that was housed in St. Michael's Church on W. 99th Street in Manhattan, through fourth grade. In late 1975 he transferred to Professional Children's School, on West 60th Street in Manhattan.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas, Mike. Mike Douglas, My Story. New York: Putnam, 1978. ISBN 978-0-399-11963-7
  2. ^ Lewis, Steve (June 19, 2008). "More Than 15 Minutes With Mason Reese (Part Two)". goodnightmrlewis.com.[dead link]
  3. ^ Venezia, Todd (May 18, 2009). "TV Kid a Club King: Mason Reese in Comeback". New York Post.
  4. ^ Ask American Profile. Published in American Profile magazine. January 29, 2012 edition.
  5. ^ Reese, Mason. The Memoirs of Mason Reese. Dodd, Mead (1974).

External links[edit]