blackVPN

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BlackVPN (stylized as blackVPN) is a virtual private network service offered by the Hong Kong-based company BlackVPN Limited.[1]

TorrentFreak has interviewed blackVPN in their annual comparison of VPN providers since 2011.[2][3][4][5][6][7]

In 2014, blackVPN announced that they would begin to indefinitely donate 10 percent of every VPN Privacy Package purchase directly to the Electronic Frontier Foundation in support of The Day We Fight Back protest.[8]

Features[edit]

BlackVPN features AES-256 encryption and DNS leak protection.[9] The service offers apps or manual configurations for Windows, Mac, iOS, Android, Linux, and routers.[10]

The company maintains a strict no-logging policy.[11]

Blackmail incident[edit]

In April 2016, blackVPN claimed to have received blackmail from the Armada Collective hacker group.[12] According to blackVPN, the group threatened to perform a DDoS attack against their VPN servers on April 25 if the ransom of 10.08 bitcoins was not paid.[12] blackVPN also stated that two other VPN service providers had received the same e-mail on April 18 and that VPN service provider AirVPN had suffered a similar threat and attack on May 30.[12] At that time, it was unclear whether the sender of the e-mails simply imitated the group or indeed was Armada Collective.[13] On April 25, DDoS mitigation provider Cloudflare called out the threats as fake,[14] stating that not a single attack was launched against a threatened organization.[15]

Reception[edit]

In March 2016, the Dutch computer magazine Computer!Totaal (C!T) listed blackVPN as one of the nine best VPN services available. However, C!T noted the service's relatively high price and lack of own client as potential downsides.[16]

In June 2016, That One Privacy Site published a mixed review of blackVPN, commending it for its technical features and support team while criticizing their affiliate program and policies on port blocking for SMTP as problematic.[17] It was also noted that the pricing was "on the higher side."[17] The review led blackVPN to end their affiliate program and clarify a number of their policies.[17] The owner of That One Privacy Site commended blackVPN for doing so and updated the review accordingly.[17]

In July 2017, Engadget author Violet Blue mentioned blackVPN as one of the "names that come up as trusted" in the VPN service industry.[18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About - blackVPN". About BlackVPN. Archived from the original on 2017-12-31. BlackVPN Limited is registered in Hong Kong.
  2. ^ Enigmax (2011-10-07). "Which Are The Best Anonymous VPN Providers?". TorrentFreak. Archived from the original on 2011-10-08.
  3. ^ Enigmax; Ernesto (2013). "Review: Is Your VPN Service Really Anonymous?". TorrentFreak. Archived from the original on 2014-01-06.
  4. ^ Ernesto (2014-03-15). "What Are The Best Anonymous VPN Services?". TorrentFreak. Archived from the original on 2014-03-15.
  5. ^ Ernesto (2015-02-28). "Which VPN Services Take Your Anonymity Seriously? 2015 Edition". TorrentFreak. Archived from the original on 2015-03-02.
  6. ^ Ernesto (2016-02-20). "Which VPN Services Take Your Anonymity Seriously?". TorrentFreak. Archived from the original on 2016-02-20.
  7. ^ Ernesto (2017-03-04). "Which VPN Services Keep You Anonymous in 2017?". TorrentFreak. Archived from the original on 2017-03-04.
  8. ^ "BlackVPN Joins the Protest Against Mass Surveillance; BlackVPN to Donate 10% of Every VPN Privacy Package Purchase to the EFF to Help in the Fight for Digital Rights<!lang>" (Press release) (in {$lang}</!lang>). Cision. 2014-02-11. Archived from the original on 2016-12-27.
  9. ^ "That One Privacy Site | BlackVPN Review". thatoneprivacysite.net. Retrieved 2018-05-17.
  10. ^ "About – blackVPN". www.blackvpn.com. Retrieved 2018-05-17.
  11. ^ "BlackVPN Reviews ⋆ TorrentFreak". TorrentFreak. Retrieved 2018-05-17.
  12. ^ a b c blackVPN (2016-04-24). "Blackmailed: DDoS Attack Against BlackVPN Could Start On Monday 25th of April". Medium. Archived from the original on 2018-01-01.
  13. ^ Keane, Jonathan (2016-04-25). "A hacker group is threatening VPN providers with DDOS attacks". Digital Trends. Archived from the original on 2018-01-01. It’s unclear if the people threatening BlackVPN are the same group or just copycats. As with Anonymous, it’s almost impossible to verify when someone claims to be speaking on behalf of the group. A report in December even pointed out how these hacker groups are regularly imitated.
  14. ^ Keane, Jonathan (2016-05-02). "Armada Collective DDoS threats were fake, but still scored thousands of dollars". Digital Trends. Archived from the original on 2016-05-06.
  15. ^ Prince, Matthew (2016-04-25). "Empty DDoS Threats: Meet the Armada Collective". Blog. Cloudflare. Archived from the original on 2018-01-01.
  16. ^ Ossewaarde, Vincent (2016-03-14). "De 9 beste VPN-providers getest". Computer!Totaal (in Dutch). Archived from the original on 2018-01-01.
  17. ^ a b c d "That One Privacy Site / BlackVPN Review". 2016-06-13. Archived from the original on 2017-12-31.
  18. ^ Blue, Violet (2017-07-04). "Good luck finding a safe VPN". Engadget. Archived from the original on 2017-12-30. So if a VPN is recommended somewhere, do a little homework before you fork over your data (and your cash). Names that come up as trusted include Perfect Privacy, Freedome, TorGuard, Tunnelbear, Black VPN and others.

External links[edit]