University of Michigan Press

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University of Michigan Press
University of Michigan Press
Status Active
Founded 1930[1]
Country of origin United States
Headquarters location Ann Arbor, Michigan
Publication types Books, digital media
Nonfiction topics Humanities and social sciences
Official website press.umich.edu

The University of Michigan Press is part of Michigan Publishing at the University of Michigan Library.[2][3] It publishes 170 new titles each year[4] in the humanities and social sciences.[5] Titles from the press have been awarded the Pulitzer Prize, Bancroft Prize, and the Nautilus Book Award.

In 2010, Bard Graduate Center partnered with the University of Michigan Press to produce Cultural Histories of the Material World.[6][7]

Digital media[edit]

In March 2009, the University of Michigan Press announced the transition to digital publication,[8][9][10] a shift directed by former director of the University of Michigan Press, Phil Pochoda.[11] In a move that has been discussed since the 1990s,[12] this announcement came, according to The Michigan Daily, "approximately one month after the Association of American Universities and the Association of Research Libraries issued a call to action urging universities to take a more active role in producing and sharing academic works through digital technologies."[9] The shift to digitization began with the "publication of digital monographs in lieu of low-run, high-cost print editions."[12] According to Pochoda, the move freed " the press, in large part, from the constraints imposed by the print-based business model."[8][9][13] The University of Michigan Press publishes e-books in pdf, Amazon Kindle, and MP3 formats[14] and has extended its e-book services to the Ann Arbor District Library.[15]

In 2011, the University of Michigan Press began to publish installments of new releases on Facebook.[16] This move was followed later in the year by announcements of new releases on Twitter.[17]

Open access[edit]

The University of Michigan Press is one of thirteen publishers to participate in the Knowledge Unlatched pilot, a global library consortium approach to funding open access books,[18] and has included three titles in the Knowledge Unlatched Pilot Collection.[19]

Controversies[edit]

In June 2008, the University of Michigan Press severed ties with the British independent publishing firm, Pluto Press for which it served as the American distributor.[20] The decision came after a series of events tied to the distribution of the 2007 book Overcoming Zionism by Joel Kovel, which argues "that the creation of Israel was a mistake and urges adoption of the "one state" solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in which Israelis and Palestinians would form a new country, without a Jewish character".[21] The University of Michigan Press stopped distributing the book in the Fall of 2007, after "serious questions" were raised about the book by "members of the university community."[21] In addition, the relationship between the University of Michigan Press and Pluto Press c uamender examination by the faculty committee that oversees the press.[21] Later in September, the University of Michigan Press announced that it would resume distribution of Overcoming Zionism after receiving complaints that it was conducting censorship.[22] The Executive Board of the University of Michigan Press asserted in a statement that though it, "has deep reservations about Overcoming Zionism, it would be a blow against free speech to remove the book from distribution on that basis. We conclude that we should not fail to honor our distribution agreement based on our reservations about the content of a single book."[22] In the same statement, the University of Michigan Press stated that it would review its relationship with Pluto Press.[22]

In October 2007, the University of Michigan Press announced in a statement that it would continue to distribute books for Pluto Press. It also announced that it would review the policies dictating its relationship with external presses.[23] In an interview with Joel Kovel, Amy Goodman of Democracy Now! discussed this issue and focused in particular on the influence of Howard Zinn. In response, Kovel stated that he had contacted Zinn and that "Zinn and other well-known people, like Richard Falk, you know, have said yes, we’re on board with this."[24]

In November 2007, three members (out of eight) of the University of Michigan Board of Regents released a statement that called for the University of Michigan Press to cease distributing books for external publishing companies.[25] In January 2008, the University of Michigan announced new guidelines for the distribution of books by external publishing companies. The new guidelines stated that The University of Michigan Press will only distribute books by presses "whose mission is aligned with the mission of the UM Press and whose academic standards and processes of peer review are reasonably similar to those of the UM Press."[26]

In June 2008, the University of Michigan Press ended its relationship with Pluto Press.[20][27][28] McCraken stated in an interview with Inside Higher Ed that the relationship ended because Pluto Press does not use the same peer review process as The University of Michigan.[20] She also stated in response to a question that postulated a link with criticism of Overcoming Zionism that "the initial decision of the executive board of the press was that it would not make a decision based on a particular book" and that "certainly the free and open exchange of ideas is the foundation of everything we do at the university."[20] Roger van Zwanenberg, chairman of Pluto Press responded to the decision by linking it to the criticism of Overcoming Zionism. He stated: "What this tells you is that there are dark forces in America who would like to control the flow of ideas, and they are powerfully organized and they are very dangerous." He suggested that The University of Michigan knew that there was a difference in the peer review process from the beginning of their relationship, calling the decision to focus on peer review "a facade". He also stated that Pluto Press would seek a new American distributor.[20] Pluto Press is currently distributed in the United States by Palgrave Macmillan."[29]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "General University Timeline", University of Michigan.
  2. ^ "University of Michigan Press". University of Michigan Press. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  3. ^ "Our Books: Mission Statement". University of Michigan Press. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  4. ^ "Univ. of Michigan: Office of the Provost". University of Michigan. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  5. ^ "MCLS: The University of Michigan Press". Midwest Collective for Library Services. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  6. ^ "Bard Graduate Center and University of Michigan Press". Bard Graduate Center. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  7. ^ Farha, Amina (2007-11-07). "What does the University Press Do?: Pressing issues". The Michigan Daily. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  8. ^ a b Jaschik, Scott (2009-03-23). "Farewell to the Printed Monograph". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  9. ^ a b c Swanson, Kyle (2009-03-23). "University to merge publishing operations with library". The Michigan Daily. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  10. ^ "UMP Digital Transition". University of Michigan Press. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  11. ^ "University of Michigan Press director Phil Pochoda retires". University of Michigan Library. 2011-05-11. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  12. ^ a b Albanese, Andrew (2009-03-26). "University of Michigan Press Merged with Library, With NewEmphasis onDigital Monographs". Library Journal. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  13. ^ "RESHAPING THE WRITING OF HISTORY IN THE DIGITAL AGE". Trinity College (Connecticut). 2011-10-25. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  14. ^ "University of Michigan Press: Ebooks". University of Michigan Press. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  15. ^ "University of Michigan Press EBooks Now Available Through AADL". Ann Arbor District Library. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  16. ^ Kirch, Claire (2011-07-18). "University Press Launches Facebook Serials". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 2012-08-12. 
  17. ^ Kirch, Claire (2011-10-24). "University of Michigan Press Uses Twitter to Promote New Releases". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 2012-08-12. 
  18. ^ "Good for publishers". knowledgeunlatched.org. 
  19. ^ "Three Press Titles Included in Knowledge Unlatched Pilot Collection". umich.edu. 
  20. ^ a b c d e Jaschik, Scott (2008-06-18). "Michigan Severs Ties to Controversial Publisher". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved 2012-08-08. 
  21. ^ a b c Jaschik, Scott (2007-09-11). "A Book on Hold". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved 2012-08-08. 
  22. ^ a b c Jaschik, Scott (2007-09-12). "Michigan Resumes Distribution of Anti-Israel Book". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved 2012-08-08. 
  23. ^ Jaschik, Scott (2007-10-25). "Michigan Keeps Link to Controversial Publisher". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved 2012-08-08. 
  24. ^ "University of Michigan Press to Continue Publishing Joel Kovel’s "Overcoming Zionism" After Initially Dropping Book Due to Rightwing Criticism". Democracy Now!. 2007-10-29. Retrieved 2012-08-08. 
  25. ^ Jaschik, Scott (2007-11-19). "Quick Takes: Publishing Controversy, Concerns on A". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved 2012-08-08. 
  26. ^ Jaschik, Scott (2008-01-21). "Quick Takes: Bowdoin Drops Loans, Scrutiny for Pluto Press, Another Indian Student Murdered, Diversity Training Questioned, Purchasing Card Fraud, Admissions Snafu, Rules on 529 Plans, Strike Ends in Israel, Tokyo Starts English-Only Grad Program". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved 2012-08-08. 
  27. ^ Kroll, Andy (2008-01-23). "Under fire, 'U' Press changes guidelines". The Michigan Daily. Retrieved 2012-08-08. 
  28. ^ "The University of Michigan Press: Distributed Clients". University of Michigan Press. Retrieved 2012-08-08. 
  29. ^ "Palgrave Macmillan: Distribution Partners". Palgrave Macmillan. Retrieved 2012-08-08.