United States House of Representatives elections in Louisiana, 2010

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Elections were held on November 2, 2010 to determine Louisiana's seven members of the United States House of Representatives. Representatives were elected for two-year terms to serve in the 112th United States Congress from January 3, 2011 until January 3, 2013. Primary elections were held on August 28, 2010,[1] and a runoff election for the Republican Party nomination in the 3rd district took place on October 2, 2010.[2]

Of the seven elections, the 2nd district was rated as competitive by CQ Politics[3] and the 2nd and 3rd districts were rated as competitive by The Cook Political Report,[4] The Rothenberg Political Report[5] and Sabato's Crystal Ball.[6][7] Five of Louisiana's seven incumbents (Republicans Steve Scalise of the 1st district, John Fleming of the 4th district, Rodney Alexander of the 5th district, Bill Cassidy of the 6th district and Charles Boustany of the 7th district) were re-elected.[8] Of the two who were not re-elected, one (Democrat Joseph Cao of the 2nd district) unsuccessfully sought re-election,[9] and one (Democrat Charlie Melancon of the 3rd district) ran for the U.S. Senate instead of seeking re-election.[10]

In Louisiana, candidates affiliated with parties that are not recognized by the state are listed on the ballot as "Other", while independent candidates are listed as "No Party".[11] In total, six Republicans and one Democrat were elected.[8] A total of 1,035,947 votes were cast, of which 675,386 (65 percent) were for Republican candidates, 311,221 (30 percent) were for Democratic candidates, 42,241 (4 percent) were for independent candidates and 7,099 (1 percent) were for unrecognized parties' candidates.[12]

District 1[edit]

Steve Scalise, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 1st district

In 2010 the 1st district included Metairie, Slidell, and parts of Kenner and New Orleans.[13] The district's population was 75 percent white, 16 percent black and 6 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 86 percent were high school graduates and 28 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $50,725.[14] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 72 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 26 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[13]

Republican Steve Scalise, who took office in May 2008, was the incumbent. Scalise was re-elected in November 2008 with 66 percent of the vote.[13] In 2010 his opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Myron Katz, who ran with the intention of raising awareness about energy conservation in homebuilding. Former lawyer Arden Wells, who does not belong to a party recognized by the state of Louisiana, also ran.[15]

Scalise raised $1,358,024 and spent $1,007,474. Katz raised $64,420 and spent $60,708.[16] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Scalise a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 72 percent of the vote to Katz's 25 percent.[17] On election day Scalise was re-elected with 79 percent of the vote to Katz's 19 percent.[18] Scalise was again re-elected in 2012.[19]

General election results[edit]

Louisiana's 1st district general election, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Scalise (incumbent) 157,182 78.52%
Democratic Myron Katz 38,416 19.19%
Other Arden Wells 4,578 2.29%
Totals 200,176 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 2[edit]

Joseph Cao, who unsuccessfully sought re-election in the 2nd district
Cedric Richmond, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 2nd district

The 2nd district included parts of New Orleans and Marrero.[20] The district's population was 57 percent black, 32 percent white and 6 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 78 percent were high school graduates and 20 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $40,061.[21] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 75 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 23 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[20] In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of D+25.[4]

Republican Joseph Cao, who took office in 2009, was the incumbent. Cao was elected in 2008 with 50 percent of the vote.[20] In 2010 Cao's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Cedric Richmond, a member of the Louisiana House of Representatives.[22] Anthony Marquize, a minister and businessman; and Jack Radosta, a carpenter and actor, ran as independent candidates.[23] Ron Austin, a lawyer, also ran as an independent candidate[24] but ended his campaign in September 2010.[25]

Eugene Green, the former chief of staff to U.S. Representative William J. Jefferson; Gary Johnson, a former research director for the United States House Committee on Rules; and Juan LaFonta, a member of the Louisiana House of Representatives, also sought the Democratic nomination.[26] In a poll of 341 likely Democratic primary voters, conducted in June 2010 by Zata 3 Consulting for Richmond's campaign, 53 percent supported Richmond while 13 percent favored LaFonta and 34 percent were undecided.[27] Karen Carter Peterson, a member of the Louisiana State Senate, said in July 2010 that she would not seek the Democratic nomination.[28]

Cao raised $2,079,915 and spent $2,097,806. Richmond raised $1,139,879 and spent $1,134,506. Marquize raised $14,021 and spent the same amount. Austin raised $7,300 and spent the same amount.[29] Green raised $85,248 and spent $85,395.[30] Johnson raised $15,561 and spent $15,538.[31] LaFonta raised $359,927 and spent $353,268.[32]

In a poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by Market Research Insights in May and June 2010, 51 percent of respondents supported Cao while 26 percent favored Richmond.[33] A poll published by Anzalone-Liszt in September 2010 found Richmond leading Cao by 45 percent to 35 percent.[34] In a poll of 605 likely voters, conducted by Public Policy Polling for Daily Kos on October 2 and 3, 2010, Richmond led with 49 percent to Cao's 38 percent while 13 percent remained undecided.[35] A poll of 500 likely voters, conducted by Zata|3 Consulting on October 20, 2010, found Richmond leading with 53 percent to Cao's 36 percent, while 2 percent supported Marquize, 1 percent chose Radosta and 8 percent were undecided.[36] In a poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by Anzalone-Liszt on October 20 and 21, 2010, Richmond led with 49 percent to Cao's 32 percent.[37]

Sabato's Crystal Ball rated the race as "Leans Democratic".[6] In October 2010 The Cook Political Report rated the race as "Lean Democratic"[4] while CQ Politics rated the race as "Likely Democratic".[3] In November 2010 The Rothenberg Political Report rated the race as "Democrat Favored".[5] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Richmond a 92 percent chance of winning, and projected that he would receive 55 percent of the vote to Cao's 42 percent.[38] On election day Richmond was elected with 65 percent of the vote to Cao's 33 percent.[18] Richmond was re-elected to a second term in 2012,[39] while Cao ran for Attorney General of Louisiana in 2011, but ended his campaign in September of that year.[40]

Democratic primary results[edit]

Louisiana's 2nd district Democratic primary, August 28, 2010[41]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Cedric Richmond 14,678 60.50%
Democratic Juan LaFonta 5,171 21.31%
Democratic Eugene Green 2,500 10.30%
Democratic Gary Johnson 1,914 7.89%
Totals 24,263 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Louisiana's 2nd district general election, November 2, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Cedric Richmond 83,705 64.59%
Republican Joseph Cao (incumbent) 43,378 33.47%
Independent Anthony Marquize 1,876 1.45%
Independent Jack Radosta 645 0.50%
Totals 129,604 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 3[edit]

Jeff Landry, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 3rd district

The 3rd district included Houma, Laplace and New Iberia.[42] The district's population was 66 percent white and 27 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 74 percent were high school graduates and 13 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $44,887.[43] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 61 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 37 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[42] The district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+12.[4]

Democrat Charlie Melancon, who took office in 2005, was the incumbent. Melancon was re-elected unopposed in 2008.[42] In 2010 Melancon ran for the U.S. Senate rather than seeking re-election.[10] The candidates in the general election were Democratic nominee Ravi Sangisetty and Republican nominee Jeff Landry, both lawyers.[44] Sangisetty was unopposed in the Democratic primary.[45] Hunt Downer, a former speaker of the Louisiana House of Representatives; and Kristian Magar, an oil field manager, also sought the Republican nomination.[46]

Sangisetty raised $828,014 and spent $836,316. Landry raised $1,362,786 and spent $1,360,649.[47] Downer raised $698,604 and spent $700,614.[48] Magar raised $37,751 and spent the same amount.[49]

Sabato's Crystal Ball rated the race as "Likely Republican".[7] In October 2010 The Cook Political Report rated the race as "Likely Republican".[4] In November 2010 The Rothenberg Political Report rated the race as "Republican Favored".[5] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Landry a 94 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 55 percent of the vote to Sangisetti's 43 percent.[50] On election day Landry was elected with 64 percent of the vote to Sangisetty's 36 percent.[18] Landry unsuccessfully ran for re-election in 2012.[51]

Republican primary results[edit]

Louisiana's 3rd district Republican primary, August 28, 2010[41]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeff Landry 10,396 49.62%
Republican Hunt Downer 7,570 36.13%
Republican Kristian Magar 2,987 14.26%
Totals 20,953 100.00%

Republican primary runoff results[edit]

Louisiana's 3rd district Republican primary runoff, October 2, 2010[52]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeff Landry 19,657 65.08%
Republican Hunt Downer 10,549 34.92%
Totals 30,206 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Louisiana's 3rd district general election, November 2, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeff Landry 108,963 63.77%
Democratic Ravi Sangisetty 61,914 36.23%
Totals 170,877 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 4[edit]

John Fleming, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 4th district

The 4th district included Bossier City, Natchitoches and Shreveport.[53] The district's population was 60 percent white and 34 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 82 percent were high school graduates and 18 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $38,436.[54] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 59 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 40 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[53]

Republican John Fleming, who took office in 2009, was the incumbent. Fleming was elected in 2008 with 48 percent of the vote.[53] In 2010 his opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee David Melville, a minister. Independent candidate Artis Cash also ran.[55] Fleming was unopposed in the Republican primary. Steven Gavi, a retail manager, also sought the Democratic nomination.[56]

Fleming raised $1,448,369 and spent $1,271,950. Melville raised $229,079 and spent $228,313. Cash raised $350 and spent no money.[57]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Fleming a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 63 percent of the vote to Melville's 35 percent.[58] On election day Fleming was re-elected with 62 percent of the vote to Melville's 32 percent.[18] Fleming was again re-elected in 2012.[59]

Democratic primary results[edit]

Louisiana's 4th district Republican primary, August 28, 2010[41]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Melville 10,145 81.10%
Democratic Steven Jude Gavi 2,365 18.90%
Totals 12,510 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Louisiana's 4th district general election, November 2, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Fleming (incumbent) 105,223 62.34%
Democratic David Melville 54,609 32.35%
Independent Artis Cash 8,962 5.31%
Totals 168,794 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 5[edit]

Rodney Alexander, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 5th district

The 5th district included Alexandria, Monroe and Ruston.[60] The district's population was 62 percent white and 34 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 77 percent were high school graduates and 17 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $35,510.[61] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 62 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 37 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[60]

Republican Rodney Alexander, who took office in 2003, was the incumbent. Alexander was re-elected unopposed in 2008.[60] In 2010 Alexander's opponent in the general election was independent candidate Tom Gibbs, a U.S. Army veteran.[62] Todd Slavant, the owner of a construction and property management company, also sought the Republican nomination.[63]

Alexander raised $1,260,755 and spent $1,239,963.[64] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Alexander a 100 percent chance of winning.[65] On election day Alexander was re-elected with 79 percent of the vote to Gibbs's 21 percent.[18] Alexander was again re-elected in 2012,[66] and resigned in 2013 to become secretary of the Louisiana Department of Veterans Affairs.[67] He was succeeded by Vance McAllister.[68]

Republican primary results[edit]

Louisiana's 5th district Republican primary, August 28, 2010[41]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rodney Alexander (incumbent) 14,031 88.94%
Republican Todd Slavant 1,744 11.06%
Totals 15,775 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Louisiana's 5th district general election, November 2, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rodney Alexander (incumbent) 122,033 78.57%
Independent Tom Gibbs, Jr. 33,279 21.43%
Totals 155,312 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 6[edit]

Bill Cassidy, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 6th district

The 6th district included Baton Rouge and Prairieville.[69] The district's population was 60 percent white and 34 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 85 percent were high school graduates and 26 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $47,840.[70] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 57 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 41 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[69]

Republican Bill Cassidy, who took office in 2009, was the incumbent. Cassidy was elected in 2008 with 48 percent of the vote.[69] In 2010 his opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Merritt McDonald, Sr., a retired engineer.[71] Cassidy and McDonald were both unopposed in their parties' primaries.[70]

Cassidy raised $1,584,256 and spent $738,171.[72] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Cassidy a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 64 percent of the vote to McDonald's 33 percent.[73] On election day Cassidy was re-elected with 66 percent of the vote to McDonald's 34 percent.[18] Cassidy was again re-elected in 2012.[74] In April 2013 he announced he would run for the U.S. Senate in 2014.[75]

General election results[edit]

Louisiana's 6th district general election, November 2, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Cassidy (incumbent) 138,607 65.63%
Democratic Merritt E. McDonald, Sr. 72,577 34.37%
Totals 211,184 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 7[edit]

Charles Boustany, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 7th district

The 7th district included Lafayette, Lake Charles and Sulphur.[76] The district's population was 70 percent white and 26 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 78 percent were high school graduates and 19 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $41,200.[77] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 63 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 35 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[76]

Republican Charles Boustany, who took office in 2005, was the incumbent. Boustany was re-elected with 62 percent of the vote in 2008.[76] In 2010 Boustany was unopposed for re-election.[78] According to Louisiana law, candidates who are unopposed are declared elected and their names do not appear on the ballot.[12]

Boustany raised $1,677,845 and spent $1,258,638.[79] Boustany was again re-elected in the 3rd district in 2012.[51]

External links[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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