BMW M10

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BMW M10
BMW Engine M10.JPG
BMW M10 engine inside
Overview
ManufacturerBMW
Production1962–1988
Layout
ConfigurationStraight-4
Displacement1.5 L; 91.5 cu in (1,499 cc)
1.6 L; 96.0 cu in (1,573 cc)
1.8 L; 107.8 cu in (1,766 cc)
1.8 L; 108.2 cu in (1,773 cc)
2.0 L; 121.4 cu in (1,990 cc)
Cylinder bore82 mm (3.23 in)
84 mm (3.31 in)
89 mm (3.5 in)
Piston stroke71 mm (2.8 in)
80 mm (3.15 in)
Block materialCast iron
Head materialAluminium
ValvetrainSOHC
Compression ratio6.9:1, 8.1:1, 8.3:1, 8.5:1, 8.6:1, 8.8:1, 9.0:1, 9.3:1, 9.5:1, 10.0:1, 10.5:1
Combustion
TurbochargerKKK (in 2002 turbo and motorsports versions)
Fuel systemSolex carburetor
Stromberg carburettor
Kugelfischer continous mechanical FI
ManagementBosch Jetronic
Fuel typeGasoline
Cooling systemWater cooled
Output
Power output54–125 kW (72–168 hp)
Torque output118–245 N⋅m (87–181 lb⋅ft)
Chronology
SuccessorBMW M40

The BMW M10 is a straight-4 SOHC piston engine produced from 1962 to 1988 with displacements ranging from 1.5 to 2.0 L; 91.5 to 121.4 cu in (1,499 to 1,990 cc). It was first released in the New Class sedans and began to be phased out following the introduction of the M40 engine in 1987.

The engine was a commercial success for the Bavarian carmaker, with over 3.5 million produced in almost three decades across many BMW models.[1] It has a forged crankshaft, counterbalance weights, five main bearings and a chain-driven camshaft.[2] The block is made from cast iron and the head is made from aluminium.[3]

It was also used as the basis for the turbocharged BMW M12 motorsport engine, which was used in the Formula One racing series by Brabham-BMW and others.

Development[edit]

The engine was designed by engineer and race driver Baron Alex von Falkenhausen.[1] In the late 1950s, he was asked to design a small-displacement (1.3L) engine, but felt that this would be insufficient for the company's future needs. Therefore, he convinced BMW that the capacity should be 1.5L instead and he designed a block that could be expanded to 2.0L in the future. The M10 Engine that resulted had a bore and stroke of 82 by 71 mm (3.23 by 2.80 in) for a displacement of 1.5 L; 91.5 cu in (1,499 cc). It utilized hemispherical combustion chambers, had an aluminum alloy head, and two large valves per cylinder, 39 mm (1.5 in) inlets and 35 mm (1.4 in) exhausts. Power was rated at 80 bhp (60 kW; 81 PS).[4]

Naming conventions[edit]

The engine was initially known as the "M115" (the last two digits representing the 1.5–litre capacity). Over the years, variants of the engine were given various codes (most of them starting with "M1..." and the remaining digits relating to the capacity). In 1975, the engine became known as then "M10", then in 1980 it was given the standardised BMW engine code of M10B18 (where "M10" represents the series and the "18" represents the 1.8–litre capacity).

The M115 and all related engines have become retroactively known as the "M10" family.

Models[edit]

Model Displacement Power Torque Year
M115 1,499 cc (1.5 L; 91.5 cu in) 54 kW (72 hp)
at 5,800 rpm
118 N⋅m (87 lb⋅ft)
at 3,700 rpm
1974–1977
60 kW (80 hp)
at 5,700 rpm
118 N⋅m (87 lb⋅ft)
at 3,000 rpm
1962-1964
M116 1,573 cc (1.6 L; 96.0 cu in) 63 kW (84 hp)
at 5,800 rpm
130 N⋅m (96 lb⋅ft)
at 3,500 rpm
1964–1975
78 kW (105 hp)
at 6,000 rpm
141 N⋅m (104 lb⋅ft)
at 4,500 rpm
1967–1968
M41 67 kW (90 hp)
at 6,000 rpm
167 N⋅m (123 lb⋅ft)
at 4,000 rpm
1975-1980
M98 55 kW (74 hp)
at 5,800 rpm
110 N⋅m (81 lb⋅ft)
at 3,200 rpm
1981-1983
M118 1,766 cc (1.8 L; 107.8 cu in) 67 kW (90 hp)
at 5,250 rpm
144 N⋅m (106 lb⋅ft)
at 3,000 rpm
1963–1974
81 kW (109 hp)
at 5,800 rpm
148 N⋅m (109 lb⋅ft)
at 4,000 rpm
1964–1976
95 kW (127 hp)
at 6,100 rpm
157 N⋅m (116 lb⋅ft)
at 5,100 rpm
1965
M10B18 74 kW (99 hp)
at 5,800 rpm
135 N⋅m (100 lb⋅ft)
at 3,500 rpm
1980-1983
77 kW (103 hp)
at 5,800 rpm
145 N⋅m (107 lb⋅ft)
at 4,500 rpm
1980–1988
M05 1,990 cc (2.0 L; 121.4 cu in) 75 kW (101 hp)
at 5,500 rpm
157 N⋅m (116 lb⋅ft)
at 3,000 rpm
1968–1976
89 kW (119 hp)
at 5,600 rpm
167 N⋅m (123 lb⋅ft)
at 3,500 rpm
1965–1971
M17 84 kW (113 hp)
at 5,800 rpm
165 N⋅m (122 lb⋅ft)
at 3,700 rpm
1972-1977
M15 97 kW (130 hp)
at 5,800 rpm
177 N⋅m (131 lb⋅ft)
at 4,500 rpm
1970–1974
M43 80 kW (107 hp)
at 5,800 rpm
160 N⋅m (118 lb⋅ft)
at 3,700 rpm
1975-1983
M64 92 kW (123 hp)
at 5,700 rpm
175 N⋅m (129 lb⋅ft)
at 4,350 rpm
1975-1979
M10B20 81 kW (109 hp)
at 5,700 rpm
152 N⋅m (112 lb⋅ft)
at 4,350 rpm
1977-1979
M31 1,990 cc (2.0 L; 121.4 cu in)
turbo
125 kW (168 hp)
at 5,800 rpm
245 N⋅m (181 lb⋅ft)
at 4,000 rpm
1973-1975

M115[edit]

The 1.5 L; 91.5 cu in (1,499 cc) M115 produced 56 or 60 kW (76 or 82 PS; 75 or 80 hp),[5][6] depending on the state of tune. Bore and stroke is 82 mm × 71 mm (3.23 in × 2.80 in). Lower power models use an 8.0:1 compression ratio, while higher power models use a ratio of 8.8:1. Fuel is supplied via a Solex 38 PDSI carburettor.

Applications:

M116[edit]

The 1.6 L; 96.0 cu in (1,573 cc) M116 used a Solex 38 PDSI carburettor and produced 63 kW (86 PS; 84 hp). Bore and stroke is 84 mm × 71 mm (3.31 in × 2.80 in), with a compression ratio of 8.6:1.

Applications:

A version using twin Solex 40 PHH carburettors and a compression ratio of 9.5:1 produced 78 kW (106 PS; 105 hp)

Applications:

M41[edit]

The 1.6 L; 96.0 cu in (1,573 cc) M41 produced 67 kW (91 PS; 90 hp) and 123 N⋅m (91 lb⋅ft). It has an 8.3:1 compression ratio and fuel is supplied by a Solex 32 DIDTA carburettor.

Applications:

M98/M99[edit]

The 1.6 L; 96.0 cu in (1,573 cc) M98 produces 55 kW (75 PS; 74 hp).[7] Fuel is supplied by a Pierburg 1B2 carburettor and the compression ratio is 9.5:1. The 1.8 L; 107.8 cu in (1,766 cc) M99 produces 67 kW (91 PS; 90 hp).[8]

Applications:

M118[edit]

The 1.8 L; 108.2 cu in (1,773 cc) M118 produces 66–95 kW (90–129 PS; 89–127 hp),[9] depending on specification, with bore and stroke of 84 mm × 80 mm (3.31 in × 3.15 in).

Applications:

  • 1963-1968 1800: 67 kW (91 PS; 90 hp), 8.6:1 compression, Solex 36-40 PDSI carburettor
  • 1974 E12 518: 67 kW (91 PS; 90 hp), 8.6:1 compression, Solex 38 PDSI carburettor
  • 1963-1966 1800ti: 81 kW (109 hp), 9.5:1 compression, 2x Solex 40 PHH carburettors
  • 1965 1800tiSA: 95 kW (127 hp), 10.5:1 compression, 2x Weber DCOE-45 carburettors

M10B18[edit]

The 1.8 L; 107.8 cu in (1,766 cc) M10B18 produces 74–77 kW (101–105 PS; 99–103 hp), depending on specification. Bore and stroke is 89 mm × 71 mm (3.50 in × 2.80 in).

Applications:

  • 1969-1972 1800: 67 kW (91 PS; 90 hp), 8.6:1 compression, Solex 36-40 PDSI carburettor
  • 1971-1975 BMW 1802: 67 kW (91 PS; 90 hp), 8.6:1 compression, Solex 38 PDSI carburettor
  • 1980-1983 E21 320i/320is (USA): 74 kW (101 PS; 99 hp), 8.8:1 compression, Bosch K-Jetronic continuous mechanical fuel injection
  • 1980-1983 E12 518 (South Africa): 77 kW (103 hp), 10.0:1 compression, Bosch K-Jetronic continuous mechanical fuel injection
  • 1982-1988 E30 318i: 77 kW (105 PS; 103 hp), 10.0:1 compression, Bosch L-Jetronic EFI
  • 1981-1988 E28 518i: 77 kW (105 PS; 103 hp), 9.5:1 compression, Bosch LE-Jetronic continuous mechanical fuel injection.

M05[edit]

The 2.0 L; 121.4 cu in (1,990 cc) M05 has a bore and a stroke of 89 mm × 80 mm (3.50 in × 3.15 in). It produces 75–89 kW (102–121 PS; 101–119 hp), depending on specification.

Applications:

  • 1965-1970 BMW 2000CS: 89 kW (121 PS; 119 hp), 9.3:1 compression, 2x Solex 40 PHH carburettors
  • 1966-1970 BMW 2000C: 75 kW (102 PS; 101 hp), 8.5:1 compression, Solex 40 PDSI carburettor
  • 1966-1972 BMW 2000: 75 kW (102 PS; 101 hp), 8.5:1 compression, Solex 40 PDSI carburettor
  • 1966-1971 BMW 2000ti: 89 kW (121 PS; 119 hp), 9.3:1 compression, 2x Solex 40 PHH carburettors
  • 1968-1976 BMW 2002: 75 kW (102 PS; 101 hp), 8.5:1 compression, Solex 40 PDSI carburettor

M17[edit]

The 2.0 L; 121.4 cu in (1,990 cc) M17 produces 85 kW (116 PS; 114 hp). It has a 175 CDET Stromberg carburettor and a compression ratio of 9.0:1.

They also delivered the 520 with a Solex 4a1

Applications:

M15[edit]

The 2.0 L; 121.4 cu in (1,990 cc) M15 used the Kugelfischer mechanical fuel injection and produced 97 kW (132 PS; 130 hp). It was the famed tii engine.

Applications:

M43[edit]

The 2.0 L; 121.4 cu in (1,990 cc) M43/1 has a compression ratio of 8.1:1 and produces 80 kW (109 PS; 107 hp).

Applications:

  • 1975-1979 E21 320 (Solex 32-32 DIDTA carburettor)
  • 1975-1979 E21 320i (USA only, Bosch K-Jetronic MFI)

M64[edit]

The 2.0 L; 121.4 cu in (1,990 cc) M64 has a compression ratio of 9.3:1, uses K-Jetronic fuel injection and produces 93 kW (126 PS; 125 hp).

Applications:

M31[edit]

The 2.0 L; 121.4 cu in (1,990 cc) M31 used a KKK turbocharger and Kugelfischer P04 mechanical fuel injection with a sliding throttle plate. It has a compression ratio of 6.9:1 and produces 125 kW (170 PS; 168 hp).

Applications:

Performance variants[edit]

M12 turbocharged motorsport version[edit]

The M10 was used as the basis for the highly successful M12 turbocharged motorsport engine.

S14 version[edit]

The S14 engine for the E30 BMW M3 was based upon the M10 block.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "BMW World - M10 Engine". www.usautoparts.net. Archived from the original on 21 April 2012.
  2. ^ "BMW M10 Four Cylinder Engines". www.unixnerd.demon.co.uk. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  3. ^ "M10 - E30 Zone Wiki". www.e30zone.net. Retrieved 28 January 2017.
  4. ^ The cylinder head was alloy with hemispherical combustion chambers
  5. ^ "1975 BMW Type 114 1502 Specs". www.ultimatespecs.com. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  6. ^ "1961 BMW New Class 1500 Specs". www.ultimatespecs.com. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  7. ^ "1981 BMW E21 3 Series 315 Specs". www.ultimatespecs.com. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  8. ^ "BMW M99 Automobilmotor". BMW Group Archiv (in German). Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  9. ^ "1962 BMW 1800 specifications, information, data, photos". www.carfolio.com. Retrieved 24 January 2017.
  10. ^ "3 Series – E30". BMW History. Retrieved 2012-11-07.