.33 Winchester

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.33 Winchester Center Fire
.33 Winchester with .223 Rem and .308 Win.JPG
.33 Winchester Center Fire (center) with .223 Rem (left) and .308 Win (right).
Type Rifle
Place of origin USA
Production history
Designed 1902
Specifications
Bullet diameter .338 in (8.6 mm)
Neck diameter .365 in (9.3 mm)
Shoulder diameter .443 in (11.3 mm)
Base diameter .508 in (12.9 mm)
Rim diameter .610 in (15.5 mm)
Case length 2.11 in (54 mm)
Overall length 2.80 in (71 mm)
Rifling twist 1:12
Primer type large rifle
Ballistic performance
Bullet weight/type Velocity Energy
200 gr (13 g) (factory load) 2,200 ft/s (670 m/s) 2,150 ft·lbf (2,920 J)
200 gr (13 g) 2,220 ft/s (680 m/s) 2,198 ft·lbf (2,980 J)
200 gr (13 g) (maximum) 2,420 ft/s (740 m/s) 2,608 ft·lbf (3,536 J)
Source(s): Barnes & Amber 1972

The .33 Winchester Center Fire (colloquially .33 WCF[1] or .33 Win) is an American centerfire rifle cartridge.

Introduced by Winchester for the Model 1886 lever rifle in 1903, it survived until the Model 86 was dropped in 1936.[2] It was also offered in the Marlin Model 1895 and Winchester's own single-shot Model 1885.[2]

A good round for deer, elk, or black bear in wooded terrain at medium range, it out performs the ballistically similar .35 Remington, and can be improved with modern powders.[2] The .33 WCF was replaced by the more powerful .348 Winchester, and stopped being commercially offered in 1940.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Barnes, p.122.
  2. ^ a b c d Barnes, p.83, ".33 Winchester".

Notes[edit]

  • Barnes, Frank C., ed. by John T. Amber. ".33 Winchester", in Cartridges of the World, pp. 83, 122, & 123. Northfield, IL: DBI Books, 1972. ISBN 0-695-80326-3.