Ayungon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Ayungon, Negros Oriental)
Jump to: navigation, search
Ayungon
Municipality
Municipality of Ayungon
Map of Negros Oriental with Ayungon highlighted
Map of Negros Oriental with Ayungon highlighted
Ayungon is located in Philippines
Ayungon
Ayungon
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 9°51′N 123°08′E / 9.85°N 123.13°E / 9.85; 123.13Coordinates: 9°51′N 123°08′E / 9.85°N 123.13°E / 9.85; 123.13
Country  Philippines
Region Central Visayas (Region VII)
Province Negros Oriental
District 1st district of Negros Oriental
Barangays 24 (see Barangays)
Government[1]
 • Type Sangguniang Bayan
 • Mayor Edsel G. Enardecido
 • Vice Mayor Erwin Agustino
 • Electorate 25,599 voters (2016)
Area[2]
 • Total 265.10 km2 (102.36 sq mi)
Population (2015 census)[3]
 • Total 46,303
 • Density 170/km2 (450/sq mi)
Time zone PST (UTC+8)
ZIP code 6210
PSGC 074602000
IDD:area code +63 (0)35
Climate type tropical climate
Income class 2nd municipal income class
Website www.ayungon.gov.ph

Ayungon, officially the Municipality of Ayungon, is a 2nd class municipality in the province of Negros Oriental, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 46,303 people.[3]

History[edit]

It is said that Ayungon is derived from the name of a deaf man, “Ayung,” who cut down a “dungon” tree. Old municipal profiles refer to Ayungon as Todos los Santos though there are no legends to explain that Hispanic name, just as there are no tales elaborating on the ruins of apparently Hispanic fortifications on the Tampocon II shoreline, perhaps because Ayungon’s colonial past was not entirely its own: for many years it was a mere barrio of Tayasan, until 1924 when Governor General Leonard Wood came to establish Ayungon as a full-fledged municipality.

Although firing up its economic dynamos to catch up with provincial developments, Ayungon retains its rural charm through vast and scenic rice fields, dense coconut groves and expansive plantations of sugar cane, bananas and pineapple.

Of only three virgin forests said to be still remaining on Negros Island, one is located in Banban, Ayungon. Nature lovers will be regaled by sightings in the Karalaon Bird Sanctuary, the subterranean drama of the Mabato Caves, and the postcard-pretty Pagsalsalan Twin Falls.

Ayungon is located on the midriff of Oriental Negros’ northern stretch, approximately two hours from Dumaguete City.[4]

Barangays[edit]

Ayungon is politically subdivided into 24 barangays.

  • Amdus
  • Anibong
  • Atabay
  • Awa-an
  • Ban-ban
  • Calagcalag
  • Candana-ay
  • Carol-an
  • Gomentoc
  • Inacban
  • Iniban
  • Jandalamanon
  • Kilaban
  • Lamigan
  • Maaslum
  • Mabato
  • Manogtong
  • Nabhang
  • Poblacion
  • Tambo
  • Tampocon I
  • Tampocon II
  • Tibyawan
  • Tiguib

Demographics[edit]

Population census of Ayungon
Year Pop. ±% p.a.
1939 12,777 —    
1948 14,797 +1.64%
1960 21,539 +3.18%
1970 23,165 +0.73%
1975 23,639 +0.41%
1980 27,656 +3.19%
1990 33,317 +1.88%
1995 36,928 +1.95%
2000 40,744 +2.13%
2007 42,643 +0.63%
2010 46,146 +2.91%
2015 46,303 +0.06%
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[3][5][6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Municipality". Quezon City, Philippines: Department of the Interior and Local Government. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  2. ^ "Province:". PSGC Interactive. Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 12 November 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c Census of Population (2015). "Region VII (Central Visayas)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. PSA. Retrieved 20 June 2016. 
  4. ^ Negros Oriental Tourism "[1]", About | Cities & Towns. Retrieved 2013-05-28.
  5. ^ Census of Population and Housing (2010). "Region VII (Central Visayas)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. NSO. Retrieved 29 June 2016. 
  6. ^ Census of Population (1995, 2000 and 2007). "Region VII (Central Visayas)". Total Population by Province, City and Municipality. NSO. Archived from the original on 24 June 2011. 
  7. ^ "Province of". Municipality Population Data. Local Water Utilities Administration Research Division. Retrieved 17 December 2016. 

External links[edit]