Radiobinding assay

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A radiobinding assay is a method of detecting and quantifying antibodies targeted towards a specific antigen. As such, it can be seen as the inverse of radioimmunoassay, which quantifies an antigen by use of corresponding antibodies.

Technique[edit]

The corresponding antigen is radiolabeled and mixed with the fluid that may contain the antibody, such as blood serum from a person. Presence of antibodies cause precipitation of antibody-antigen complexes that can be collected by centrifugation into pellets. The amount of antibody is proportional to the radioactivity of the pellet, as determined by gamma counting.[1]

Uses[edit]

It is used to detect most autoantibodies seen in latent autoimmune diabetes.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Anti-dsDNA [I-125] Radiobinding Assay Kit At PerkinElmer Life Sciences, Inc. Retrieved Jan 2011
  2. ^ Knip, M.; Veijola, R.; Virtanen, S. M.; Hyoty, H.; Vaarala, O.; Akerblom, H. K. (2005). "Environmental Triggers and Determinants of Type 1 Diabetes". Diabetes 54: S125–S136. doi:10.2337/diabetes.54.suppl_2.S125. PMID 16306330.  edit