Barnhart, Missouri

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Barnhart, Missouri
CDP
Location of Barnhart, Missouri
Location of Barnhart, Missouri
Coordinates: 38°20′16″N 90°24′14″W / 38.33778°N 90.40389°W / 38.33778; -90.40389Coordinates: 38°20′16″N 90°24′14″W / 38.33778°N 90.40389°W / 38.33778; -90.40389
Country United States
State Missouri
County Jefferson
Area[1]
 • Total 5.25 sq mi (13.60 km2)
 • Land 5.09 sq mi (13.18 km2)
 • Water 0.16 sq mi (0.41 km2)
Elevation 435 ft (133 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 5,682
 • Density 1,116.3/sq mi (431.0/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 63012
Area code(s) 636
FIPS code 29-03394[3]
GNIS feature ID 0713687[4]

Barnhart is a census-designated place (CDP) in Jefferson County, Missouri, United States. The population was 5,682 at the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

Barnhart is located at 38°20′16″N 90°24′14″W / 38.33778°N 90.40389°W / 38.33778; -90.40389 (38.337914, -90.403822).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.25 square miles (13.60 km2), of which, 5.09 square miles (13.18 km2) of it is land and 0.16 square miles (0.41 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 5,682 people, 1,920 households, and 1,576 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,116.3 inhabitants per square mile (431.0/km2). There were 2,003 housing units at an average density of 393.5 per square mile (151.9/km2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.4% White, 0.5% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.3% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.1% of the population.

There were 1,920 households of which 44.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.3% were married couples living together, 10.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 17.9% were non-families. 12.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.93 and the average family size was 3.17.

The median age in the CDP was 34.5 years. 27.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.8% were from 25 to 44; 28.5% were from 45 to 64; and 6.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the CDP was 50.4% male and 49.6% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 6,108 people, 1,962 households, and 1,663 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,188.5 people per square mile (458.8/km²). There were 1,999 housing units at an average density of 389.0 per square mile (150.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.82% White, 0.36% African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.38% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.34% from other races, and 0.95% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.47% of the population.

There were 1,962 households out of which 48.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.8% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 15.2% were non-families. 11.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.08 and the average family size was 3.31.

In the CDP, the population was spread out with 30.9% under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 34.4% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 5.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 103.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.0 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $56,559, and the median income for a family was $59,189. Males had a median income of $41,758 versus $28,630 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $20,940. About 0.9% of families and 2.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those under age 18 and 6.5% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

Two miles south of Imperial on "El Camino Real" is Barnhart, Missouri. Many early settlers with names such as Moss, Stites, and Harris lived in this locale, but the town was not named until after the Frisco Railroad was completed in the early 1900s. It is said that because Mrs. C. L. Barnhart donated some land for the Frisco Railroad Depot, the town was named for the Barnhart family.

However, the land surrounding Barnhart had originally belonged to the O'Fallons. In 1834 Major Benjamin O'Fallon, nephew of Governor William Clark, settled here with his family. Major O'Fallon, who had lived with the Indians for many years, was later appointed Indian agent for the entire Northwest Region, a post he held for about 30 years. "O'Fallon's Bluff" on the Platte River was named for him.

Major B. O'Fallon died in 1842 leaving two sons, Colonel John and James O'Fallon. While James did not leave much history except that he was a farmer and stock raiser, his brother, John, made history as the largest taxpayer of Jefferson County, owning 20,000 acres in 1875, 3,000 at "Indian Retreat" near Sulphur Springs where he made his home.

The "James O'Fallon Home" built in 1860 still stands on Marriott Lane. The house is a two-story, 13-room brick structure with numerous gables and four dormer windows. It was purchased in 1884 by Joseph G. Marriott, and after that date was known as the Marriott Homestead. The home is often referred to as the Parkton Mansion by current residents. Marriott owned 632 acres of land on this site and as a cattle raiser is remembered for introducing the first Holstein cattle in Jefferson County. (Cited from http://www.jeffersoncountyonline.org/history/barnhart_ofallon.shtml)

Education[edit]

Most of the Barnhart CDP is in the Windsor C-1 School District, while a portion of the CDP is in the Fox C-6 School District.[6] A southwestern portion of the wider Barnhart area is assigned to the Dunklin R-V School District.[7]

The Windsor district previously ended at the eighth grade. High school students would attend Crystal City High School or Herculaneum High School.[8] The Fox district was originally a K-8 school district, with high school students also having a choice of Crystal City High and Herculaneum High. The Fox district became K-12 when Fox High School was established in 1955.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 24, 2012. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP (2010 CENSUS): Jefferson County, MO" (Archived 2014-06-13 at WebCite). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on June 13, 2014.
  7. ^ "Welcome to Dunklin R-V “Home of the Herculaneum Blackcats”" (Archived 2014-06-15 at WebCite). Dunklin R-V School District. Retrieved on June 16, 2014.
  8. ^ "Welcome to Windsor" (Archived 2014-06-15 at WebCite). Windsor C-1 School District. Retrieved on June 15, 2014.
  9. ^ "History of the District" (Archived 2014-06-12 at WebCite). Fox C-6 School District. Retrieved on June 13, 2014.