Talk:List of Combined Statistical Areas

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New February 2013 delineations[edit]

There are some new changes in the CSAs and this page ought to be updated, accordingly... In particular, the Milwaukee-Racine-Waukesha, WI Combined Statistical Area now includes the following:

Beaver Dam, WI Micropolitan Statistical Area Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI Metropolitan Statistical Area Racine, WI Metropolitan Statistical Area Watertown-Fort Atkinson, WI Micropolitan Statistical Area Whitewater-Elkhorn, WI Micropolitan Statistical Area

Please update all pages with updated stats ASAP — Preceding unsigned comment added by Maximilian77 (talkcontribs) 03:36, 13 March 2013 (UTC)

Area Data[edit]

Anyway to include the area for the CMAs? It would help in comparing them 99.180.247.197 (talk) 23:01, 11 January 2012 (UTC)CandaceSue

Ranks incorrect?[edit]

Why aren't the ranks using standard counting numbers? Lots of numbers are being skipped over. Stevie is the man! TalkWork 15:59, 20 June 2007 (UTC)

The rank numbers are the rank of the Combined Statistical Area among the U.S. primary census statistical areas which includes all CSAs plus all MSAs and μSAs which are not a component of a CSA. See the Table of United States primary census statistical areas. --Buaidh 17:05, 20 June 2007 (UTC)
Can't we just rank by CSA? Wouldn't that be more clear? Stevie is the man! TalkWork 17:10, 20 June 2007 (UTC)
Since 69 of the 100 largest metropolitan areas are Combined Statistical Areas, I though most folks would be more interested in the rank of each CSA among all the metropolitan areas of the United States. Not all the largest metropolitan areas are CSAs though. The Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL MSA ranks 11th, the Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ MSA ranks 13th, the San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, CA MSA ranks 16th, and the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL MSA ranks 20th among all primary census statistical areas. --Buaidh 17:32, 20 June 2007 (UTC)
I see your point, but it is still confusing from a common reader's perspective. The CSA ranks feel bogus when they're being mixed with MSA ranks, since as you say, not all the largest MSAs correspond to CSAs. I was thinking along the lines of "amongst CSAs only" but I realize that leaving out non-CSA-bound MSAs would skew the results. The bottom line is that I'm not sure how to report a rank from this article in a specific CSA article. Stevie is the man! TalkWork 17:43, 20 June 2007 (UTC)
The United States Census Bureau (USCB) has created 939 Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs), which include the 363 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) plus the 576 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (μSAs). The USCB has also created 123 Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs), which are composed of two or more CBSAs. Altogether, the 123 CSAs contain 177 MSAs and 167 μSAs. The 123 CSAs plus the remaining 186 MSAs and 409 μSAs that are not included in a CSA are called primary census statistical areas (PCSAs) since they belong to no higher level census area. I would report the Cincinnati-Middletown-Wilmington, OH-KY-IN CSA as the 25th most populous U.S. metropolitan area. To report the Cincinnati-Middletown-Wilmington, OH-KY-IN CSA as the 21st most populous Combined Statistical Area ignores the four MSAs above which are more populous. Unfortunately the Wikipedia article for United States metropolitan area has been combined with the article for Metropolitan Statistical Area, thus creating all this confusion. These two articles should be separated to avoid this confusion. --Buaidh 18:45, 20 June 2007 (UTC)

I agree with the above comment. The table as it currently looks, with no #11, #13, and some others, just looks weird. Funnyhat 20:31, 20 June 2007 (UTC)

The Table of United States primary census statistical areas lists the rank of all (highest level) metropolitan areas of the United States. I would suggest that you use that table for ranking metropolitan areas rather than this table. This table is primarily for locating the CSAs within the PCSAs. I could list both the rank among PCSAs and the rank among just CSAs, but I think that would really confuse people. --Buaidh 20:44, 20 June 2007 (UTC)
It strikes me as more confusing to skip numbers on the current page. What really would alleviate this problem is better-defining the "rank" column. I'm conditioned to assume that a generic "Rank" column would be the rank in terms of the subject of the list, not in terms of a different list on a different page.--12.47.123.121 23:42, 31 July 2007 (UTC)


Gee, what credibility for Wikipedia. Portland Oregon isn't even on the list. You can't trust the information that is posted on Wikipedia. You should really make that clear as a disclaimer for people expecting factual information on this farce. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.236.230.213 (talk) 02:31, 17 June 2010 (UTC)

Missing numbers[edit]

The Phoenix Metropolitan area should be listed at #13 but is missing from the list. The list goes from #12 to #14. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 199.168.7.243 (talk) 13:41, August 30, 2007 (UTC)

As of the date I write this, the Portland (OR) Metro area is also not listed.

Phoenix is missing from the list the list is incomplete Phoenix has over 4 million in its metro area. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.94.171.87 (talk) 03:10, 27 August 2011 (UTC)

Miami/ South Florida is missing from this list. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Tabromo (talkcontribs) 04:49, 12 February 2008 (UTC)

The Census Bureau only defines a Combined Statistical Area if a two or more adjacent Core Based Statistical Areas have effectively merged. Many large metropolitan areas such as Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL MSA, Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ MSA, San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, CA MSA, Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL MSA, Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, OR-WA MSA, and San Antonio, TX MSA do not have a defined CSA. Please see the Table of United States primary census statistical areas for a comparison of all U.S. metropolitan areas. --Buaidh (talk) 04:06, 4 April 2008 (UTC)
That's not quite right. A CSA is a group of CBSAs that share commuters. If they were effectively merged, they would become a single CBSA. The delineation rules have criteria for merging and for combining, which are two different things. It is misleading to treat a CSA as a single metropolitan area. --Polaron | Talk 23:56, 3 April 2009 (UTC)

Springfield, MO Metropolitan Area, population 436,712 is missing. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 144.160.98.31 (talk) 06:19, 8 December 2012 (UTC)

2008 population estimates[edit]

I updated the table with United States Census Bureau estimates for July 1, 2008. Please do not alter the table. I reduced the length of this article to 31 KiB. I will update the table with the Census Bureau estimates for July 1, 2009, about March 31, 2010. Yours aye, Buaidh (talk) 16:32, 25 September 2009 (UTC)

Anchorage[edit]

I thought this list was going to include the Anchorage,alaska region

casue anchorage county is the core of this area and the county to the north Matanuska-Sustina and Kenai Pennisula cook inlet county can be joined together to form a CSA and this chart is not showing it.alaska should have different rules casue there only like a dozen or so counties for a state thats a third as big as the contenental US

The Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area is currently listed as #126 on the Table of United States primary census statistical areas and #137 on the Table of United States Metropolitan Statistical Areas and the Table of United States Core Based Statistical Areas. The State of Alaska has boroughs rather than counties. Yours aye, Buaidh (talk) 15:27, 28 September 2009 (UTC)


Austin-Round Rock-Marble Falls, TX Combined Statistical Area[edit]

This is a newly (Dec. 2009) formed CSA, which is a combination of the Austin-Round Rock-San Marcos, TX Metropolitan Statistical Area (also renamed), and the newly formed Marble Falls, TX Micropolitan Statistical Area. It has a 2008 estimated population of 1,697,090, placing it in this list at number 28. Would someone please add this newly formed CSA?[1] —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.177.102.147 (talk) 00:29, 6 December 2009 (UTC)

I updated the table to include the Austin-Round Rock-Marble Falls, TX CSA. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Scottolini (talkcontribs) 23:32, 5 January 2010 (UTC)

Austin also needs to be added to the map.Null Space 0 (talk) 15:38, 7 December 2011 (UTC)

Has Austin been removed? I can't find it on the list but it is certainly on the map from the article... — Preceding unsigned comment added by Mitchheard (talkcontribs) 18:35, 27 May 2014 (UTC)

CSA/MSA list[edit]

Greetings,

Before the Office of Management and Budget broke up the "CMSA" Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area) system in the 1990s, the CMSA list was considered the de facto ranking list for U.S. metropolitan areas.

This current list is lacking because it does not include places like Miami and Phoenix. Further, it's a bit of a sham to consider Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach to NOT be a multi-core area...especially for West Palm Beach.

The current "metropolitan area" list is a bit deceptive. I suggest someone create a combined CSA/MSA list.Ryoung122 21:59, 16 August 2010 (UTC)

That list is available at the Table of United States primary census statistical areas. Yours aye,  Buaidh  21:20, 12 January 2012 (UTC)

Move discussion in progress[edit]

There is a move discussion in progress on Talk:Statistical area which affects this page. Please participate on that page and not in this talk page section. Thank you. —RMCD bot 17:55, 15 August 2012 (UTC)

2012 Data release[edit]

Hi all just wanted to let those that want to get cracking that 2012 data has been released here and the quick and dirty CSV file here. Market St.⧏ ⧐ Diamond Way 18:35, 14 March 2013 (UTC)

Please help relink[edit]

On February 28, 2013, the United States Office of Management and Budget defined, renamed, and redefined a large number of United States Statistical Areaa. Please help relink the red-linked Statistical Areas to the appropriate metropolitan area article. If the Statistical Area comprises only one county, please link to that county. Thank you,  Buaidh  14:16, 18 March 2013 (UTC)

Charleston, SC CSA Missing[edit]

Any others missing? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.37.243.153 (talk) 23:23, 25 October 2014 (UTC)