Washington State Cougars football

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Washington State Cougars football
2014 Washington State Cougars football team
WashingtonStateCougars.png
First season 1893
Head coach Mike Leach
3rd year, 12–25 (.324)
Home stadium Martin Stadium
Year built 1972
Stadium capacity 33,522
Stadium surface FieldTurf - (2000-present)
Location Pullman, Washington
Conference Pacific-12
Division North
All-time record 500–526–45 (.488)
Postseason bowl record 6–5 (.545)
Claimed national titles 1 (1915)
Conference titles 4 (1917, 1930, 1997, 2002)
Heisman winners 0
Consensus All-Americans 5
Current uniform
Pac-12-Uniform-WSU.png
Colors

Crimson and Gray

          
Fight song Washington State University Fight Song
Mascot Butch T. Cougar
Marching band Cougar Marching Band
Rivals Washington Huskies
Idaho Vandals
Oregon Ducks
Oregon State Beavers
Website WSUcougars.com

The Washington State Cougars football team is the intercollegiate football team of Washington State University. The team is part of the Pacific-12 Conference. They are currently coached by Mike Leach.

The Cougars play home games on campus at Martin Stadium, which opened in 1972; the site dates back to 1892 when it was called Soldier Field. Its present seating capacity is 33,522.[1]

History[edit]

Early History (1894-1925)[edit]

Washington State University 1900 football team. At that time it was known as Washington Agricultural College.

Washington State's first head football coach was William Goodyear.[2] That team played only two games in its inaugural season in 1894, posting a 1–1 record.[2] The team's first win was over Idaho.[2]

The first paid head football coach was William L. Allen, who served as head coach in 1900 and 1902,[2] posting an overall record of 6–3–1.[2]

John R. Bender served as head football coach from 1906-1907 and 1912-1914, compiling a record of 21–12.[3]

William Henry Dietz was the Cougars' head football coach from 1915-1917, posting a stellar 17–2–1 record.[4] Dietz's 1915 team defeated Brown in the Rose Bowl, and finished with a 7-0 record and a national title recognized by Washington state's legislature. In that season, the Cougars allowed only 10 points total on defense.[4][5] Dietz was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 2012.[6]

Albert Exendine served as Washington State's head football coach from 1923-1925, posting a 6–13–4 overall record.[7]

Babe Hollingbery era (1926-1942)[edit]

Babe Hollingbery was the Cougars' head football coach for 17 seasons, posting a 93–53–14 record.[8] His 93 wins are the most by any head football coach in Washington State football history.[9] Hollingbery's 1930 team played in the 1931 Rose Bowl, a game they lost to Alabama.[8] The Cougars didn't lose a single home game from 1926-1935.[9] Among the Cougar greats Holingbery coached were Mel Hein, Turk Edwards and Mel Dressel.[9] The Holingbery Fieldhouse that serves many of Washington State's athletics teams, was named in his honor in 1963.[9] He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1979.[9]

Phil Sarboe era (1945-1949)[edit]

The cougars did not field a football team from 1943 to 1944 because of World War II.[10] After the war ended, Phil Sarboe was hired away from Central Washington to return to his alma mater to take over as the head football coach.[10] Sarboe's Cougars posted a 17–26–3 record in Sarboe's five seasons.[11]

Forest Evashevski era (1950-1951)[edit]

Forest Evashevski took over the Cougars football program as the head coach in late 1949.[12] His 1951 team finished the season ranked #14 in the Coaches' Poll and #18 in the AP Poll.[13] He posted an 11–6–2 record in his two seasons[13] before leaving to take the Iowa head football coach position.[12] Evashevski was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 2000.[12]

Al Kircher era (1952-1955)[edit]

Al Kircher, an assistant on Evashevski's staff, was promoted to head coach following Evashevski's departure.[14] Kircher didn't enjoy as much success as his predecessor, going 13–25–2 in his four seasons as head coach.[15] He was not retained after his contract expired.[14]

Jim Sutherland era (1956-1963)[edit]

Jim Sutherland was Washington State's 21st head football coach. He held the Cougars head coach position for eight seasons.[16] His overall record with the Cougars was 37–39–4.[17]

Bert Clark era (1964-1967)[edit]

Bert Clark served as Washington State's head football coach for four seasons,[18] posting a record of 15–24–1.[19] His best season was 1965, when the Cougars went 7–3[20] and defeated three Big Ten teams on the road.[21] That season was Clark's only winning season, as he failed to win more than three games in his other seasons.[22] Clark was not retained after the end of his fourth season.[21]

Jim Sweeney era (1968-1975)[edit]

Jim Sweeney served as the Cougars head football coach for eight seasons.[23] His final record was 26–59–1.[24] Sweeney's best season was 1972, when the Cougars finished 7–4.[25] That was his only winning season.[26] Sweeney was let go after the 1975 season.[27]

Sherrill and Powers (1976-1977)[edit]

Jackie Sherrill was Washington State's head coach for one season.[28] His team posted a 3–8 record.[29] Sherrill departed after that one season to accept the head football coach position at Pittsburgh.[30]

Warren Powers served as head coach for one season[31] before accepting the head football coach position at Missouri.[32]

Jim Walden era (1978-1986)[edit]

Jim Walden was promoted to head coach following the departure of Powers.[33] Walden led the Cougars to one bowl appearance, the 1981 Holiday Bowl, a game they lost to BYU.[33][34] That bowl appearance was Washington State's first in 51 years.[33] Walden won Pac-12 Coach of the Year Honors in 1981 and 1983.[33][35] Walden's final record at Washington State was 44–52–4.[33][36] Players coached by Walden at Washington State include Jack Thompson, Kerry Porter, Rueben Mayes, Ricky Reynolds, Paul Sorensen, Brian Forde, Lee Blakeney, Mark Rypien, Dan Lynch, Pat Beach, Keith Millard, Erik Howard, and Cedrick Brown.[33] Walden left after the 1986 season to accept the head football coach position at Iowa State.[33][37]

Dennis Erickson era (1987-1988)[edit]

Coach Erickson

When he was named Washington State's head football coach on January 7, 1987, Dennis Erickson said it was his lifelong dream to become the head football coach of the Cougars.[38] His contract he signed in 1987 was a five-year deal at an annual base salary of $70,000, with up to $30,000 from radio, television, and speaking obligations.[39]

Erickson's Cougars posted a 3–7–1 record in his first season but improved to a 9–3 record in 1988,[40] capped with a victory in the Aloha Bowl, the Cougars' first bowl victory since 1916.[41] Although stating publicly a week earlier that he would not leave Washington State,[42] Erickson accepted the head football coach position at Miami in March 1989,[43] leaving the Cougars after two seasons and a 12–10–1 overall record.[44]

Mike Price era (1989-2002)[edit]

Mike Price came to Washington State from Weber State.[45] Price led the Cougars to unprecedented success, taking his 1997 and 2002 teams to the Rose Bowl, both times losing.[45] Those teams finished ranked #9 and #10 in the Coaches' and AP Polls, respectively.[45][46] Price also led the Cougars to victories in the Copper Bowl, the Alamo Bowl and the Sun Bowl.[45][47] Price's record at Washington State is 83–78.[45][48] It was during the 2002 season that Washington State received its highest ranking ever in the modern era within the AP Polls at #3.[45] Price resigned following the 2002 season to accept the head football coach position at Alabama,[45] but was fired before ever coaching a game for the Crimson Tide due to an off-the-field incident.[49]

Bill Doba era (2003-2007)[edit]

Bill Doba was promoted from defensive coordinator to head coach following Price's departure.[50] Things started out well for Doba's Cougars, as they went 10–3 in Doba's first year to finish ranked #9 in both the AP and Coaches' Polls.[51] But, things went downhill. The Cougars slipped to 5–6 in 2004, and posted a 4–7 record in 2005.[52] A 6–6 2006 season followed,[53] and after finishing the 2007 season 5–7,[54] Doba was fired.[55]

Paul Wulff era (2008-2011)[edit]

Paul Wulff was hired away from Eastern Washington to replace the fired Bill Doba.[56] Wulff struggled mightily as the Cougars head football coach, failing to win more than four games in a single season.[57] His final record at Washington State is 9–40,[58] the lowest winning percentage (.184) of any head coach in Washington State football history.[59] Wulff was fired after the 2011 season.[60]

Mike Leach era (2012-present)[edit]

Coach Leach

Former Texas Tech head coach Mike Leach was hired as the new Washington State head coach in late 2011.[61] Leach immediately began to install his "Air Raid" attack, an exciting, high-scoring, pass-oriented offense.

Leach's first season was another struggle, as the Cougars posted a 3–9 record.[62] WSU had gone winless in conference play until defeating arch-rival Washington the last game of the regular season.[63] Leach received a two-year contract extension on November 18, 2013.[64]

The Cougars improved in Leach's second season, posting a 6–7 record but capping the season with a disappointing loss to Colorado State in the New Mexico Bowl.[65][66]

Head coaching history[edit]

Tenure Coach Years Record Pct.
1894 William Goodyear 1 1–1 .500
1895 W.W. Waite 1 2–0 1.000
1896 David Brodie 1 2–0–1 1.000
1897 Robert Galley 1 2–0 1.000
1898–99 Frank Shively 2 1–1–1 .500
1900, 1902 William Allen 2 6–3–1 .650
1901 William Namack 1 4–1 .800
1903 James Ashmore 1 3–3–2 .500
1904–05 Everett Sweeley 2 6–6 .500
1906–07, 1912–14 John R. Bender 5 21–12 .636
1908 Walter Rheinschild 1 4–0–2 .833
1909 Willis Keinholz 1 4–1 .800
1910–11 Oscar Osthoff 2 5–6 .454
1915–17 William Henry Dietz 3 17–2–1 .875
1918 Emory Alvord 1 1–1 .500
1919–22 Gus Welch 4 16–10–1 .611
1923–25 Albert Exendine 3 6–13–4 .348
1926–42 O.E. Hollingbery 15 93–53–14 .625
1943–44 World War II - no teams
1945–49 Phil Sarboe 5 17–26–3 .402
1950–51 Forest Evashevski 2 11–6–2 .632
1952–55 Al Kircher 4 13–25–2 .350
1958–63 Jim Sutherland 8 37–39–4 .488
1964–67 Bert Clark 4 15–24–1 .388
1968–75 Jim Sweeney 8 26–59–1 .308
1976 Jackie Sherrill 1 3–8 .273
1977 Warren Powers 1 6–5 .545
1978–86 Jim Walden 9 44–52–4 .460
1987–88 Dennis Erickson 2 12–10–1 .543
1989–2002 Mike Price 14 83–78 .516
2003–07 Bill Doba 5 30–29 .508
2008–11 Paul Wulff 4 9–40 .184
2012–present Mike Leach 3 12–25 .324
Totals 33 coaches 117 seasons 500–526–45 .488 [67]
Martin Stadium, home of Cougars football, in October 2008
Martin Stadium, home of Cougars football, in August 2012 with the new press box and premium seating addition nearing completion

Current coaching staff[edit]

  • Mike Leach - Head Coach/Offensive Coordinator
  • Jim Mastro - Running Backs
  • David Yost - Inside Receivers
  • Dennis Simmons - Outside Receivers
  • Clay McGuire - Offensive Line
  • Joe Salave'a - Assistant Head Coach/Defensive Line
  • Ken Wilson - Linebackers
  • Dave Emerick - Chief of Staff
  • Antonio Huffman - Director of Football Operations

[68]

Bowl games[edit]

Washington State has made 11 bowl appearances, and has a bowl record of 6–5. The Cougars have played in the Rose Bowl four times (1 win, 3 losses), the Holiday Bowl twice (1 win, 1 loss), one Aloha Bowl (1 win), one Copper Bowl (1 win), one Alamo Bowl (1 win), one Sun Bowl (1 win), and one New Mexico Bowl (1 loss).[69]

List of bowl games showing bowl played in, score, date, season, opponent, stadium, location, attendance and head coach[A 1]
# Bowl Score[A 2] Date Season[A 3] Opponent[A 4] Stadium Location Attendance[70] Head coach
1 Rose Bowl W 14–0 January 1, 1916 1915 Brown Bruins Tournament Park Pasadena 7,000 Dietz, William HenryWilliam Henry Dietz
2 Rose Bowl L 24–0 January 1, 1931 1930 Alabama Crimson Tide Rose Bowl Pasadena 60,000 Hollingbery, BabeBabe Hollingbery
3 Holiday Bowl L 38–36 December 30, 1981 1980 BYU Cougars Jack Murphy Stadium[A 5] San Diego 52,419 Walden, JimJim Walden
4 Aloha Bowl W 24–22 December 25, 1988 1988 Houston Cougars Aloha Stadium Honolulu 35,132 Erickson, DennisDennis Erickson
5 Copper Bowl W 31–28 December 29, 1992 1992 Utah Utes Arizona Stadium Tucson 40,876double-dagger Price, MikeMike Price
6 Alamo Bowl W 10–3 December 31, 1994 1994 Baylor Bears Alamodome San Antonio 44,106 Price, MikeMike Price
7 Rose Bowl L 21–16 January 1, 1998 1997 Michigan Wolverines Rose Bowl Pasadena 100,635 Price, MikeMike Price
8 Sun Bowl W 33–27 December 31, 2001 2001 Purdue Boilermakers Sun Bowl El Paso 47,812 Price, MikeMike Price
9 Rose Bowl L 34–14 January 1, 2003 2002 Oklahoma Sooners Rose Bowl Pasadena 86,848 Price, MikeMike Price
10 Holiday Bowl W 28–20 December 30, 2003 2003 Texas Longhorns Qualcomm Stadium[A 5] San Diego 61,102 Doba, BillBill Doba
11 New Mexico Bowl L 48–45 December 21, 2013 2013 Colorado State Rams University Stadium Albuquerque 27,104 Leach, MikeMike Leach

Notable players[edit]

Rivalry games[edit]

Notable Games[edit]

  • In 1988, Washington State upset the #1 UCLA, 34-30
  • In 1991, Jason Hanson kicked a school record 62-yard field goal against UNLV.[72]
  • In 1992, Whether Drew Bledsoe wanted Davis or Bobo in snowy weather, it didn't matter as Washington State upset the #5 ranked Huskies in the Apple Cup Victory, 42-23 (known as the 'Snow Bowl')
  • In 2001, WSU beat No. 9 UCLA, 20-14
  • In 2002, WSU beat No. 18 USC, 30-27 on Drew Dunning's FG in OT. USC finished fourth in the nation that season and won the Orange Bowl
  • In 2003 WSU capped a run of three consecutive 10-win seasons by knocking off No. 5 Texas in the Holiday Bowl, 28-20. Punter Kyle Basler was named defensive MVP and receiver Sammy Moore was named offensive MVP.
  • In 2012, Andrew Furney kicked a game winning field goal to upset the 25th ranked University of Washington Huskies and win the Apple Cup, 31-28 (OT).
  • In 2013, Damante Horton lead Washington State on the road to Southern California with 2 interceptions, and a 70 yard INT for a pick six. It was the Cougs 1st win against SC since 2002, and 1st road win against SC since 2000. Andrew Furney knocked in 40+ yard Field Goal in order to steal the lead late. Washington State upset the 25th ranked Trojans, 10-7.
  • In 2013, Washington State reached its first bowl game in a decade, where they were defeated by Colorado State 48-45 in the New Mexico Bowl.

Past uniforms[edit]

Future non-conference opponents[edit]

2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
vs Portland State vs Eastern Washington vs Nevada at Wyoming vs BYU at Wisconsin vs Wisconsin
at Rutgers at Boise State vs Boise State vs San Jose State
vs Wyoming vs Idaho vs Montana State vs Eastern Washington

-

[73]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Statistics correct as of 2011–12 NCAA football bowl games.
  2. ^ Results are sortable first by whether the result was an Washington State win, loss or tie and then second by the margin of victory.
  3. ^ Links to the season article for the Washington State team that competed in the bowl for that year.
  4. ^ Links to the season article for the opponent that Washington State competed against in the bowl for that year when available or to their general page when unavailable.
  5. ^ a b Originally called Jack Murphy Stadium from 1980 to 1997, in 1998 it was renamed Qualcomm Stadium.[71]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stalwick, Howie (August 14, 2012). "Stadium a Little Bigger, Way Better for Cougars". The News Tribune (Tacoma). Retrieved January 9, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d e http://www.nationalchamps.net/NCAA/database/washingtonstate_database.htm
  3. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/john-bender-1.html
  4. ^ a b http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/william-dietz-1.html
  5. ^ http://www.tiptop25.com/champ1915.html
  6. ^ http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/08/13/william-lone-star-dietz-posthumously-inducted-football-hall-fame-128617
  7. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/albert-exendine-1.html
  8. ^ a b http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/oe-hollingbery-1.html
  9. ^ a b c d e http://www.footballfoundation.org/Programs/CollegeFootballHallofFame/SearchDetail.aspx?id=30078
  10. ^ a b http://www.lostlettermen.com/phil_sarboe-washington_state-football-pac-10-p231608/
  11. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/phil-sarboe-1.html
  12. ^ a b c http://sports.espn.go.com/ncf/news/story?id=4611947
  13. ^ a b http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/forest-evashevski-1.html
  14. ^ a b http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/wire?section=ncf&id=1941882
  15. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/alton-kircher-1.html
  16. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/jim-sutherland-1.html
  17. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/jim-sutherland-1.html
  18. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/bert-clark-1.html
  19. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/bert-clark-1.html
  20. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/bert-clark-1.html
  21. ^ a b http://www.seattlepi.com/sports/article/Robert-Bert-Clark-Jr-1930-2004-WSU-coach-s-1162277.php
  22. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/bert-clark-1.html
  23. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/jim-sweeney-1.html
  24. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/jim-sweeney-1.html
  25. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/jim-sweeney-1.html
  26. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/jim-sweeney-1.html
  27. ^ http://www.fresnobee.com/2013/02/08/3166744/jim-sweeney-legendary-fresno-state.html
  28. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/jackie-sherrill-1.html
  29. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/jackie-sherrill-1.html
  30. ^ http://www.post-gazette.com/sports/bob-smizik/2007/01/21/Smizik-Pitt-football-s-biggest-loss-is-Jackie-Sherrill/stories/200701210181
  31. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/warren-powers-1.html
  32. ^ http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1907&dat=19841120&id=HnhhAAAAIBAJ&sjid=89gEAAAAIBAJ&pg=1454,4487010
  33. ^ a b c d e f g http://www.wsucougars.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=30400&ATCLID=207875597
  34. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/jim-walden-1.html
  35. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/jim-walden-1.html
  36. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/jim-walden-1.html
  37. ^ http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1345&dat=19861211&id=fFhYAAAAIBAJ&sjid=1fkDAAAAIBAJ&pg=5576,2360186
  38. ^ http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=goxfAAAAIBAJ&sjid=JS8MAAAAIBAJ&pg=3305%2C1796486
  39. ^ http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=16gpAAAAIBAJ&sjid=3O8DAAAAIBAJ&pg=6779,7256935
  40. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/dennis-erickson-1.html
  41. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/dennis-erickson-1.html
  42. ^ http://articles.latimes.com/1989-02-27/sports/sp-534_1_florida-job
  43. ^ http://umsportshalloffame.com/bio.asp?ID=33
  44. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/dennis-erickson-1.html
  45. ^ a b c d e f g http://www.cougcenter.com/wsu-cougars-football/2012/11/19/3667672/mike-price-retirement-utep-wsu-cougars-rose-bowls
  46. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/mike-price-1.html
  47. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/mike-price-1.html
  48. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/mike-price-1.html
  49. ^ http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/sports/college/football/sec/2003-05-03-price-fired_x.htm
  50. ^ http://newsok.com/washington-state-hires-doba/article/2819340
  51. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/bill-doba-1.html
  52. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/bill-doba-1.html
  53. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/bill-doba-1.html
  54. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/bill-doba-1.html
  55. ^ http://seattletimes.com/html/sports/2004036104_webdobafired26.html
  56. ^ http://news.wsu.edu/2007/12/12/ewus-paul-wulff-hired-as-new-coug-coach/#.UrY582yA3IU
  57. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/paul-wulff-1.html
  58. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/paul-wulff-1.html
  59. ^ "2010 Washington State Football Media Guide". Washington State University. p. 142. Retrieved 2011-09-09. 
  60. ^ http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/7294814/washington-state-cougars-fire-paul-wulff-football-coach
  61. ^ http://content.usatoday.com/communities/campusrivalry/post/2011/11/washington-state-agreement-coach-mike-leach-texas-tech/1#.Up9zvicsYs8
  62. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/mike-leach-1.html
  63. ^ http://espn.go.com/ncf/recap?gameId=323280265
  64. ^ http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/9996715/mike-leach-contract-extended-washington-state-cougars=18
  65. ^ http://scores.espn.go.com/ncf/recap?gameId=333550036&team=wah
  66. ^ http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/coaches/mike-leach-1.html
  67. ^ NCAA Record Book. 2012 Preseason. p. 65 http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/stats/football_records/2012/fbs.pdf |url= missing title (help). Retrieved 2013-01-09.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  68. ^ http://www.wsucougars.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=30400&ATCLID=208484260
  69. ^ Washington State University Bowl Game History
  70. ^ Bowl/All-Star Game Records, pp. 32–38
  71. ^ Bowl/All-Star Game Records, p. 8
  72. ^ Washington St. 24, E. Washington 20. cbssports.com.
  73. ^ "Washington State Cougars Football Schedules and Future Schedules". fbschedules.com. Retrieved 2014-09-24. 

Sources[edit]

  • ESPN College Football Encyclopedia (pages 998–995)

External links[edit]