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Calanthe sylvatica Calanthe masuka OrchidsBln0906b.JPG
Calanthe sylvatica
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Orchidaceae
Subfamily: Epidendroideae
Tribe: Collabieae
Alliance: Calanthe
Genus: Calanthe
  • Alismorkis Thouars
  • Amblyglottis Blume
  • Aulostylis Schltr.
  • Calanthidum Pfitzer
  • Centrosia A.Rich.
  • Centrosis Thouars
  • Ghiesbreghtia A.Rich. & Galeotti
  • Limatodes Blume
  • Paracalanthe Kudô
  • Preptanthe Rchb.f.
  • Styloglossum Breda
  • Zeduba Ham. ex Meisn
  • Zoduba Buch.-Ham. ex D.Don

Calanthe – commonly abbreviated Cal. in horticulture – is a widespread genus of terrestrial orchids (family Orchidaceae) with some 200 species.[2]

The genus is divided into two groups – deciduous species and evergreen ones. Calanthe species are found in all tropical areas, but mostly concentrated in Southeast Asia; some species also range into subtropical and tropical lands such as China, India, Madagascar, Australia, Mexico, Central America, the West Indies and various islands of the Pacific and Indian Oceans.[1] C. discolor is a well-known species found in Japan, the southern part of Korea and China; its vernacular name in Japanese, ebine, (海老根) means "shrimp-root" in reference to the shape of the plant's pseudobulbs and root system.[3]

Selected species[edit]



  1. ^ a b "Calanthe R.Br., Bot. Reg. 7: t. 573 (1821), nom. cons.". World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 2015-09-04. 
  2. ^ La Croix, I. F. (2008). The New Encyclopedia of Orchids: 1500 Species in Cultivation. Timber Press. p. 78. ISBN 978-0-88192-876-1. 
  3. ^ Sasaki, Sanmi (2005). Chado the Way of Tea: A Japanese Tea Master's Almanac. Translated by Shaun McCabe and Iwasaki Satoko. Tuttle. pp. 195–196. ISBN 978-0-8048-3716-3. 

External links[edit]

  • Media related to Calanthe at Wikimedia Commons
  • Data related to Calanthe at Wikispecies