(130391) 2000 JG81

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(130391) 2000 JG81
Discovery [1]
Discovered by La Silla Observatory
Discovery date 6 May 2000
Designations
MPC designation (130391) 2000 JG81
none
twotino[2][3]
Orbital characteristics[4]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc 2937 days (8.04 yr)
Aphelion 61.117 AU (9.1430 Tm)
Perihelion 34.127 AU (5.1053 Tm)
47.622 AU (7.1241 Tm)
Eccentricity 0.28338
328.64 yr (120036 d)
0.00302°/d
21.342°
0° 0m 10.797s / day
Inclination 23.428°
45.927°
169.51°
Earth MOID 33.1226 AU (4.95507 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 28.6966 AU (4.29295 Tm)
Physical characteristics
0.09 (assumed)
8.0

(130391) 2000 JG81, also written as 2000 JG81, is a trans-Neptunian object that resides in the Kuiper belt. It was discovered on 6 May 2000 at the La Silla Observatory in Chile.[4]

It is in a 2:1 orbital resonance with the planet Neptune.

When it was first discovered in 2000, it was assumed to be a plutino at perihelion.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List Of Transneptunian Objects". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  2. ^ "MPEC 2009-J35 :Distant Minor Planets (2009 MAY 29.0 TT)". Minor Planet Center. 8 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  3. ^ Marc W. Buie (28 April 2008). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 130391". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  4. ^ a b "130391 (2000 JG81)". JPL Small-Body Database Browser (2007-05-02 last obs). Retrieved 7 April 2016. 
  5. ^ "MPEC 2000-K31: 2000 JF81, 2000 JG81, 2000 JH81, 2000 KK4, 2000 KL4". Minor Planet Center. 29 May 2000. Archived from the original on 2012-02-22. Retrieved 2009-01-30. 

External links[edit]