Talk:Angels in Judaism

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Malakh, melek, Moloch, malik[edit]

What is the relation between the Semitic words Malakh (Hebrew for angel), melek (Hebrew for king), Moloch (disputed Phoenician god or sacrifice), malik (Arabic for king), Melek Taus (the Yazidi angel), Solomon Molcho ("Solomon King/Angel", a Jewish Messiah claimant)? User:Shirahadasha has removed my See also link in this article for not having references. I am no expert on these languages, so I ask that somebody knowledgeable, explains in the corresponding articles whether the words are related or not. I found however:

mal'ak:
Strong's Number: 04397
from an unused root meaning to despatch as a deputy
Mal'ak TWOT - 1068a
1. messenger, representative
1. messenger
2. angel
3. the theophanic angel
moloch: melek
Melek:
Strong's Number: 04428
from (04427)
Melek TWOT - 1199a
1. king
King James Word Usage - Total: 2523: king 2518, royal 2, Hammelech 1, Malcham 1, Moloch 1
Malak
Strong's Number: 04427
a primitive root
Malak TWOT - 1199,1200
1. to be or become king or queen, reign
1. (Qal) to be or become king or queen, reign
2. (Hiphil) to make one king or queen, cause to reign
3. (Hophal) to be made king or queen
2. to counsel, advise
1. (Niphal) to consider

--84.20.17.84 10:23, 23 May 2007 (UTC)

Hi! The source you provided shows that malakh (messenger or angel) and melekh (king) come from completely different Hebrew roots. This isn't surprising, because they're spelled with different Hebrew letters which happen to sound the same in Modern Hebrew due to phonetic simplifications and hence result in similar-looking English transliterations. Please do be careful to look these things up before adding content of this nature to Wikipedia. If you're not familiar enough with the sources involved to be able to use and interpret entries like this, it might be best not to attempt to add this type of material. Best, --Shirahadasha 04:08, 25 May 2007 (UTC)

Would you care to add notes to the relevant articles to avoid future misunderstandings? --84.20.17.84 08:01, 25 May 2007 (UTC)
No, it doesn't show they come from "completely different" roots. All they tooliken is one -alef. mem as prefix is the agentive or participal fitt. One person is the counsellee and other the counsellor. See herald. I'v filled out the history of the stems. -lysdexia 05:35, 5 September 2010 (UTC) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.86.166.34 (talk)

Malachi[edit]

Since there is no other article about the word "Malakh", I think that some mention that the word is also used as a proper noun or as "messenger" (depending on your interpretation) in the book of Malachi should go in the article. --84.20.17.84 08:03, 25 May 2007 (UTC)

A disambig can be added to the top to steer readers to the relevant article if there is a risk of confusion. Content about Malakhi should go in Malakhi and/or Book of Malachi. This is an encyclopedia article on the concept, not a dictionary entry on the word. --Shirahadasha 15:06, 25 May 2007 (UTC)

Song[edit]

On Etti Ankri's 2001 album "Yam" (Sea) the last song is also called Malakhim. Just FWIW. -andy 78.51.89.40 (talk) 17:24, 23 March 2008 (UTC)

Badly-written, uncited and unclear, thus disputable, entry under "etymology" title[edit]

please note that in other languages mal'akh means locust its somtimes used as connotatin for the christian demon 'legion'

Above moved here for a pile of reasons stated in the title. Feel free to clean it up to Wikipedia's standards to put it back. Please do NOT put it back verbatim. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.82.142.13 (talk) 00:10, 1 April 2010 (UTC)

Propose move to Angel (Judaism)[edit]

In ictu oculi (talk) 05:16, 4 September 2011 (UTC)

Just went ahead and did it, someone else can revert if there's a convincing WP:RS case presented from mainstream English language sources. Cheers In ictu oculi (talk) 05:24, 4 September 2011 (UTC)

301655722[edit]

Per a post-close comment on 301655722 Angels' AfD, the titular number (and other related numbers) can be sourced and may be worth working into this article. czar · · 07:35, 29 April 2013 (UTC)

Undue weight[edit]

I just read someone complain on soylentnews (a Slashdot imitator) about this article. As far as I can tell their complaint seems to be correct: the majority of the article about angels in Judaism is a section that is "not part of mainstream Judaism". Doesn't that create an undue weight problem? It's like having a "medicine according to Christianity" article which is predominantly about how Christian Science opposes blood transfusions, or a "religion in America" article which is predominantly about Scientology. (Hey, it's a religion, and it's in America, right?) Ken Arromdee (talk) 18:47, 25 March 2014 (UTC)