Mikura-class escort ship

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Nomi 1944
Class overview
Operators:  Imperial Japanese Navy
Preceded by: Etorofu-class
Succeeded by: Ukuru-class
Built: 1942–1944
In commission: 1943–1948
Completed: 8
Lost: 5
General characteristics
Type: Escort vessel
Displacement: 940 long tons (955 t) standard
Length: 77.7 m (255 ft) 258.4
Beam: 9.1 m (29 ft 10 in) 29.10
Draught: 3.05 m (10 ft) 10
Propulsion: 2 shaft, geared diesel engines, 4,400 hp (3,281 kW)
Speed: 19.5 knots (22.4 mph; 36.1 km/h)
Range: 5,000 nmi (9,300 km) at 16 kn (18 mph; 30 km/h)
Complement: 150
Armament: As built :
• 3 × 120 mm (4.7 in)/45 cal DP guns
• 4 × 25 mm (0.98 in) AA machine guns (2×2)
• 6 × depth charge throwers
• 120 × depth charges
From 1944 :
• 3 × 120 mm (4.7 in)/45 cal DP guns
• 14-18 × 25 mm (0.98 in) AA machine guns
• 6 × depth charge throwers
• 120 × depth charges
• 1 × 80 mm (3.1 in) mortar

The Mikura-class escort ships (御蔵型海防艦 Mikura-gata kaibōkan?) were a class of ships in the service of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II.

The Japanese called these ships Kaibōkan, "ocean defence ships" (Kai = sea, ocean, = defense, Kan = ship), a name used to denote a multi-purpose vessel.[1] The eight ships of the Mikura class served as convoy escorts during World War II. They were denoted "Type B" and were the third class of Kaibokan. The Mikuras, unlike the two preceding Etorofu-class and Shimushu-class, were dedicated to the anti-aircraft and anti-submarine role.

The Mikura class was initially armed with 120 depth charges with six depth charge throwers and would later receive an 8 cm trench mortar. The number of AA machine guns was increased to up to eighteen. They received Type 22 and Type 13 radars, and Type 93 or Type 3 sonar in 1943-1944.

Two ships of the class probably had success against US submarines, with Mikura helping to sink USS Trigger with kaibokans CD-33 and CD-59 on March 28, 1945. Chiburi also helped sink USS Growler with destroyer Shigure and kaibokan CD-19 on 8 November 1944.

Ships[edit]

  • Mikura (御蔵), constructed at Nihon Kōkan, Tsurumi, laid down on October 1, 1942, launched on July 16, 1943, and commissioned on October 30, 1943. Sunk by torpedoes from the USS Threadfin on March 28, 1945, with all 216 men aboard, after probably helping sink the USS Trigger.[2]
  • Miyake (三宅), constructed at Nihon Kōkan, Tsurumi, laid down on February 12, 1943, launched on August 30, 1943, and commissioned on November 30, 1943. Miyake was sold for scrap on July 2, 1948.[3]
  • Awaji (淡路), constructed at Hitachi, Sakurajima, and laid down on June 1, 1943, launched on October 30, 1943, and completed on February 15, 1944. Torpedoed on June 2, 1944 by USS Guitarro with the loss of 76 men.[4]
  • Kurahashi (倉橋), constructed at Nihon Kōkan, Tsurumi, being laid down on June 1, 1943, launched on October 15, 1943 and commissioned on March 10, 1944. On January 16, 1945, Kurahashi was damaged by near misses from TF 38 carrier aircraft that killed 2 and wounded 14. She survived the war and was ceded to the UK as a war reparation on September 14, 1947 and shortly after was sold for scrapping.[5]
  • Nomi (能美), constructed at Nihon Kōkan, Tsurumi, being laid down on August 10, 1943, launched on December 3, 1943, and commissioned on March 15, 1944. Sunk on April 14, 1945, by two torpedoes from the USS Tirante, that hit her under her bridge and sank her with the loss of 134 men as she was attacking the submarine.[6]
  • Chiburi (千振), constructed at Nihon Kōkan, Tsurumi, laid down on July 20, 1943, launched on November 30, 1943 and commissioned on May 13, 1944. Sunk in an air attack on January 12, 1945, losing 88 men.[7]
  • Yashiro (屋代), constructed at Hitachi, Sakurajima, laid down on November 18, 1943, launched on February 16, 1944, and commissioned on June 6, 1944. Yashiro survived the war and was ceded to China on August 29, 1947, being renamed Cheng An before being discarded in 1954.[8]
  • Kusagaki (草垣), constructed at Nihon Kōkan, Tsurumi, laid down on September 7, 1943, launched on January 12, 1944, and commissioned on July 1, 1944. Sunk on August 7, 1944, by torpedoes from USS Guitarro, with the loss of 97 men.[9]

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