2003 QX113

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2003 QX113
Discovery[1]
Discovery date 2003
Designations
MPC designation 2003 QX113
Detached object[2]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 5
Observation arc 1778 days (4.87 yr)
Aphelion 62.146 AU (9.2969 Tm) (Q)
Perihelion 36.750 AU (5.4977 Tm) (q)
49.448 AU (7.3973 Tm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.25680 (e)
347.72 yr (127004 d)
136.84° (M)
0° 0m 10.205s /day (n)
Inclination 6.7751° (i)
158.07° (Ω)
25.042° (ω)
Earth MOID 35.7537 AU (5.34868 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 31.3004 AU (4.68247 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 505 km (assumed)[4]
0.09 (assumed)
22.6[5]
4.7[3]

2003 QX113, also written as 2003 QX113, is a detached object[2] that was discovered when it was near aphelion. With an absolute magnitude of 4.7,[3] it may be a dwarf planet.[6]

As of February 2016 located 59.9 AU from the Sun,[7] it will have moved beyond 60 AU by 2017 and will reach its aphelion around 2058.[8] It last came to perihelion around 1883.[3] Its current distance makes it one of the twelve most distant known minor planets in the Solar System (see table below).[7]

Size estimate[edit]

When 2003 QX113 was first discovered, it was estimated to have an absolute magnitude (H) of 4.9,[1] giving it an assumed size of only 461 kilometres (286 mi) in diameter.[4] As of 2010, 2003 QX113 is estimated to have a brighter absolute magnitude (H) of 4.7.[3] Assuming it is a trans-Neptunian object with a generic albedo of 0.09, it is about 505 kilometres (314 mi) in diameter.[4]

It has been observed 23 times over six oppositions and has an orbit quality of 4.[3]

The orbit of 2003 QX113 compared to Pluto and Neptune.
Most-distant known objects in the
Solar System as of 7 June 2016[7]
Object name Distance from the Sun (AU) Magnitude
(vmag)
Current Perihelion Aphelion
V774104 103 N/A N/A 24
Eris 96.3 37.8 97.6 18.7
2007 OR10 87.5 33.0 100.8 21.7
Sedna 85.7 76.0 939 21.0
2014 FC69 84.2 40.3 106.9 24.1
2006 QH181 83.5 37.8 96.7 23.6
2012 VP113 83.4 80.5 438 23.4
2013 FY27 80.2 36.1 81.8 22.1
2010 GB174 70.9 48.7 693 25.1
2012 FH84 68.5 45.8 80.6 25.7
2015 GP50 67.9 35.9 89.1 24.8
2013 FQ28 67.4 48.7 80.6 24.4
2015 RR245 64.1 33.7 129.2 22.1
2000 CR105 60.6 44.3 412 23.9
2008 ST291 59.9 42.4 154.5 22.2
2003 QX113 59.9 36.7 62.1 22.5
2015 KH162 59.1 41.5 82.8 21.6
Including all known objects currently located at least twice as far as Neptune.[7]
See List of trans-Neptunian objects for more.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Marsden, Brian G. (2006-04-22). "MPEC 2006-H29 : 45 NEW MULTIPLE-OPPOSITION TNOs". IAU Minor Planet Center. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Retrieved 2010-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b Marc W. Buie. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 03QX113" (last observation: 2008-05-05 using 23 of 23 observations over 4.87 years). SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2009-03-23. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2003 QX113)" (last observation: 2008-05-05; arc: 4.87 years). Retrieved 30 March 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c Wm. Robert Johnston (22 August 2008). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Archived from the original on 2009-04-18. Retrieved 2009-03-23. 
  5. ^ "AstDyS 2003QX113 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Archived from the original on 2009-05-14. Retrieved 2009-03-23. 
  6. ^ "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system?". Gps.caltech.edu. 2015-07-21. Retrieved 2015-07-22. 
  7. ^ a b c d "AstDyS-2, Asteroids - Dynamic Site". 2016-02-26. Retrieved 2016-02-29. Objects with distance from Sun over 59 AU 
  8. ^ "Horizon Online Ephemeris System". California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 2009-03-23. 

External links[edit]