Veja (magazine)

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Veja
Editorial Director Eurípedes Alcântara
Categories News, Politics, Economy, Entertainment, Sports & Culture
Publisher Editora Abril
Paid circulation 923.865 (2012)
Total circulation
(2012)
1.217.882 (2012)
First issue September 11, 1968
Country Brazil
Language Portuguese

Veja (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈveʒɐ], English: See) is a Brazilian weekly newsmagazine published in São Paulo and distributed throughout the country by the media conglomerate Grupo Abril. It is the leading weekly publication in the country, and one of the most influential outlets of the Brazilian press.

Veja publishes articles about politics, economics, culture, behavior, world events, entertainment and wars. It treats subjects as technology, ecology and religion with certain regularity. It has recurring sections on cinema, television, practical literature, music and guides on diverse subjects.[1]

It was founded in September 11, 1968, and was censored by the Brazilian military regime from 1969 to 1976.[2]

Columnists in the magazine include Diogo Mainardi, Caio Blinder, Reinaldo Azevedo, Stephen Kanitz, Lya Luft and Ivan Ângelo.

Some of the published content can be seen on the magazine's website for free. Only subscribers have full access.

Veja's main competitors are Época and IstoÉ.

Renan Calheiros[edit]

On its May 25, 2007 issue Veja ran a story on the president of the Brazilian Senate, Renan Calheiros, accusing him of accepting funds from a lobbyist to pay for the child support of a daughter from a previous extramarital affair with journalist Monica Veloso. During a speech in his defense given from the Senate's floor, Calheiros accused Grupo Abril, Veja's parent company, of having violated Brazilian corporate law in relation to its sale of 30% of the capital of its publishing arm to South-African media group Naspers.[3] Abril responded to Calheiros in a press release where they denied all charges.[4]

Ideological bias[edit]

Veja is often harshly criticized from all sides of the political spectrum outside right-wing conservativism for its stronger focus on those viewpoints.

For example, more than once, it gave voice to sociologists and/or psychologists voicing that sexual orientation is more of a choice than an inborn trait or in favor of allowing regulated Brazilian professionals treating homosexuality as an illness and offering sexual orientation conversion therapy (widely regarded all over the world as ineffective and often more harming than helping), saying Brazil lacks homophobia, and comparing advances of the LGBT rights in Brazil, such as same-sex marriage, to zoophilia. Using homossexualidade instead of widely regarded as pathologizing homossexualismo is not one of the standards for professional media political correctness of the magazine.[5] The magazine was also criticized by publications in which they denied that top models suffered from eating disorders and by discrimination against muslins.

References[edit]

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