Talk:List of mountains and hills of Japan by height

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Japan (Rated List-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of the WikiProject Japan, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Japan-related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the project and see a list of open tasks. Current time in Japan: 09:09, January 31, 2015 (JST, Heisei 27) (Refresh)
 List  This article has been rated as List-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Mountains (Rated List-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is part of WikiProject Mountains, a project to systematically present information on mountains. If you would like to participate, you can choose to edit the article attached to this page (see Contributing FAQ for more information), or visit the project page where you can join the project and/or contribute to the discussion.
 List  This article has been rated as List-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

So, what is a mountain, anyway?[edit]

Anxious to add a couple of mountains from Miyagi Prefecture to this list, I went to ja:Category:宮城県の山 to see what some of the official names were. Surprisingly, there were several "mountains" which I knew about, and knew were called ○○山, but didn't think that they would ever be classified as an actual mountain. The most egregious example of this is ja:日和山 (宮城県仙台市), which used to be Japan's shortest classified mountain at 6.05 meters. But, apparently, the the Geographical Survey Institute of Japan also classifies ja:天保山 as a man-made mountain at 4.53 meters. I suppose that the GSI has some criteria that they have used to decide that these two areas (and many more) are actually mountains; but, I am a bit reluctant to add mountains to this list which are smaller than the bonfire we built my freshman year in college.  :-) Should we set a limit for inclusion in this list (500, 900 or 1000 meters?), while making special mention of 天保山 and 日和山 as well as the GSI classification system? Or, is it ok to just copy over the mountains from the ja: categories? (either way, I think it is good to add the Japanese names for these mountains; especially the ones without En: articles) Neier 09:48, 5 January 2007 (UTC)

I don't think mountains are mountains just because of their size. Geological features probably hold larger sway when it comes to determining whether or not something is actually a mountain. That's why there are some really short mountains out there. (Man-made mountains have their own rules, I'm assuming.) Douggers 06:32, 25 October 2007 (UTC)

New table format (Idea ver.0)[edit]

Hi,

User:Alpsdake has been updating this list in a new format. I am not sure this is the best format. I have the following problems:

  • The first column is an ordinal list that restarts at 1 for each subsection. This is a list by height, so a height ranking is of secondary importance. I would leave the numbering off for two reasons. a) I think the list should focus on the height and the name. b) Until we have a complete list of all mountains, adding new mountains to the list is a logistical nightmare. If I add an unlisted mountain, I must renumber all entries after it, nevermind the likelihood that I will make a mistake while doing so.
  • The picture while pretty is not really of primary importance to the list. With the list I want a clean overview and not be distracted by the color image. Save the color image for the article.
  • The referrence to the JA wiki for mountain that do not have articles is the wrong way to go. Instead of investing effort into linking to the JA wiki, create a stub article for the mountain and use the Interwiki link to link back to the JA:wiki.
  • The old list is easier to maintain, having but a single line for every row in the table.
  • The old list looks "cleaner", and is easier to scan, not having the cell borders.

Having said the bad things, I want to praise User:Alpsdake for the effort he put in, attempting to improve the list. I do think the notes section is a good idea.

Until we have a discussion on the topic, I am moving the content he created here and am reverting the list to its previous form.

-imars (talk) 07:54, 30 November 2010 (UTC)

I agree with imars about the ordinal numbering: it really has no point since the lists default to the highest at the top. It also (as imars pointed out) makes it more difficult to add in missing mountains (or new ones on the list, should a volcano or earthquake cause that to happen). I disagree regarding the pictures; I think having them is perfectly acceptable, though I think that column should be made non-sortable. The notes column should also be non-sortable. ···日本穣? · 投稿 · Talk to Nihonjoe · Join WikiProject Japan! 08:12, 30 November 2010 (UTC)
I am also thinking the new format of 100 Famous Japanese Mountains. There will be same opinion for it. For this I think it is better to describe the first column which is the original order of the book(from north to south). And this number will not be changed , because 100 mountains are finished. As for List of mountains and hills of Japan by height the list is not finished, so it is not easy to change the number. I think it is better to remove. This table is not easy to change , but I think it is better to add another important item. What is the important item? It will be discussed. My first idea is it. According to the opinion of the majority, the Japanese link 富士山 will be removed. Is it necessary Japanese 富士山 without link? The column is sortable or non-sortable, to sort by mountain it should be sortable. I do not know the possibility of the setting for the each column. --Alpsdake (talk) 10:03, 30 November 2010 (UTC)
I agree with Alpsdake about the ordinal column which should be removed in my opinion. I do like the images but they should go to the last (rightmost) column and the first column should contain the name of the mountain. Wikilinks should not be made to Japanese language articles. Create a stub or just leave the red links to not-yet-created-articles. Don't agree with the easier maintenance (4th item of Alpsdake's arguments). Adding/removing mountains is as easy with the table and the sorting feature which is now available outweighs the more complicated source code. Cell borders (5th item) are better now as far as I can see. You might want to check out some of the featured lists which generally do use table syntax and images. Some other suggestions: make the "prefecture" column unsortable because there are sometimes more than one prefecture. Wikilink prefectures as per WP:MOS each row of the table should stand on its own. Use the same number of decimals for every mountain in the height column. Rename "Metres" and "Feet" columns to "Height in metres" and "Height in feet" or something like it. The word "hill" only appears in the article name and nowhere else in the article. Why? Personally I am not a big fan of such (dynamic) lists which include a gigantic number of items (all the mountains of Japan in this case). I'd rather see a complete List of mountains of Japan above N metres with "N"= 3000 or 2500 or whatever makes sense. bamse (talk) 10:32, 30 November 2010 (UTC)
A little more. The mountain range column and notes column are a good idea in my opinion. The images could be a bit bigger. To save space, the metres and feet columns could be combined in one height column. bamse (talk) 10:35, 30 November 2010 (UTC)
There is another "Idea ver.2" of the format. Which is better? --Alpsdake (talk) 12:19, 30 November 2010 (UTC)

I prefer "Idea ver.2" with the following changes/suggestions:

  1. different color for the header
  2. (thin) horizontal lines make it easier to read the table in my opinion
  3. larger images
  4. wikilinks for mountain ranges
  5. no "No." column
  6. Not sure if "Japanese" column is necessary here.

bamse (talk) 18:50, 30 November 2010 (UTC)

I agreee with Bamse, especially the last three points. -imars (talk) 14:19, 1 December 2010 (UTC)
There is the improved "Idea ver.3" of the format. Larger images sample are 85px(It seems to be too big?), 70px, 60px and 50px(It seems to be too small.) The width of vertical and horizontal lines are minimum setting(border=1). I do not know the way to set thinner line. --Alpsdake (talk) 16:07, 1 December 2010 (UTC)
Better in my opinion. I left another version in my sandbox. Feel free to use this. I did the following changes compared to ver.3: use wikitable (makes lines thinner), made "Note" and "Image" columns unsortable, removed linebreaks in header (not essential), changed imagesize to 150px which actually allows to see something. The table still only fills about 80% of my (small laptop) screen width. Maybe with some more text in the note column it could fill all of the width or alternatively increase the image sizes. One more thing you might want to do is to change the cell colors of mountains that are part of the 100 Famous Mountains list. I did something like that in List of National Treasures of Japan (crafts: swords) if you want to have a look. If you do that also add superscripts ("*", "^", "#" in my case) to make the people from WP:ACCESS happy. Feel free to ask if you have any questions about this. bamse (talk) 19:04, 1 December 2010 (UTC)
Concerning the image size, it also depends on how many entries you want to have in this list. In the Lists of National Treasures of Japan (many of which are featured), I used 150px even for lists of ca. 150 entries and it was not a problem. If you have a very long list (as this might become), you could go with smaller images or just have images for the top 100 mountains or so. bamse (talk) 19:09, 1 December 2010 (UTC)

Thank the nice advice for all. I modified the Idea ver.3.

It was decided that the image did not have to be put because there were quite a lot of items in List of mountains in Japan. I want to apply this format to the list of other suitable numbers. There is the list of numwe 21 (Three-thousanders (in Japan)).

I want to apply this format for the 100 Famous Japanese Mountains. --Alpsdake (talk) 22:03, 1 December 2010 (UTC)

Idea ver.3[edit]

Mountain
Elevation
Region
Note
Image
Mt. Fuji 3,776 m (12,388 ft) Independent tallest in Japan
100 Famous -85px
01 Fujisan from Yamanakako 2004-2-7.jpg
Mt. Kita 3,193 m (10,476 ft) Southern Alps tallest in Akishi Mountains
100 Famous
Mount Kita from Mount Nakashirane 2001-10-03.JPG
Mt. Hotaka 3,190 m (10,466 ft) Northern Alps tallest in Hida Mountains
100 Famous
03 Okuhotakadake from Kitahotakadake 2000-9-3.jpg
Mt. Aino 3,189 m (10,463 ft) Southern Alps 100 Famous 04 Ainodake from Happonbanokashira 2001-10-3.jpg
Mt. Fuji 3,776 m (12,388 ft) Independent tallest in Japan
100 Famous -70px
01 Fujisan from Yamanakako 2004-2-7.jpg
Mt. Kita 3,193 m (10,476 ft) Southern Alps tallest in Akishi Mountains
100 Famous
Mount Kita from Mount Nakashirane 2001-10-03.JPG
Mt. Hotaka 3,190 m (10,466 ft) Northern Alps tallest in Hida Mountains
100 Famous
03 Okuhotakadake from Kitahotakadake 2000-9-3.jpg
Mt. Aino 3,189 m (10,463 ft) Southern Alps 100 Famous 04 Ainodake from Happonbanokashira 2001-10-3.jpg
Mt. Fuji 3,776 m (12,388 ft) Independent tallest in Japan
100 Famous -60px
01 Fujisan from Yamanakako 2004-2-7.jpg
Mt. Kita 3,193 m (10,476 ft) Southern Alps tallest in Akishi Mountains
100 Famous
Mount Kita from Mount Nakashirane 2001-10-03.JPG
Mt. Hotaka 3,190 m (10,466 ft) Northern Alps tallest in Hida Mountains
100 Famous
03 Okuhotakadake from Kitahotakadake 2000-9-3.jpg
Mt. Aino 3,189 m (10,463 ft) Southern Alps 100 Famous 04 Ainodake from Happonbanokashira 2001-10-3.jpg
Mt. Fuji 3,776 m (12,388 ft) Independent tallest in Japan
100 Famous -50px
01 Fujisan from Yamanakako 2004-2-7.jpg
Mt. Kita 3,193 m (10,476 ft) Southern Alps tallest in Akishi Mountains
100 Famous
Mount Kita from Mount Nakashirane 2001-10-03.JPG
Mt. Hotaka 3,190 m (10,466 ft) Northern Alps tallest in Hida Mountains
100 Famous
03 Okuhotakadake from Kitahotakadake 2000-9-3.jpg
Mt. Aino 3,189 m (10,463 ft) Southern Alps 100 Famous 04 Ainodake from Happonbanokashira 2001-10-3.jpg

Idea ver.2[edit]

Mountain
Elevation
Region
Note
Image
Japanese
No.
Mt. Fuji 3,776 m (12,388 ft) Independent 100 Famous -50px 01 Fujisan from Yamanakako 2004-2-7.jpg 富士山 1
Mt. Kita 3,193 m (10,476 ft) Southern Alps 100 Famous Mount Kita from Mount Nakashirane 2001-10-03.JPG 北岳 2
Mt. Hotaka 3,190 m (10,466 ft) Northern Alps 100 Famous 03 Okuhotakadake from Kitahotakadake 2000-9-3.jpg 穂高岳 3
Mt. Aino 3,189 m (10,463 ft) Southern Alps 100 Famous 04 Ainodake from Happonbanokashira 2001-10-3.jpg 間ノ岳 4
Mt. Yari 3,180 m (10,433 ft) Northern Alps 100 Famous 05 Yarigatake from Higashikamaone 2000-8-16.jpg 槍ヶ岳 5

Idea ver.1[edit]

Hokkaidō[edit]

No.
Image
Mountain
Metres
Feet
Prefecture
Range
Note,National Park
1 Rishiri Island.jpg Mount Rishiri
利尻山
1,721 5,646 Hokkaidō   Rishiri Island Rishiri-Fuji
Rishiri-Rebun-Sarobetsu National Park
2 Rausu-dake 02.JPG Mount Rausu
羅臼岳
1,660 5,446 Hokkaidō   Shiretoko Peninsula Shiretoko National Park
3 Mt. Shari.jpg Mount Shari
斜里岳
1,545 5,069 Hokkaidō   Shiretoko Peninsula
4 Mt meakann akannfuji&lake onnneto.jpg Akan Volcanic Complex
阿寒岳
1,499 4,918 Hokkaidō   Lake Akan
Akan National Park
5 Daisetsu0001.jpg Mount Daisetsu
大雪山
2,290 7,513 Hokkaidō   Daisetsuzan Volcanic Group Mount Asahi is the highest Mountain in Hokkaidō
Volcano, Daisetsuzan National Park

Tōhoku region[edit]

No.
Image
Mountain
Metres
Feet
Prefecture
Range
Note,National Park
10 Iwakisan 01.jpg Mount Iwaki
岩木山
1,625 5,331 Aomori Prefecture   Independent Mountain Tsugaru-Fuji
11 3 Peaks Hakkōda.jpg Hakkōda
八甲田山
1,584 5,197 Aomori Prefecture
Iwate Prefecture  
Towada-Hachimantai National Park
12 Hachimann numa 2008.jpg Mount Hachimantai
八幡平
1,613 5,292 Aomori Prefecture   Ōu Mountains Towada-Hachimantai National Park

Idea ver.0[edit]

Mountains over 3000 meters[edit]

There are 21 mountains over 3000 meters in Japan[1]. Almost of them are in Japanese Alps.

No.
Image
Mountain
Metres
Feet
Prefecture
Range
Note
1 01 Fujisan from Yamanakako 2004-2-7.jpg Mount Fuji 3,776 12,388 Shizuoka
Yamanashi  
Independent
Mountain
the highest Mountain in Japan
Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park
2 Mount Kita from Mount Nakashirane 2001-10-03.JPG Mount Kita 3,193 10,476 Yamanashi   Akaishi Mountains the highest Mountain in Akaishi Mountais
Minami Alps National Park
3 Hotakadake from Cyogatake 1999-8-1.jpg Mount Okuhotaka 3,190 10,466 Gifu
Nagano  
Hida Mountains the highest Mountain in Hida Mountais
Chūbu-Sangaku National Park
4 04 Ainodake from Happonbanokashira 2001-10-3.jpg Mount Aino 3,189 10,463 Shizuoka
Yamanashi  
Akaishi Moutains
5 05 Yarigatake from Higashikamaone 2000-8-16.jpg Mount Yari 3,180 10,433 Gifu
Nagano  
Hida Mountains


Mountains over 2500 meters[edit]

No.
Image
Mountain
Metres
Feet
Prefecture
Range
Note
1 Tsurugidake from bessan 22 1995 8 20.jpg Mount Tsurugi 2,999 9,839 Toyama   Hida Mountains (Tsurugi-dake)
2 Mount Suisho from Mount jii 2004-8-13.JPG Mount Suisho 2,986 9,797 Toyama   Hida Mountains (Suisho-dake or Kuro-dake) , 水晶岳
3 Kaikomagatake from kurisawayama 1998 10 11.jpg Mount Kaikoma 2,967 9,734 Nagano
Yamanashi  
Akaishi Moutains the highest Mountain in Komagatake
4 Mount Kisokoma from Kisomaedake 2008-9-9.jpg Mount Kisokoma 2,956 9,698 Nagano   Kiso Mountains
5 Shiroumadake from maruyama 26 2000 7 30.jpg Mount Shirouma 2,932 9,619 Nagano
Toyama  
Hida Mountains
  1. ^ the Altitude of the main mountain in Japan(Geospatial Information Authority of Japan)
  2. ^ Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park(Ministry of the Environment (Japan))
  3. ^ Chūbu-Sangaku National Park(Ministry of the Environment (Japan))
  4. ^ Minami Alps National Park(Ministry of the Environment (Japan))