Mexican Federal Highway 2

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Federal Highway 2 shield

Federal Highway 2
Carretera Federal 2
Route information
Maintained by Secretariat of Communications and Transportation
Length: 1,987.34 km[1][2][3][4][5][6] (1,234.88 mi)
Western segment
Length: 1,343.14 km[1][2][3] (834.59 mi)
West end: Fed. 1 in Tijuana, B.C.
Major
junctions:

Fed. 15 in Santa Ana, Son.
Fed. 15 in Imuris

Fed. 45 in Cd. Juárez, Chih.
East end: El Porvenir
Eastern segment
Length: 644.20 km[4][5][6] (400.29 mi)
West end: Cd. Acuña, Coahuila
Major
junctions:

Fed. 57 in Piedras Negras
Fed. 85 in Nvo. Laredo, Tamps.
Fed. 30 in Nva. Cd. Guerrero
Fed. 54 in Cd. Mier
Fed. 40 in Reynosa

Fed. 101 / Fed. 180 in Matamoros
East end: Playa Lauro Villar at the Gulf of Mexico
Location
States: Baja California, Sonora, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, Tamaulipas
Highway system

Mexican Federal Highways
List • Autopistas

Fed. 1D Fed. 3

Federal Highway 2 (Carretera Federal 2) runs along the Mexico–United States border.

Route description[edit]

Lengths
  km mi
Western segment
B.C. 244.03[1] 151.63
Son. 745.79[2] 463.41
Chih. 353.32[3] 219.54
Segment
total
1343.14 834.59
Eastern segment
Coah. 204.02[4] 126.77
N.L. 24.00[5] 14.91
Tamps. 416.18[6] 248.60
Segment
total
644.20 400.29
Total 1987.34 1234.88

The highway is divided into two discontinuous segments. The western segment begins in Tijuana, Baja California, and terminates at El Porvenir, Chihuahua, near Ciudad Juárez. The eastern segment begins at Ciudad Acuña, Coahuila, and continues to the Gulf of Mexico at Playa Lauro Villar, Tamaulipas, near Matamoros.

Between Tijuana and Mexicali in Baja California, and again between Reynosa and Matamoros in Tamaulipas, the route is bypassed by Mexican Federal Highway 2D, a four lane controlled access toll road referred to in Mexico as an autopista. It is advised that drivers use pesos when paying tolls as US dollars may be accepted at a rate disadvantageous to the driver. Highway 2 is considered to be part of Pacific Coastal Highway from Tijuana to Highway 15 in the State of Sonora.

The highway passes through the border states of Baja California, Sonora, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas. The highway also has connecting access to every official port of entry into the United States with the exception of the international bridge between Ojinaga, Chihuahua, and Presidio, Texas, which is within the gap between the two highway segments. These ports of entry allow access from the highway to all four United States border states: California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. As a result, customs inspection stations are common along some sections of the highway.

Even if the highway were to be extended to join the two segments, the gap between the two is more directly crossed by traveling along Interstate 10 and U.S. Highway 90 in the United States because of the course of the Rio Grande (Río Bravo del Norte) around the Big Bend region of Texas.

Federal highways in Mexico are generally designated with even numbers for east-west routes and odd numbers for north-south routes. Numerical designations usually ascend southward away from the U.S. border for east-west routes, and usually ascend eastward away from the Pacific Ocean for north-south routes. Therefore, Federal Highway 2, due to its proximity to the border, has the lowest possible even number designation, and intersecting north-south federal routes conform to this pattern.

Major intersections[edit]

Colorado Bridge, a toll bridge over the Colorado River connecting the states of Baja California and Sonora

Western segment[edit]

The eastern terminus of this segment is in El Porvenir, Chihuahua.

Eastern segment[edit]

The western terminus of this segment is in Ciudad Acuña, Coahuila

The eastern terminus of this segment is at Playa Lauro Villar on the Gulf of Mexico.


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Datos Viales de Baja California" (PDF) (in Spanish). Dirección General de Servicios Técnicos, Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes. 2011. pp. 5–7. Retrieved 2011-10-17. 
  2. ^ a b c "Datos Viales de Sonora" (PDF) (in Spanish). Dirección General de Servicios Técnicos, Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes. 2011. pp. 4–6, 13. Retrieved 2011-10-17. 
  3. ^ a b c "Datos Viales de Chihuahua" (PDF) (in Spanish). Dirección General de Servicios Técnicos, Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes. 2011. pp. 4, 7–8. Retrieved 2011-10-17. 
  4. ^ a b c "Datos Viales de Coahuila" (PDF) (in Spanish). Dirección General de Servicios Técnicos, Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes. 2011. pp. 8, 10. Retrieved 2011-10-17. 
  5. ^ a b c "Datos Viales de Nuevo León" (PDF) (in Spanish). Dirección General de Servicios Técnicos, Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes. 2011. p. 8. Retrieved 2011-10-17. 
  6. ^ a b c "Datos Viales de Tamaulipas" (PDF) (in Spanish). Dirección General de Servicios Técnicos, Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes. 2011. pp. 8–11. Retrieved 2011-10-17.