West Eighth Street – New York Aquarium (New York City Subway)

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West Eighth Street – New York Aquarium
NYCS F NYCS Q
New York City Subway rapid transit station
West 8th Street station vc.jpg
Station statistics
Address West 8th Street near Surf Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11224
Borough Brooklyn
Locale Coney Island
Coordinates 40°34′34.24″N 73°58′32.88″W / 40.5761778°N 73.9758000°W / 40.5761778; -73.9758000Coordinates: 40°34′34.24″N 73°58′32.88″W / 40.5761778°N 73.9758000°W / 40.5761778; -73.9758000
Division B (BMT/IND)
Line BMT Brighton Line
IND Culver Line
Services       F all times (all times)
      Q all times (all times)
Connection
Structure Elevated
Levels 2
Platforms 4 side platforms (2 on each level)
Tracks 4 (2 on each level)
Other information
Opened May 19, 1919; 95 years ago (1919-05-19)
Former/other names Coney Island – West Eighth Street
Traffic
Passengers (2013) 702,810[1] Decrease 8%
Rank 390 out of 421
Station succession
Next north Ocean Parkway (Brighton): Q all times
Neptune Avenue (Culver): F all times
Next south Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue: F all times Q all times

West Eighth Street – New York Aquarium is a station on the BMT Brighton Line and the IND Culver Line of the New York City Subway. The station is located over the private right-of-way of the defunct New York and Coney Island Railroad, north of Surf Avenue and running easterly from West 8th Street on the Coney Island peninsula in Brooklyn. It is served by the F and Q trains at all times.

History and description[edit]

The station, originally identified as Coney Island – West Eighth Street, replaced the Culver Depot, the surface terminus of the Brighton Beach and Culver Lines. The current station consists of a two-level elevated line, with two tracks and two side platforms on each level. The BMT Brighton Line occupies the upper level and the IND Culver Line occupies the lower level.

Brighton service began serving the station on May 19, 1919, with Brighton Local trains using the lower level and Brighton Express trains (when operated) using the upper level. On May 1, 1920, Culver trains began sharing the lower level with the Brighton Line. Level usage varied over the years with different Brighton services using the lower level at different times. In 1954 the track connection between the Brighton Line at Ocean Parkway and the lower level of West 8th Street station was severed, and Brighton and Culver trains have had exclusive use of their respective levels since. The structure for the connector tracks still exists.

Station layout[edit]

3F Side platform, doors will open on the right
Southbound NYCS Q toward Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue (Terminus)
Northbound NYCS Q toward Astoria – Ditmars Boulevard weekdays, 57th Street – Seventh Avenue weekends (Ocean Parkway)
Side platform, doors will open on the right
2F Side platform, doors will open on the right
Southbound NYCS F toward Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue (Terminus)
Northbound NYCS F toward Jamaica – 179th Street (Neptune Avenue)
Side platform, doors will open on the right
G Street Level Exit/Entrance, fare control

The 2005 artwork here is called Wavewall by Vito Acconci.

The station is two blocks east of the neighboring Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue station, which is the southern terminus of both services.

Exits[edit]

  • Main Exit: West 8th Street (south end), with full-time station agent booth
  • Secondary Exit: West 6th Street (MetroCard entry only)

This station contains three entrances. The first one contains three High Entry-Exit turnstiles and leads directly to the Manhattan-bound platform of the lower level. The main entrance is directly underneath and leads to West Fifth Street on one side and Surf Avenue on the other. There was a pedestrian bridge that spanned Surf Avenue and connected the two aforementioned entrances; the walkway was torn down on 8 August 2013, due to safety issues. A crosswalk and widened sidewalks replaced the bridge, which was built when the New York Aquarium was first opened at that location.[2] The third entrance leads to West Sixth Street, which at this point, is a dirt road only for pedestrians that runs directly underneath the Culver Line. This entrance contains HEET and exit-only turnstiles and an escalator that leads directly to the Manhattan-bound platform of the upper level.

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership". New York City Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved 2014-03-26. 
  2. ^ Coney leaders applaud, boo loss of path from train to Boardwalk

External links[edit]