Woodrow Wilson Foundation

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This article is about the publication and awards foundation. For fellowships see Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation.
The armillary sphere presented to the United Nations by the Woodrow Wilson Foundation and installed at the UN's Geneva office

The Woodrow Wilson Foundation was an educational non-profit created in 1922, organized under the laws of New York, for the "perpetuation of Wilson's ideals" through publications and support of research. Franklin D. Roosevelt was the national chairman,[1] and there were local chairmen in each of the 48 states.[2] The initial goal of the foundation was 1 million dollars.[3] Among the foundation’s goals was the establishment of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award for distinguished public service.

In 1963, the Foundation undertook the financial responsibility for the completion of The Papers of Woodrow Wilson,[4] a 69 volume edition of all of Wilson's papers, which was jointly sponsored by Princeton University. Princeton housed Wilson’s papers and provided the staff for the project. The first volume was published in 1966 and the final volume in 1994.[5] This project consumed all of the energies and funds of the foundation during its thirty year duration. Following the publication of the final volume, the foundation intended to return to its support of research, but the drain of funds had been too great, and the foundation folded in 1993.[6] Various functions of the foundation were turned over to Princeton University.

Award recipients[edit]

The foundation established the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award for "distinguished public service". Later, in 1947, an award was created for the "best book on government, politics, or international affairs." It is awarded by the American Political Science Association (APSA).[7]

Public Service[edit]

Book[edit]

In some years two books were recognized as co-recipients. Winning authors and their books include:[10]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ National committee (1922). The Woodrow Wilson Foundation: A tribute to a great American. Washington, DC.: Woodrow Wilson Foundation. p. 2. OCLC 6541997. 
  2. ^ National committee 1922, pp. 20–23
  3. ^ Staff (21 August 1921). "Arts & Leisure Section: Woodrow Wilson Foundation". The New York Times. p. 61. Archived from the original on 5 November 2012. 
  4. ^ The Papers of Woodrow WilsonOCLC 5030832
  5. ^ The Papers of Woodrow Wilson Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, OCLC 5030832
  6. ^ "Woodrow Wilson Foundation Records, 1906-1993: Preliminary Finding Aid" Mudd Manuscript Library, Princeton University
  7. ^ "Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award" American Political Science Association, accessed 23 December 2008
  8. ^ Truman, Harry S. (10 January 1951). "Remarks at the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award Ceremonies". Archived from the original on 29 November 2008. 
  9. ^ a b c d "The Woodrow Wilson Award for Public Service". The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Archived from the original on 5 June 2011. 
  10. ^ A full list of the book awards is provide at "Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award". American Political Science Association. 
  11. ^ a b Staff (12 September 1959). "U.C. Press Wins Printing Award". Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California). p. B-23, column 8. 
  12. ^ a b "2007 Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award". Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award. American Political Science Association. Archived from the original on 12 June 2008. 
  13. ^ "2008 Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award Recipient". Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award. American Political Science Association. Archived from the original on 22 November 2008. 
  14. ^ Meierhenrich, Jens (2008). The legacies of law: long-run consequences of legal development in South Africa, 1652-2000. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-89873-7. 
  15. ^ "2011 Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award Recipient". Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award. American Political Science Association. Archived from the original on 12 June 2012. 
  16. ^ "2012 Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award Recipient". Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award. American Political Science Association. Retrieved 2 November 2012.