Paulding-class destroyer

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USSPauldingdd22.jpg
USS Paulding (DD-22)
Class overview
Name: Paulding-class destroyer
Operators:  United States Navy
 United States Coast Guard
Preceded by: Smith-class destroyer
Succeeded by: Cassin-class destroyer
Completed: 21
Retired: 21
Preserved: 0
General characteristics
Type: Destroyer
Displacement: 742 tons (normal)
887 tons (full load)
Length: 293 ft 0 in (89.31 m) overall
Beam: 26 ft 3 in (8.00 m)
Draft: 8 ft 0 in (2.44 m)
Propulsion: 4 oil-fired Normand boilers
3 Parsons steam turbines
3 shafts
12,000 ihp (8,948 kW) shaft horsepower
Speed: 29.5 knots (54.6 km/h; 33.9 mph)
Capacity: 236 tons oil (fuel)
Complement: 4 Officers
82 Enlisted
Armament: Five 3 inch/50 caliber (76 mm) guns
Six 18 inch (457 mm) torpedo tubes (3 x 2)

The Paulding-class destroyers were a modification of the Smith-class with the torpedo tubes increased from three to six via twin mounts. This was an easy upgrade, as the new design twin mounts actually weighed less than the older single mounts.[1] The 21 Pauldings doubled the number of destroyers in the US Navy. The newer class burned oil rather than coal and had 12,000 shaft horsepower (shp) instead of 10,000 shp, lightening the ships and making them about a knot faster.

Generally 21 ships, hull numbers 22 through 42, are considered Pauldings. However, some rate the hull numbers 32 through 42 as the Monaghan class. Others break hulls 24-28, 30, 31, 33 and 36 as Roe class, with hulls 32, 35, and 38-42 as Monaghan class. Curiously, Jane′s Fighting Ships of World War I refers to hulls 22-42 as the 21 [ships of the] Drayton-class, going on to say "Unofficially known as ′Flivver Type′"; the book includes Paulding in the class listing, but not as the class leader.[2]

The Paulding class derived its name from the lead ship of the series, USS Paulding (DD-22), named after Rear Admiral Hiram Paulding (1797-1878). Like the Smiths, they were nicknamed flivvers after the small and shaky Model T Ford once the larger "thousand tonner" destroyers entered service. The ships were all commissioned between 1910 and 1912, and were active throughout World War I, primarily as convoy escorts in the Atlantic . At least some of the class were equipped with one or two depth charge racks for this mission.[3]

These ships served in the United States Navy; twelve were transferred to the United States Coast Guard 1924-30 for the Rum Patrol; and all were scrapped 1934-35 to comply with the London Naval Treaty.[4]

Engineering[edit]

There was some variation in engineering among the ships of this class. The most visible was that hulls 24-27, 30-32, 34, 36, 37, 39, and 40 had three stacks instead of four, with the middle stack being larger as two boiler uptakes were trunked together in it.[5] Although most ships' turbines were arranged as in the Smith-class, hulls 26-27, 30-31, and 34 had two turbines on two shafts (Zoelly or Curtis), with cruising stages included in the turbine casings.[6] From DD-32 on, Thornycroft boilers instead of Normand were equipped.[7]

Ships in class[edit]

The 21 ships of the Paulding class were:[8]

Ship Shipyard Laid down Launched Commissioned Decommissioned Fate
USS Paulding (DD-22) Bath Iron Works 24 July 1909 12 April 1910 29 September 1910 August 1919 USCG 1924-30, scrapped 1934
USS Drayton (DD-23) Bath Iron Works 1909 22 August 1910 29 October 1910 17 November 1919 Scrapped 1935
USS Roe (DD-24) Newport News 3 August 1908 24 July 1909 17 September 1910 December 1919 USCG 1924-30, scrapped 1934
USS Terry (DD-25) Newport News 8 February 1909 21 August 1909 18 October 1910 13 November 1919 USCG 1924-30, scrapped 1934
USS Perkins (DD-26) Fore River Ship and Engine 22 March 1909 9 April 1910 18 November 1910 5 December 1919 Scrapped 1935
USS Sterett (DD-27) Fore River Ship and Engine 22 March 1909 12 May 1910 15 December 1910 9 December 1919 Scrapped 1935
USS McCall (DD-28) New York Shipbuilding 8 June 1909 4 June 1910 23 January 1911 12 December 1919 USCG 1924-30, scrapped 1934
USS Burrows (DD-29) New York Shipbuilding 19 June 1909 23 June 1910 21 February 1911 12 December 1919 USCG 1925-31, scrapped 1934
USS Warrington (DD-30) William Cramp & Sons 21 June 1909 18 June 1910 20 March 1911 31 January 1920 Scrapped 1935
USS Mayrant (DD-31) William Cramp & Sons 22 April 1909 23 April 1910 12 July 1911 12 December 1919 Scrapped 1935
USS Monaghan (DD-32) Newport News 1 June 1910 18 February 1911 21 June 1911 4 November 1919 USCG 1924-31, scrapped 1934
USS Trippe (DD-33) Bath Iron Works 12 April 1910 20 December 1910 23 March 1911 6 November 1919 USCG 1924-31, scrapped 1934
USS Walke (DD-34) Fore River Ship and Engine 5 March 1910 3 November 1910 22 July 1911 12 December 1919 Scrapped 1935
USS Ammen (DD-35) New York Shipbuilding 29 March 1910 20 September 1910 23 May 1911 11 December 1919 USCG 1924-31, scrapped 1934
USS Patterson (DD-36) William Cramp & Sons 29 March 1910 29 April 1911 11 October 1911 1 January 1919 USCG 1924-30, scrapped 1934
USS Fanning (DD-37) Newport News 1911 11 January 1912 21 June 1912 24 November 1919 USCG 1924-30, scrapped 1934
USS Jarvis (DD-38) New York Shipbuilding 1 July 1911 4 April 1912 22 October 1912 26 November 1919 Scrapped 1935
USS Henley (DD-39) Fore River Ship and Engine 1911 3 April 1912 6 December 1912 12 December 1919 USCG 1924-31, scrapped 1934
USS Beale (DD-40) William Cramp & Sons 8 May 1911 30 April 1912 30 August 1912 25 October 1919 USCG 1924-30, scrapped 1934
USS Jouett (DD-41) Bath Iron Works 7 March 1911 15 April 1912 24 May 1912 24 November 1919 USCG 1924-31, scrapped 1935
USS Jenkins (DD-42) Bath Iron Works 24 March 1911 29 April 1912 15 June 1912 31 October 1919 Scrapped 1935

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Friedman, p. 27
  2. ^ (2001) Jane's Fighting Ships of World War I, pg. 147. Random House, London. ISBN 1-85170-378-0
  3. ^ Friedman, p. 68
  4. ^ Gardiner, p. 122
  5. ^ Friedman, p. 27
  6. ^ Friedman, p. 26-27
  7. ^ Gardiner, p. 122
  8. ^ http://destroyerhistory.org/early/pauldingclass/ DestroyerHistory.org Paulding class destroyer

External links[edit]