Stand by Your Man

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For the song "Stand by Your Man" by LL Cool J, see Stand by Your Man (LL Cool J song). For the 1992 TV series, see Stand by Your Man (TV series).
"Stand by Your Man"
Single by Tammy Wynette
from the album Stand by Your Man
B-side "I Stayed Long Enough"
Released September 1968 (U.S.)
1975 (U.K.)
Format 7"
Recorded August 28, 1968
Genre Country
Length 2:38
Label Epic 10398
Writer(s) Billy Sherrill, Tammy Wynette
Producer(s) Billy Sherrill
Tammy Wynette singles chronology
"D-I-V-O-R-C-E"
(1968)
"Stand by Your Man"
(1968)
"Singing My Song"
(1969)

"Stand by Your Man" is a song co-written by Tammy Wynette and Billy Sherrill and originally recorded by Wynette, released as a single in the United States in September 1968. It proved to be the most successful record of Wynette's career, and is one of the most covered songs in the history of country music. The song was placed at number one on CMT's list of the Top 100 Country Music Songs.

Released as a single in late 1968, the song reached number one on the U.S. country charts in late 1968 for three weeks.[1] "Stand by Your Man" also crossed over to the U.S. pop charts, peaking at number nineteen.[2] It elevated Wynette—then one of many somewhat successful female country recording artists—to superstar status. It reached number one in the UK Singles Chart when the record was finally released in Britain in 1975,[3] subsequently also reaching number one in the Netherlands. An album of the same name—which was also quite successful—was released in 1968.

The song was selected by the Library of Congress as a 2010 addition to the National Recording Registry, which selects recordings annually that are "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".[4]

Background and writing[edit]

"Stand by Your Man" was reportedly written in the Epic studios in 1968 in all of 15 minutes, from an idea that came from Wynette's producer, Billy Sherrill, one of the two writers credited, along with Wynette. Tammy was not very fond of the song at first because it was unlike anything she had ever written before, and because there is a high note that was hard for her to sing. She said that, over time, she got to love the song, and came to the point where she "couldn't do a show without it." Sherrill originally stated that, before "Stand by Your Man"'s release, he thought that Wynette's "D-I-V-O-R-C-E" would be Wynette's signature song. However, after witnessing how successful the song came to be in America during that time, Sherrill then agreed that "Stand by Your Man" was definitely Wynette's career hit.

Content[edit]

Derided by the Feminist movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s, Wynette in later years defended the song as not a call for women to place themselves second to men, but rather a suggestion that women attempt to overlook their husbands' shortcomings and faults if they truly love them (and in fact, the last line in the final verse says "after all, he's just a man"). Wynette always defended her signature song. The song remained contentious into the early 1990s, when soon-to-be First Lady Hillary Clinton told CBS' 60 Minutes during the 'Gennifer Flowers' interview that she "wasn't some little woman 'standing by my man' like Tammy Wynette." The condemnation from the public was immediate, even coming from Wynette herself.

In popular culture[edit]

The song appeared at the beginning of the Academy-Award nominated 1970 film Five Easy Pieces, starring Jack Nicholson and Karen Black. Additionally appeared in The Blues Brothers (1980) (in which it was sung by Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi), and at the end of the Academy-Award-winning 1992 film The Crying Game (in which it was sung by Lyle Lovett). The song resurfaced again in a string of other early 1990s films, including Sleepless in Seattle (1993), Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994), and GoldenEye (1995).

The song is referenced in songs by British punk rock groups The Slits ("Typical Girls") and The Clash ("Train in Vain").

"Stand by Your Man" is the title song of the German comedy show Dittsche.

The song appears on the game Karaoke Revolution Country.

In 2003, "Stand by Your Man" was rated number one on CMT's 100 Greatest Songs in Country Music. In 2004, "Stand by Your Man" was rated number sixteen on CMT's 100 Greatest Country Love Songs.

In 1968, Italian singer Palma Calderoni recorded this song with Italian text, written by Mogol and Claudio Daiano (title is Io voglio te).

The song was spoofed on Sesame Street as "Stand By Your Can". It was performed by Hammy Swinette, a porcine parody of Wynette, who—with the help of a Muppet trash can—urges people to put their trash in a trash can.[5]

The song was also use during the episode "Hatless" of the first season of Justified.

The song also appears in an episode of the popular 2008 show "Gossip Girl", where an embarrassing video of Blair Waldorf singing "Stand By Your Man" is played at her 21st birthday party.

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (1968) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles 1
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 19
U.S. Billboard Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks 11
Canadian RPM Country Tracks 1
Canadian RPM Top Singles 15
Australian Go-Set Chart 9[6]
Chart (1975) Peak
position
UK Singles Chart[3] 1
Irish Singles Chart 1
Dutch Top 40 1[7]
Belgian VRT Top 30 1
New Zealand Singles Chart 31[7]
Chart (1998) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks 56[8]

Certifications[edit]

Country Provider Certification
United Kingdom BPI Gold

Cover versions[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book Of Top 40 Country Hits: 1944-2006, Second edition. Record Research. p. 399. 
  2. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits: Eighth Edition. Record Research. p. 690. 
  3. ^ a b Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. pp. 313–4. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. 
  4. ^ "The National Recording Registry 2010". Library of Congress. Retrieved April 10, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Sesame Street: Stand By Your Can". YouTube. Retrieved 2014-03-27. 
  6. ^ "Go-Set Australian charts - 16 April 1969". Poparchives.com.au. 1969-04-16. Retrieved 2014-03-27. 
  7. ^ a b Steffen Hung. "Tammy Wynette - Stand By Your Man". swedishcharts.com. Retrieved 2014-03-27. 
  8. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2013). Hot Country Songs 1944–2012. Record Research, Inc. p. 383. ISBN 978-0-89820-203-8. 
  9. ^ "Candi Staton Discography". The Soul of the Net. www.melingo.com. Retrieved 2010-10-11. 
  10. ^ "Just like a woman". Svensk mediedatabas (SMDB) (in Swedish). National Library of Sweden. Retrieved 2010-10-11. 
  11. ^ [1][dead link]
  12. ^ "RPM Country Tracks". RPM. January 24, 1994. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
Preceded by
"I Walk Alone"
by Marty Robbins
Billboard Hot Country Singles
number-one single

November 23, 1968 - December 7, 1968
Succeeded by
"Born to Be with You"
by Sonny James
Preceded by
"Where Love Used to Live"
by David Houston
RPM Country Tracks
number-one single

December 9, 1968
Succeeded by
"Little Arrows"
by Leapy Lee
Preceded by
"Oh Boy"
by Mud
UK number-one single
May 17-May 31, 1975
Succeeded by
"Whispering Grass"
by Windsor Davies and Don Estelle