TMZ on TV

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TMZ on TV
TMZLogo.svg
Format Tabloid/entertainment program
Created by Harvey Levin
Jim Paratore
Starring Harvey Levin
(for information on other TMZ staffers appearing on the program, see On-air cast)
Theme music composer Jason Brandt
Composer(s) Michael A. Muhammad
Michael Egizi
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 5
Production
Executive producer(s) Harvey Levin (2007–present)
Jim Paratore (2007–2012)
Charles Latibeaudiere (2013–present)
Evan Rosenblum (2013–present)
Location(s) TMZ headquarters, 13031 W. Jefferson Boulevard, Los Angeles, California
Camera setup Multi-camera
Running time 22 minutes
Production company(s) TMZ.com
Harvey Levin Productions
Paramedia
Telepictures Productions
Warner Bros. Television
Distributor Warner Bros. Television Distribution
Broadcast
Original channel Syndicated
Picture format 480i (SDTV),
1080i (HDTV)
Original run September 10, 2007 – present
Chronology
Related shows TMZ Live
External links
tmz.com/tmztv

TMZ on TV (also known simply as TMZ or TMZTV) is an American syndicated entertainment and gossip news television show that premiered on September 10, 2007. The program is generally aired on Fox, CW and MyNetworkTV affiliates (along with a few affiliates of other major networks), though a majority of the stations that carry the series are Fox affiliates. It is essentially a television version of its sister operation, TMZ.com, a news website with a heavy emphasis on gossip of celebrities' personal lives, which debuted in December 2005.

The television program is produced at studio facilities that serve as the headquarters for the parent website, located at 13031 West Jefferson Boulevard in Los Angeles, California.[1] TMZ is an insider term ("thirty-mile zone" or studio zone), referring to the movie studio area of downtown Hollywood.

On October 23, 2013, Warner Bros. Television Distribution announced that the program's charter station group, Fox Television Stations, renewed TMZ on TV through the 2016–17 season.[2]

Format[edit]

TMZ on TV is broadcast in two formats: the weekday edition is broadcast as a half-hour program; a one-hour weekend edition, composed of select stories featured in each of the weekday editions from the previous week, is also produced; during major holidays occurring on a weekday, that episode may feature a format similar to the weekend edition but featuring a compilation of stories from past editions centered around a particular theme (for example, a Christmas episode may center on celebrities who have been bad or good in the past year).

Unlike most entertainment news programs, TMZ on TV does not use a format of anchors in a studio delivering the stories and correspondents reporting on many of the stories in each edition; instead, most story packages are delivered via an announcer, and "in-studio" segments are taped during a morning staff pitch meeting at TMZ's Jefferson Boulevard headquarters, with some TMZ staffers delivering story pieces themselves.

The series delivers most of its stories in a humorous manner, mainly about certain celebrities, and features tongue-in-cheek jokes and double entendres, though more serious entertainment stories (such as a breaking entertainment story or celebrity death) – which appear on the program sparingly – often warrant a serious tone. Pieces often feature archived clips from television series and movies often for comedic effect, though they may sometimes be used to reference a project that an entertainer is known for performing in. Many pieces are shown in the "man on the street"-type question and answer format synonymous with paparazzi, though some celebrities do not answer certain questions asked to them by the videographer; a common recurring reference within the program is how certain TMZ videographers sometimes ask extremely trivial or bad questions to their subject.

In lieu of regular daily segments such as a rumor mill segment, the program often shows recurring segments that appear over several episodes that feature a humorous or satirical introduction (for example, after the Tiger Woods adultery scandal broke in November 2009, all stories involving Woods began with the introduction: "TNN: The Tiger News Network", using a logo and name parodying that of cable news channel CNN – a sister company to TMZ.com and the distributors of the television series, Warner Bros. Television and Telepictures, via Time Warner); however for the first few weeks of the show's run, the series carried a daily segment called "Full Frontal Fashion", featuring celebrity fashion blunders, but it was dropped after roughly one month.[citation needed]

On-air cast[edit]

Certain members of the TMZ website double as the on-air cast:

  • Harvey Levinexecutive producer
  • Charles Latibeaudiere – executive producer
  • Evan Rosenblum – executive producer
  • Chad Weiser – post-production producer
  • Tiffany Drucker – line producer
  • Dax Holt – clearance producer
  • Rick Mitchell – producer
  • Gary Trock – senior news producer
  • Ryan Regan – supervising producer/director
  • Brian Particelli – producer
  • Chris Reed – producer/announcer
  • Jim Goldenberg – producer/announcer
  • Noah Belson – producer
  • Van Lathan – sports producer
  • Anthony Dominic – news producer
  • Karly Steinberg – news producer
  • Dennis J. Broad – research director
  • Kelly Berning – editor
  • Brian McDaniel – editor
  • Eric Colley – editor
  • Casey Carver – publicist
  • Anna Kachikyan – post production coordinator
  • Shevonne Sullivan – post production supervisor
  • Mike Walters – news director
  • Ryan Satin – senior news producer
  • Charlie Neff – news associate producer
  • Raquel Harper – news producer
  • Johnny Walker – cameraman
  • Adam Glyn – cameraman
  • Peter O'Riordan – assignment manager
  • Kristen Gill – clearance coordinator
  • Derek Kaufman – lawyer
  • Jason Beckerman – lawyer
  • John Viener – voiceover/announcer

Notable former cast members[edit]

Criticism[edit]

In October 2011, the staff was showing off Halloween costumes and one staff member was dressed with a garbage bag over her head. She stated she was "Slutty Caylee Anthony" a deceased two-year-old toddler. She then jokingly asked if it was "too soon?"[4]

Broadcasting stolen material[edit]

TMZ was criticized for purchasing stolen items pertaining to the fourth Indiana Jones film. On October 2, 2007, IESB reported that a number of production photos and sensitive documents pertaining to the production budget had been stolen from Steven Spielberg's production office.

According to IESB, TMZ.com obtained some of the stolen property and was on the verge of running the story on the TV show until Paramount lawyers stepped in. After IESB broke the story, TMZ on TV broadcast details about the Indiana Jones production budget on the October 3, 2007 program.[5][6]

Parodies[edit]

  • On August 26, 2009, 3rd Degree Films released a pornographic film based on TMZ called TM Sleaze. The film "turns up the heat and the humor as you get to see what happens when celebrities get engaged in hardcore humping", and features porn actors including Ron Jeremy, Lisa Ann, Tori Black, and Faye Reagan.[7]
  • Originating in 2009 on the short-lived NBC primetime talk show The Jay Leno Show and was used from 2010-2014 on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, comedian Mikey Day performs a sketch called "JMZ"; in it, Day and his "camera crew" track down celebrities (some actual celebrities appear in the sketch, while impersonators whose faces are not shown are shown sometimes in the sketch), which end up with Day involved in strange situations.
  • "Weird Al" Yankovic wrote a song in 2011, "TMZ", about the website and TV show on his album Alpocalypse.

Broadcast[edit]

In Canada TMZ is shown on CTV and CTV Two. In Australia it was broadcast on cable/satellite channel Arena until October 2008. It began broadcasting on the digital-only free-to-air channel GO! on 9 August 2009.

References[edit]

External links[edit]