Talk:Gerardus Mercator

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Untitled[edit]

It appears someone with a very low IQ has vandalised the original - end of first para and elsewhere.

I thoughti dont like Mercator the museum was also in Rupelmonde (and I live in Kruibeke btw) — Anon.

Why was Mercator charged with heresy? Just that remark alone is not going to tell us much. — Shinobu 10:21, 5 May 2005 (UTC)

When was Mercator's Atlas published?[edit]

According to Paolo Novaresio(in The Explorers, 1996, Stewart, Tabori and Chang, ISBN 155670-495-X), "the Atlas by Gerhard Kremer, a.k.a Geradus Mercator; published in 1596" - as of now, the article claims he was dead by this time, and that in 1595 further sheets were published by his son. This should be dealt with, by some explanation of the apparently complicated publishing history of the Atlas. (The book also claims the atlas was 24 pages, BTW.) JesseW(not logged in) 01:10, 11 August 2005 (UTC)

Modern impersonation?[edit]

I move that the 'modern impersonation' picture be cut. It doesn't really look like him, plus we don't have much of an idea of what Mercator looked like anyway. Isn't the portrait at the top enough?

Dutch descent[edit]

What is meant by "Dutch"? It seems to indicate that his descent was different from where he was born or lived. The Netherlands in this period included Flanders. "Dutch descent" seems meaningless unless his descent would be non-Flemish, in which case it should be more specific. It's like saying that Churchill was an Englishman of British descent.

On the other hand, I'm not sure Rupelmonde was in Flanders - I would say Brabant - in which case Mercator would not have been Flemish. Piet 10:38, 23 November 2005 (UTC)

I've removed the Dutch descent, if anyone puts it back please be more specific. Piet 14:46, 2 January 2006 (UTC)

Pairs of globes[edit]

this seems an odd usage...

"Twenty-two such pairs of Mercator globes have survived."

Are there 44 surviving globes? I've never heard anyone refer to a globe as "a pair" as one might with pants or eyeglasses.

It says on the bottom conversation herethat it means matching terrestial & celestial globes.142.22.115.48 (talk) 18:12, 23 April 2012 (UTC)

Pronunciation[edit]

How is the name Mercator supposed to be pronounced? I've habitually used /mə'keɪtɚ/, probably partly influenced by Parallel 9, though I'm guessing this isn't the true pronunciation. I've more recently heard /'mɜ:kətɚ/. Can anybody provide evidence of how the name actually is supposed to be pronounced? -- Smjg (talk) 18:41, 24 August 2008 (UTC)

Belgian?[edit]

I changed the nationality in the intro from Belgian to "France and Holy Roman Empire". The reason is that Belgium did not exist in the 16th century; it was founded in 1830. Mercator's birth place was in France; he then moved to Duisburg in the Holy Roman Empire, so naming both of those countries is the best solution. Of course, there was really no concept of nationality in the 16th century, so this must remain somewhat arbitrary; but it would certianly be misleading to refer to a country that didn't exist yet. Chl (talk) 22:55, 13 February 2009 (UTC)

Insert reference to his boyhood in Gangelt ?[edit]

Hi, I've just been reading Nicholas Crane's book on Mercator and note that, although he was born in Rupelmonde near Antwerp, he spent the first five to six years of his life in the town of Gangelt, in modern Germany. His parents had gone to Rupelmonde to escape the effects of a failed harvest in 1511 and returned to Gangelt in 1512, before finally returning in 1517. I suggest that this be worked into the article. Scartboy (talk) 17:00, 29 August 2009 (UTC)

Globe making[edit]

The method of making globes out of papier-mâché was not developed by Mercator but was already being used by Johannes Schöner at the beginning of the 16th century. Schöner was the first to mass produce printed pairs of globes (matching celestial and terrestrial globes) and Gemma Frisius, who taught Mercator how to make globes, copied Schöner's globes. Thony C. (talk) 17:45, 11 April 2012 (UTC)