List of New York City Subway transfer stations

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The Times Square – 42nd Street / 42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal station complex is the busiest station of the New York City Subway and offers connections between eleven services, the most of all the system's transfer stations

In the New York City Subway there are several types of transfer stations:

  1. Station complex, i.e. two or more stations connected with a passageway inside fare control. The 468 stations of the New York City Subway are enumerated each station alone. When station complexes are considered to be one station each, the count of stations is 421.[1]
  2. Station serving two or more lines. It may be a multi-level or adjacent-platform station and is considered to be one station as classified by the MTA. Typically each track in a station belongs to a certain line.
  3. Station serving two or more services. Different services may share tracks. These stations are not included in this article; see List of New York City Subway stations.[2]






L







L


L




E


E




L
South Ferry – Whitehall Street is a complex
formed by two stations connected
with a passageway inside fare control
Hoyt–Schermerhorn
Streets
is a station
serving two lines
A typical express
station serving two
or three services
Staircase connecting two stations at Roosevelt Avenue / 74th Street

Transfers are not limited to enclosed passageways. The New York City Transit Authority (NYCTA), manager of the New York City Subway, also offers limited free transfers between subway lines that allow passengers to reenter the system's fare control. This was originally done through a paper ticketing system before it was replaced by the MetroCard. Now the only existing MetroCard subway-to-subway transfer is between the Lexington Avenue / 59th Street complex (4 5 6 <6> N Q R trains) and the Lexington Avenue – 63rd Street station (F train).

Some paper transfers between specific subway stations and bus routes also existed prior to July 4, 1997, when the MetroCard allowed free system-wide subway–bus transfers with fewer restrictions.[citation needed] The Rockaway Parkway station on the BMT Canarsie Line (L train) offers a transfer to the B42 bus within the station's fare control, the only such transfer within the NYCTA.

The former and current track configurations at the Queensboro Plaza cross-platform transfer station

The system was created from the consolidation of three separate companies that merged in 1940: the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT), the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT), and the Independent Subway System (IND). The earliest transfer stations were between lines of the same system: either the IRT, BMT or IND. The earliest free connection between lines that remains in existence is at Grand Central – 42nd Street between the IRT Flushing Line and the original IRT subway (now served by the IRT 42nd Street Shuttle), which opened on June 22, 1915.[3] Some stations were constructed with passageways that connected different systems, such as the original IRT subway's (now IRT Lexington Avenue Line) Brooklyn Bridge station with the BMT Centre Street Loop Subway's (now BMT Nassau Street Line) Chambers Street station.[4] On July 1, 1948, post-unification, many free transfers between the former systems were created coincident with the doubling of the fare from five to ten cents.[5]

The most recently created station complex is the Jay Street – MetroTech complex in Brooklyn on the IND Culver Line, IND Fulton Street Line and BMT Fourth Avenue Line; opened on December 8, 2010.[6] The Court Square complex in Queens, which opened in 1988 as a connection between the IND Queens Boulevard and IND Crosstown lines, was expanded by adding a passageway to the IRT Flushing Line on June 3, 2011. A free transfer from the Broadway – Lafayette Street (IND Sixth Avenue Line) to the uptown platform of the Bleecker Street (IRT Lexington Avenue Line) opened on September 25, 2012.[7] A transfer to the downtown platform has existed since the 1950s.

Manhattan[edit]

Lower Manhattan (14th Street and below)[edit]

Station complex Individual stations Lines Services Notes
14th Street / Sixth Avenue 14th Street IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line       1 all times
      2 all times
      3 all except late nights
The IND Sixth Avenue Line and BMT Canarsie Line were connected inside fare control in the late 1960s,[citation needed] and a passageway west to the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line opened on January 16, 1978.[8]
14th Street IND Sixth Avenue Line       F all times
      M weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
Sixth Avenue BMT Canarsie Line       L all times
14th Street – Eighth Avenue 14th Street IND Eighth Avenue Line       A all times
      C all except late nights
      E all times
The transfer passageway between the IND Eighth Avenue Line and BMT Canarsie Line was placed inside fare control on July 1, 1948.[5]
Eighth Avenue BMT Canarsie Line       L all times
14th Street – Union Square 14th Street – Union Square BMT Broadway Line       N all times
      Q all times
      R all except late nights
The BMT Broadway Line, BMT Canarsie Line, and IRT Lexington Avenue Line are linked by passageways at Union Square. The two BMT lines were connected on June 30, 1924, when the Canarsie Line opened.[9] A passageway to the IRT was placed inside fare control on July 1, 1948.[5]
Union Square BMT Canarsie Line       L all times
14th Street – Union Square IRT Lexington Avenue Line       4 all times
      5 all except late nights
      6 all times <6>weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
Bleecker Street / Broadway – Lafayette Street Bleecker Street IRT Lexington Avenue Line       4 late nights
      6 all times <6>weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
A transfer passageway between the southbound IRT Lexington Avenue Line and both directions of the IND Sixth Avenue Line was placed inside fare control on May 19, 1957.[10] The Bleecker Street uptown platform was remodeled to provide an easier transfer to/from the Broadway-Lafayette Street station and opened on March 26, 2012. However, the northbound transfer didn't open for the Lexington Avenue line until September 25, 2012, when the station became ADA-accessible.[7]
Broadway – Lafayette Street IND Sixth Avenue Line       B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
      D all times
      F all times
      M weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
Brooklyn Bridge – City Hall / Chambers Street Brooklyn Bridge – City Hall IRT Lexington Avenue Line       4 all times
      5 all except late nights
      6 all times <6>weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
These two adjacent stations on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line and BMT Nassau Street Line are connected by two passageways. The south one opened in 1914,[4] and was placed inside fare control on July 1, 1948.[5] A second passageway, at the north end of the stations, was opened in the evening of September 1, 1962, when the Lexington Avenue Line platforms were extended and the Worth Street station was closed.[11]
Chambers Street BMT Nassau Street Line       J all times
      Z rush hours, peak direction
Canal Street Canal Street (lower level – express) BMT Broadway Line       N all except late nights
      Q all times
The lower level of the BMT Broadway Line is linked to the upper level of the BMT Broadway Line, the IRT Lexington Avenue Line and the BMT Nassau Street Line via passageways. The three BMT stations were linked on September 4, 1917, when the Broadway Line opened.[citation needed] The IRT was connected on January 16, 1978.[8]
Canal Street (upper level – local) BMT Broadway Line       N late nights
      R all except late nights
Canal Street IRT Lexington Avenue Line       4 late nights
      6 all times <6>weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
Canal Street BMT Nassau Street Line       J all times
      Z rush hours, peak direction
Chambers Street – World Trade Center / Park Place Chambers Street IND Eighth Avenue Line       A all times
      C all except late nights
The two halves of the IND Eighth Avenue Line and the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line are connected by passageways. They were opened in the 1950s, before which none of the three parts, not even the two IND stations, were connected.[citation needed]
World Trade Center IND Eighth Avenue Line       E all times
Park Place IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line       2 all times
      3 all except late nights
Delancey Street – Essex Street Delancey Street IND Sixth Avenue Line       F all times A passageway between the IND Sixth Avenue Line and BMT Nassau Street Line was placed inside fare control on July 1, 1948.[citation needed]
Essex Street BMT Nassau Street Line       J all times
      M all times except late nights
      Z rush hours, peak direction
Fulton Street Fulton Street IND Eighth Avenue Line       A all times
      C all except late nights
A complicated network of passageways connects four separate stations on the IND Eighth Avenue Line, IRT Lexington Avenue Line, BMT Nassau Street Line, and IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line. The full transfer system here was formed on July 1, 1948. While the passageways between the Eighth Avenue, Nassau Street, and Broadway–Seventh Avenue platforms all existed at the time, and were simply placed inside fare control, a paper transfer to the Lexington Avenue Line was issued at first,[5] until a new passageway was opened.[citation needed] In December 2010, the Eighth Avenue Line station's name was changed to Fulton Street.
Fulton Street IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line       2 all times
      3 all except late nights
Fulton Street IRT Lexington Avenue Line       4 all times
      5 all except late nights
Fulton Street BMT Nassau Street Line       J weekdays and weekday late nights
      Z rush hours, peak direction
South Ferry – Whitehall Street South Ferry IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line       1 all times A new passageway opened concurrently with the opening of the new South Ferry station on March 16, 2009.[12] This connects the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line with the Whitehall Street station on the BMT Broadway Line.
Whitehall Street – South Ferry BMT Broadway Line       N late nights
      R all except late nights
West Fourth Street – Washington Square lower level IND Sixth Avenue Line       B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
      D all times
      F all times
      M weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
The station became a transfer station when the Sixth Avenue Line opened in 1940.
upper level IND Eighth Avenue Line       A all times
      C all except late nights
      E all times
Former transfers

When the elevated IRT Third Avenue Line closed from Chatham Square to South Ferry on December 22, 1950, a paper transfer was given to the M15 bus route. The Third Avenue Line was closed in Manhattan on May 12, 1955, removing this transfer.[citation needed]

When the new "H" system was implemented on August 1, 1918, the Public Service Commission was unprepared for the heavy traffic using the 42nd Street Shuttle. The shuttle was closed for rebuilding at the end of August 3, and a paper transfer was added between Rector Street on the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line and Wall Street on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line (the only one of the two lines to go to Brooklyn at that time).[13] Shuttle service resumed on September 28, 1918, but the transfer remained, and was expanded to allow transfers from Wall Street on the Brooklyn Branch of the Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line, its temporary end.[14] After the Brooklyn Branch was completed on April 15, 1919, the transfer was no longer needed.[15]

There was never a free transfer between the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line (outer) and IRT Lexington Avenue Line (inner) platforms at South Ferry. However, by 1960, night and weekend Lexington Avenue Line service (5 and 6 trains) stopped at the outer platform. This unadvertised transfer existed until 1977, when Lexington Avenue Line trains stopped running to South Ferry.[16]

Future transfers

The Fulton Center will be connected to the World Trade Center Transportation Hub via the Dey Street Passageway. The passageway will eventually link the Fulton Street station (serving the 2 3 4 5 A C J Z trains) with the WTC Transportation Hub (serving the 1 2 3 A C E N R and PATH trains).

Midtown and Upper Manhattan[edit]

Station complex Individual stations Lines Services Notes
34th Street – Herald Square 34th Street – Herald Square BMT Broadway Line       N all times
      Q all times
      R all except late nights
The BMT Broadway Line and IND Sixth Avenue Line, which lie on top of each other, received a transfer at the time of the July 1, 1948 fare increase. An existing connection was placed inside fare control.[5]
34th Street – Herald Square IND Sixth Avenue Line       B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
      D all times
      F all times
      M weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
Grand Central – 42nd Street Grand Central IRT 42nd Street Shuttle       S all except late nights The subway station at Grand Central Terminal serves the IRT Lexington Avenue Line, IRT Flushing Line, and IRT 42nd Street Shuttle. Connections are closely integrated, since all three lines were operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company. The original station, opened on October 27, 1904, served only the first IRT subway, and is now the shuttle platforms.[17] The Flushing Line station opened on June 22, 1915,[3] and the Lexington Avenue Line station on July 17, 1918,[18] each with direct connections to the existing station.[citation needed] The elevated IRT Second Avenue Line was closed on June 13, 1942, and, starting the next day, a paper transfer[5] was available between the elevated IRT Third Avenue Line and the Grand Central complex. This allowed passengers who had taken the Second Avenue Line over the Queensboro Bridge to instead use the Third Avenue Line to Lower Manhattan.[19] The Third Avenue Line closed on May 12, 1955, ending this transfer.[20]
Grand Central IRT Flushing Line       7 all times <7>rush hours until 10:00 p.m., peak direction
Grand Central – 42nd Street IRT Lexington Avenue Line       4 all times
      5 all except late nights
      6 all times <6>weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
42nd Street IRT Third Avenue Line N/A
Times Square – 42nd Street / Port Authority Bus Terminal Times Square IRT 42nd Street Shuttle       S all except late nights At Times Square, a number of passageways connect the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line, IRT Flushing Line, IRT 42nd Street Shuttle, and BMT Broadway Line. A block-long passageway west to the IND Eighth Avenue Line is also inside fare control. The first transfer here was between the original IRT subway (now the shuttle platforms) and the Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line, opened on June 3, 1917, when the latter line opened as a shuttle to 34th Street – Penn Station.[21] The Flushing Line was extended to Times Square on March 14, 1927,[22] and a passageway connecting the IRT and BMT was placed inside fare control on July 1, 1948.[5] The same was done with the connection to the Eighth Avenue Line in December 1988.[23]
Times Square – 42nd Street BMT Broadway Line       N all times
      Q all times
      R all except late nights
Times Square – 42nd Street IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line       1 all times
      2 all times
      3 all times
Times Square IRT Flushing Line       7 all times <7>rush hours until 10:00 p.m., peak direction
42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal IND Eighth Avenue Line       A all times
      C all except late nights
      E all times
42nd Street / Fifth Avenue – Bryant Park 42nd Street – Bryant Park IND Sixth Avenue Line       B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
      D all times
      F all times
      M weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
A paper transfer[24] was added between the IND Sixth Avenue Line and IRT Flushing Line at Bryant Park on July 1, 1968, when KK service started and the new 57th Street station opened. The transfer was only valid on weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. until a passageway was opened[25] by 1971.[26]
Fifth Avenue IRT Flushing Line       7 all times <7>rush hours until 10:00 p.m., peak direction
50th Street upper level IND Eighth Avenue Line       A late nights
      C all except late nights
The station became a transfer station when the Queens Boulevard Line opened in 1933. There is no free connection between trains in opposite directions. A free transfer only exists between the northbound (uptown) services and another exists between the southbound (downtown) services.
lower level IND Queens Boulevard Line       E all times
Lexington Avenue / 51st – 53rd Streets 51st Street IRT Lexington Avenue Line       4 late nights
      6 all times <6>weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
A passageway connects these two stations on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line and IND Queens Boulevard Line. The $13 million tunnel was paid for by Boston Properties, who was building an office tower on the southeast corner of Lexington Avenue and 53rd Street, in exchange for a zoning bonus of 20% more space, and opened in early November 1986.[27][28]
Lexington Avenue – 53rd Street IND Queens Boulevard Line       E all times
      M weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
Seventh Avenue cross-platform interchange on two levels IND Sixth Avenue Line       B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
      D all times
The station became a transfer station when the Sixth Avenue Line opened in 1940.
IND Queens Boulevard Line       E all times
59th Street – Columbus Circle 59th Street – Columbus Circle IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line       1 all times
      2 late nights
The IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line and IND Eighth Avenue Line stations at Columbus Circle, which lie above each other, are connected by a passageway that was placed inside fare control on July 1, 1948.[5]
59th Street – Columbus Circle IND Eighth Avenue Line       A all times
      B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
      C all except late nights
      D all times
Lexington Avenue / 59th–63rd Streets 59th Street IRT Lexington Avenue Line       4 all times
      5 all except late nights
      6 all times <6>weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
The passageways between the Broadway Line and the upper-level local Lexington Avenue Line stations were placed inside fare control on July 1, 1948.[5] When the lower-level express Lexington Avenue platforms opened in 1962 to relieve congestion at the Grand Central – 42nd Street transfer point, those platforms were connected to the local platforms and Broadway Line platforms above. A MetroCard transfer to the IND 63rd Street Line was added on December 16, 2001, when the Queens section of that line was completed. Since the F had moved to the new line, there was no longer a direct transfer to the Lexington Avenue Line, and so this transfer was added with an above-ground walk, free for MetroCard users within two hours of the original boarding.[29][30]
Lexington Avenue / 59th Street BMT Broadway Line       N all times
      Q weekdays
      R all except late nights
Lexington Avenue – 63rd Street IND 63rd Street Line       F all times
145th Street upper level IND Eighth Avenue Line       A all times
      C all except late nights
The station became a transfer station when the Concourse Line opened in 1933.
lower level IND Concourse Line       B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
      D all times
168th Street 168th Street IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line       1 all times At the crossing of the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line and IND Eighth Avenue Line in Washington Heights, a passageway connects the two stations. It was placed inside fare control on July 1, 1948.[5]
168th Street IND Eighth Avenue Line       A all times
      C all except late nights
Former transfers

A paper transfer[5] at the Polo Grounds (155th Street), between the IND Concourse Line and Polo Grounds Shuttle, was created on June 12, 1940, immediately after the IRT Ninth Avenue Line was closed south of 155th Street. It, along with the new transfer at 161st Street – Yankee Stadium, allowed passengers who had taken the Ninth Avenue Line from the IRT Jerome Avenue Line in the Bronx to use the IND Concourse Line and IND Eighth Avenue Line.[31] The Polo Grounds Shuttle and the transfer were discontinued on August 31, 1958.[32]

The Bronx[edit]

Station complex Individual stations Lines Services Notes
149th Street – Grand Concourse 149th Street – Grand Concourse IRT Jerome Avenue Line       4 all times The station became a transfer station when the Jerome Avenue Line opened in 1917. The upper-level Jerome Avenue platforms and the lower-level White Plains Road platforms are perpendicular to each other.
149th Street – Grand Concourse IRT White Plains Road Line       2 all times
      5 all except late nights
161st Street – Yankee Stadium 161st Street – Yankee Stadium IND Concourse Line       B rush hours until 7:00 p.m.
      D all except rush hours, peak direction
A passageway connects the elevated IRT Jerome Avenue Line and underground IND Concourse Line at Yankee Stadium. The free transfer was added on June 12, 1940 as a paper transfer,[5] replacing the closed IRT Ninth Avenue Line through Manhattan. Passengers that had transferred from the Jerome Avenue Line to the Ninth Avenue Line could now use the Concourse Line and IND Eighth Avenue Line, or alternately use the Polo Grounds Shuttle and another new transfer to the Concourse Line at 155th Street.[31] A passageway was later built inside fare control.[citation needed]
161st Street – Yankee Stadium IRT Jerome Avenue Line       4 all times
Former transfers

The first portion of the IRT White Plains Road Line opened on November 26, 1904 as a branch from the elevated IRT Third Avenue Line north of 149th Street to 180th Street – Bronx Park in West Farms.[33] It was connected into the original IRT subway on July 10, 1905, and Third Avenue service was ended.[34] Transfers were given at 149th Street for passengers who wanted to change to Third Avenue, and transfers were added between the Manhattan-bound subway and the Third Avenue Line to the north on July 13 due to the "congestion and confusion" at that point. These transfers originally only applied to trains continuing in the same direction;[35][36] by the 1920s, this transfer point had become very congested. A passageway inside fare control was opened on June 1, 1927 in the triangle bounded by 148th Street, Third Avenue, and Willis Avenue.[37][38] The Third Avenue Line closed on April 28, 1973, ending the transfer.[39]

The IRT Dyre Avenue Line opened on May 15, 1941. At first, it did not connect directly to the IRT White Plains Road Line, and a transfer passageway (used by the New York, Westchester and Boston Railway when the Dyre Avenue Line tracks were part of its operation) was placed inside fare control.[40] A direct connection to the White Plains Road Line north of the station opened on May 6, 1957,[41] and the old NYW&B station was closed.[citation needed]

Brooklyn[edit]

Station complex Individual stations Lines Services Notes
Fourth Avenue / Ninth Street Fourth Avenue IND Culver Line       F all times
      G all times
A transfer between the BMT Fourth Avenue Line and IND Culver Line was added in the 1950s.[citation needed]
Ninth Street BMT Fourth Avenue Line       D late nights
      N late nights
      R all except late nights
Atlantic Avenue – Barclays Center Atlantic Avenue – Barclays Center BMT Brighton Line       B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
      Q all times
Passageways connect the BMT Fourth Avenue Line and BMT Brighton Line, with the IRT Eastern Parkway Line in the middle. The passageway between the Brighton and Eastern Parkway Lines was added on November 26, 1967, when the Chrystie Street Connection opened and most Brighton Line trains were sent to the IND Sixth Avenue Line.[42] The transfer to the Fourth Avenue Line was added on January 16, 1978.[8]
Atlantic Avenue – Barclays Center IRT Eastern Parkway Line       2 all times
      3 all except late nights
      4 all times
      5 weekdays until 8:45 p.m.
Atlantic Avenue – Barclays Center BMT Fourth Avenue Line       D all times
      N all times
      R all except late nights
Broadway Junction Broadway Junction BMT Canarsie Line       L all times The elevated BMT Jamaica Line and BMT Canarsie Line and underground IND Fulton Street Line are connected by passageways inside fare control. This was originally the site of a transfer station between the BMT Fulton Street Line and the other two lines, but the Fulton Street portion was removed as part of the Dual Contracts rebuilding.[citation needed] The passageway connecting to the IND Fulton Street Line was placed inside fare control on July 1, 1948.[5]
Broadway Junction IND Fulton Street Line       A all times
      C all except late nights
Broadway Junction BMT Jamaica Line       J all times
      Z rush hours, peak direction
Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue four island platforms, one for each line, on the same level BMT Brighton Line       Q all times The first connection between lines was between the Sea Beach and the West End lines on December 23, 1918. The Brighton Line platform opened on May 29, 1919 followed by the Culver Line on May 1, 1920. When the Culver Line passed from BMT to IND control in 1954, the transfer became inter-division. The station is a terminal for all four lines and services.
IND Culver Line       F all times
BMT Sea Beach Line       N all times
BMT West End Line       D all times
Court Street – Borough Hall Borough Hall IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line       2 all times
      3 all except late nights
The BMT Fourth Avenue Line is connected to the IRT Eastern Parkway Line and IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line via a passageway at Borough Hall. This was placed inside fare control on July 1, 1948.[5]
Borough Hall IRT Eastern Parkway Line       4 all times
      5 weekdays until 8:45 p.m.
Court Street BMT Fourth Avenue Line       N late nights
      R all except late nights
DeKalb Avenue cross-platform interchange BMT Fourth Avenue Line       D late nights
      N late nights
      R all except late nights
This station, opened on June 19, 1915 and completed on August 1, 1920, has been a major transfer point between BMT services, with the lines splitting north and south of the station.
BMT Brighton Line       B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
      Q all times
Franklin Avenue – Fulton Street Franklin Avenue BMT Franklin Avenue Line       S all times A passageway connects the underground IND Fulton Street Line and the end of the elevated BMT Franklin Avenue Line. The transfer here was added on June 1, 1940, immediately after the elevated BMT Fulton Street Line (to which Franklin Avenue Line passengers could transfer) closed.[43] Transfers were made with paper transfer slips[5] until October 18, 1999, when the Franklin Avenue Line reopened after reconstruction, doing away with the last remaining paper transfer on the Subway.[44]
Franklin Avenue IND Fulton Street Line       A late nights
      C all except late nights
Franklin Avenue BMT Fulton Street Line N/A
Franklin Avenue – Botanic Garden Botanic Garden BMT Franklin Avenue Line       S all times A transfer passageway between the IRT Eastern Parkway Line and BMT Franklin Avenue Line was added on October 18, 1999, when the Franklin Avenue Line was reopened.[44] It was formerly occupied and blocked by a Transit police station.[citation needed]
Franklin Avenue IRT Eastern Parkway Line       2 all times
      3 all except late nights
      4 all times
      5 weekdays until 8:45 p.m.
Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets cross-platform interchange IND Crosstown Line       G all times The station is laid out on six tracks: the two innermost tracks serve the Crosstown Line, the next two outer tracks serve the express Fulton Street Line and the outermost two serve the local Fulton Street Line. The station became a transfer station upon its opening on April 9, 1936 between Fulton Street Line trains running to/from Manhattan on the Fulton Street express tracks and the HH (Court Street Shuttle) on the Fulton Street local tracks. (The shuttle was discontinued on June 1, 1946.) The Crosstown Line and its transfer opened on July 1, 1937.
IND Fulton Street Line       A all times
      C all except late nights
Jay Street – MetroTech cross-platform interchange IND Culver Line       F all times The station became a cross-platform transfer station when the Fulton Street Line opened in 1936. A transfer passageway was opened to the BMT Fourth Avenue Line on December 10, 2010, concurrently with renaming the complex to Jay Street – MetroTech.[45][46]
IND Fulton Street Line       A all times
      C all except late nights
Jay Street – MetroTech BMT Fourth Avenue Line       N late nights
      R all except late nights
Lorimer Street / Metropolitan Avenue Lorimer Street BMT Canarsie Line       L all times A passageway between the BMT Canarsie Line and IND Crosstown Line was placed inside fare control on July 1, 1948.[5]
Metropolitan Avenue IND Crosstown Line       G all times
Myrtle–Wyckoff Avenues Myrtle–Wyckoff Avenues BMT Canarsie Line       L all times The station became a transfer station when the Canarsie Line opened in 1928.
Myrtle–Wyckoff Avenues BMT Myrtle Avenue Line       M all times
New Utrecht Avenue / 62nd Street 62nd Street BMT West End Line       D all times The station became a transfer station when the West End Line opened in 1916.
New Utrecht Avenue BMT Sea Beach Line       N all times
Prospect Park cross-platform interchange BMT Brighton Line       B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
      Q all times
The station became a transfer station when the connection to the Brighton Line subway from Seventh Avenue opened in 1920.
BMT Franklin Avenue Line       S all times
Rockaway Parkway same-level interchange BMT Canarsie Line       L all times The BMT Canarsie Line on the surface south of Rockaway Parkway became a streetcar line on October 26, 1917 with a free transfer to the Canarsie Line. On November 21, 1942, the private right-of-way was closed, and the transfer was instead given to the Rockaway Parkway Line, now the B42 bus route. The streetcars, later buses, stop inside fare control.[47]
Rockaway Parkway Line B42 bus
West Eighth Street – New York Aquarium upper level BMT Brighton Line       Q all times Prior to the opening of the Culver Line in 1920, local Brighton Line trains used the lower level and express Brighton Line trains used the upper level. The transfer station commenced with the opening of the Culver Line on the lower level under the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company (the predecessor to the BMT). Level usage varied over the years with different Brighton services using the lower level at different times. When the Culver Line passed from BMT to IND control in 1954, the transfer became inter-division. Shortly thereafter, the Brighton Line track connection to the lower level was severed, thereby allowing each line to have exclusive use of their own levels.
lower level IND Culver Line       F all times
Former transfers

On October 30, 1954, a connection between the IND Brooklyn Line and the BMT Culver Line opened, and the Culver Line was transferred from BMT to IND control. Service through the new connection commenced, and the BMT Culver Shuttle was instituted between Ditmas Avenue and Ninth Avenue, making Ditmas Avenue an inter-division transfer station. When the BMT Culver Shuttle ceased on May 11, 1975, the station was left to be served by the IND Culver Line only.

On March 5, 1944, when the elevated BMT Myrtle Avenue Line was removed from the Brooklyn Bridge elevated tracks, and cut back from Park Row to Bridge–Jay Streets, a paper transfer was added at Bridge–Jay Streets to the Brooklyn Bridge trolley lines, specifically the Smith Street Line, DeKalb Avenue Line, and Seventh Avenue Line.[48] Bridge trolleys were discontinued on March 6, 1950, and the transfer was replaced with one to the IND Sixth Avenue Line. Manhattan-bound passengers received a transfer when boarding the Myrtle Avenue Line west of Broadway, but Brooklyn-bound passengers could only get one when entering at Broadway – Nassau Street, near Park Row.[49] In addition, similar trolley transfers were provided at High Street – Brooklyn Bridge, at the Brooklyn end of the bridge.[50] The Myrtle Avenue Line west of Broadway closed on October 3, 1969,[51] and the transfer was replaced with one to the B54 bus route, which ran under the line. The transfers at High Street – Brooklyn Bridge were discontinued at some point, but the B54 transfer remained for a long time.[citation needed]

When the Broadway Elevated spur to Broadway Ferry closed to passengers on July 2, 1916, a paper transfer was added to the Broadway Ferry Shuttle streetcar line. The shuttle was moved from Broadway Ferry to Lorimer Street when the BMT Canarsie Line opened through Williamsburg on June 30, 1924, and Broadway Line streetcars were rerouted to the ferry. Later the transfer was to the Meeker Avenue Line, now part of the B24 bus route.[citation needed]

Notice of free transfers at Rockaway Avenue

A paper transfer[5] was added at Rockaway Avenue between the temporary east end of the underground IND Fulton Street Line and the new west end of the elevated BMT Fulton Street Line, immediately after the BMT Fulton Street Line was closed west of Rockaway Avenue on June 1, 1940.[43] When the BMT Fulton Street Line was closed east of Rockaway Avenue on April 27, 1956, these transfers were discontinued.[52]

The lower level, serving the Jamaica Line, opened in 1888. The station became a transfer station when the Myrtle Avenue Elevated platform on the upper level opened in 1889. When Myrtle Avenue Line service west of this station ended in 1969, the upper level was abandoned and all Myrtle Avenue Line trains from the east merged onto the Jamaica Line tracks.

Queens[edit]

Station complex Individual stations Lines Services Notes
Court Square Court Square – 23rd Street IND Queens Boulevard Line       E all times
      M weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
An $8.5 million 350-foot (100 m) passageway connecting the IND Queens Boulevard Line with the IND Crosstown Line was built by Citicorp, who was building the Citicorp Building above. It opened in December 1988.[53][54][55] A MetroCard transfer to the IRT Flushing Line was added on December 16, 2001, when the IND 63rd Street Line was completed and the G was cut back to Court Square during peak hours. This transfer was free for MetroCard users within two hours of the original boarding.[30] Soon after, a moving walkway was added in the IND passageway.[29] A passageway was completed in June 2011 between the Flushing and Crosstown lines, which ended the MetroCard transfer.
Court Square IND Crosstown Line       G all times
Court Square IRT Flushing Line       7 all times <7>rush hours until 10:00 p.m., peak direction
Jamaica Center – Parsons/Archer lower level BMT Jamaica Line       J all times
      Z rush hours, peak direction
Both levels of the station opened on December 11, 1988.
upper level IND Queens Boulevard Line       E all times
Queensboro Plaza cross-platform interchange on two levels BMT Astoria Line       N all times
      Q weekdays
As part of the Dual Contracts, the Astoria Line and Flushing Line were operated by both the Interborough Rapid Transit Company and the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation. This arrangement remained through unification, until, starting October 17, 1949, the Astoria Line became BMT-only and the Flushing Line IRT-only. A cross-platform transfer at Queensboro Plaza, where the lines meet, was made available by closing the north (BMT) half of the station and routing all trains into the south (IRT) half.[56]
IRT Flushing Line       7 all times <7>rush hours until 10:00 p.m., peak direction
Queensboro Plaza IRT Second Avenue Line N/A
Roosevelt Avenue / 74th Street 74th Street – Broadway IRT Flushing Line       7 all times The elevated IRT Flushing Line and underground IND Queens Boulevard Line are connected inside fare control in Jackson Heights. A paper transfer was added on July 1, 1948,[5] and was later replaced by a passageway.[when?]
Jackson Heights – Roosevelt Avenue IND Queens Boulevard Line       E all times
      F all times
      M weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
      R all hours except late nights
Sutphin Boulevard – Archer Avenue – JFK Airport lower level BMT Jamaica Line       J all times
      Z rush hours, peak direction
Both levels of the station opened on December 11, 1988.
upper level IND Queens Boulevard Line       E all times

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Both station counts (dependent on consideration of station complexes) include the one temporarily closed station: Cortlandt Street on the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line.
  2. ^ For example, the 145th Street (IND Eighth Avenue Line) station is included, because its two levels are considered parts of two different lines, while the 125th Street (IND Eighth Avenue Line) station, serving the same set of services, is not included, because all its tracks belong to one line.
  3. ^ a b New York Times, Steinway Tunnel Will Open Today, June 22, 1915, page 10
  4. ^ a b Joseph Brennan, Abandoned Stations: Chambers St closed platforms, accessed April 23, 2007
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s New York Times, Transfer Points Under Higher Fare, June 30, 1948, page 19
  6. ^ Mancini, John (December 10, 2010). "MTA Unveils New Jay Street/MetroTech Station In Downtown Brooklyn". NY1. Retrieved May 14, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b Redwine, Tina (September 25, 2012). "Transfers At Bleecker Street Are No Longer A Bleak Situation". NY1. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  8. ^ a b c New York Times, City Subways Add 3 Transfer Points, January 16, 1978, page B2
  9. ^ New York Times, 14th St. Subway to Open Tomorrow, June 29, 1924, page E1
  10. ^ Chan, Sewell (2005-05-07). "With Connection on No. 6 Line, a Manhattan Transfer Is Coming". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-04-27. 
  11. ^ New York Times, New Platform for IRT Locals at Brooklyn Bridge to End Jams, September 1, 1962, page 42
  12. ^ MTA Opens New South Ferry Station Retrieved March 16, 2009
  13. ^ New York Times, Drop Shuttle Plan as Subway Crush Becomes a Peril, August 3, 1918, page 1
  14. ^ New York Times, Subway Shuttle Resumes Today, September 28, 1918
  15. ^ New York Times, Open Clark Street Line, April 16, 1919, page 18
  16. ^ Joseph Brennan, Abandoned Stations: Bowling Green & South Ferry platforms, accessed April 24, 2007
  17. ^ New York Times, Our Subway Open: 150,000 Try It, October 28, 1904
  18. ^ New York Times, Lexington Av. Line to be Opened Today, July 17, 1918, page 13
  19. ^ New York Times, 'El' Will Cease Saturday, June 7, 1942, page 31
  20. ^ Ralph Katz, New York Times, Last Train Rumbles on Third Ave. 'El', May 13, 1955, page 1
  21. ^ New York Times, Three New Links of the Dual Subway System Opened, Including a Shuttle Service from Times Square to Thirty-Fourth Street, June 3, 1917, page 33
  22. ^ New York Times, New Queens Subway Opened to Times Sq., March 15, 1927, page 1
  23. ^ Lower left front.
  24. ^ New York City Transit Authority, transfer tickets
  25. ^ New York Times, Skip-Stop Subway Begins Run Today, July 1, 1948, page 25
  26. ^ Dudley Dalton, New York Times, Subway Murals Depict History of Bryant Park Area, September 26, 1971, page S30
  27. ^ Albert Scardino, New York Times, Subterranean Engineers, October 27, 1986, page D1
  28. ^ Anthony DePalma, New York Times, In a New Tower, a Waiting Rental Strategy Works, December 7, 1986, page A7
  29. ^ a b New York Times, V Train Begins Service Today, Giving Queens Commuters Another Option, December 17, 2001, page F1
  30. ^ a b New York City Transit Authority, The Opening of the new 63 St Connector, November 2001
  31. ^ a b New York Times, Two 'El' Lines End Transit Service, June 12, 1940, page 27
  32. ^ New York Times, 155th St. El Expires, September 1, 1958, page 27
  33. ^ New York Times, Trains on the Viaduct, November 26, 1904, page 1
  34. ^ New York Times, Subway Trains Running from Bronx to Battery, July 10, 1905, page 1
  35. ^ New York Times, Free Bronx Transfers Ordered by Belmont, July 12, 1905, page 14
  36. ^ Brooklyn Daily Eagle Almanac, 1916
  37. ^ New York Times, Plan Safety Aisle to End Subway Jam, February 1, 1925, page E1
  38. ^ New York Times, Transit Arcade in Bronx, June 1, 1927, page 24
  39. ^ New York Times, Third Ave. El Reaches the End of Its Long, Noisy, Blighted, Nostalgic Line, [{April 29], 1973, page 24
  40. ^ New York Times, Bronx Transit Link to Open Tomorrow, May 14, 1941, page 23
  41. ^ New York Times, Subway Trains Run to Dyre Ave., May 7, 1957, page 37
  42. ^ Emanuel Perlmutter, New York Times, Subway Changes to Speed Service, November 16, 1967, page 1
  43. ^ a b New York Times, B.M.T. 'El' Lines to Shift Service, May 27, 1940, page 19
  44. ^ a b Thomas J. Lueck, New York Times, Subway Shuttle Gets $74 Million Makeover, October 18, 1999, page B3
  45. ^ John Mancini (December 3, 2010). "Long-Awaited Subway Transfers To Open In Brooklyn, Queens". NY1. Retrieved December 12, 2010. 
  46. ^ "Welcome to the New Jay Street/MetroTech Station!". MTA.info. December 10, 2010. Retrieved 2010-12-12. 
  47. ^ "Rockaway Parkway". Retrieved April 18, 2012. 
  48. ^ New York Times, Last 'El' Train Over Brooklyn Bridge Carries Few to Mourn Over Time's Changes, March 6, 1944, page 21
  49. ^ New York City Transit Authority, Official New York City Subway Map and Station Guide, 1959
  50. ^ New York Times, Bridge Trolleys Vanish on Monday, March 2, 1950, page 24
  51. ^ New York Times, 1,200 on Last Trip on Myrtle Ave. El, October 4, 1969, page 23
  52. ^ New York Times, First Leg of Rockaways Transit Opened at Cost of $10,154,702, April 30, 1956, page 24
  53. ^ Alan S. Oser, New York Times, Perspectives: Offices in Queens, May 17, 1987, page A9
  54. ^ Anthony DePalma, New York Times, A Giant to Dominate Low-Rise Queens, August 7, 1988, page A7
  55. ^ Bruce Lambert, New York Times, Citicorp's Tower: Still a Majestic Misfit, February 6, 1994, page A10
  56. ^ New York Times, Direct Subway Runs to Flushing, Astoria, October 15, 1949, page 17