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California State Route 195

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State Route 195 marker

State Route 195
The 1972 routing of SR 195 highlighted in red
Route information
Defined by Streets and Highways Code § 495
Maintained by Caltrans
Length: 7.420 mi[2] (11.941 km)
Existed: 1963[1] – 2014[3]
Major junctions
West end: Harrison Street near Oasis
East end: SR 111 in Mecca
Location
Counties: Riverside
Highway system
SR 193 SR 197

State Route 195 (SR 195) was a state highway in the U.S. state of California, branching westward from SR 111 to SR 86 near the town of Mecca and the Salton Sea. The route formerly extended east to Interstate 10 (I-10) near Joshua Tree National Park as a longer route extending to Blythe and points further east. After the main route was shifted north, the older route remained as an alternate known as Box Canyon Road. The route was designated in the 1964 state highway renumbering, although the Box Canyon Road portion was removed as a state highway in 1972. Following the construction of the SR 86 expressway, SR 195 was curtailed in 2009, and removed entirely in 2014.

Route description[edit]

Before the route was mostly removed in 2009, it began at Harrison Street, the old routing of SR 86, in Riverside County. It then headed north as Pierce Street until intersecting 66th Street, where SR 195 turned east. The highway intersected SR 86 and continued to the town of Mecca, where it met its north end at SR 111. The route loosely paralleled the northern end of the Salton Sea, passing through farmland for its entire length.[4][5]

In 2013, SR 195 had an annual average daily traffic (AADT) of 4,500 vehicles at Buchanan Street, and 6,000 vehicles at the eastern terminus with SR 111, the latter of which was the highest AADT for the highway.[6]

History[edit]

Route 64, a highway from Mecca to Blythe, was added to the state highway system in 1919.[7] In 1935, Pierce Street from Route 26 near Oasis to Avenue 66, and Avenue 66 from Route 26 to Mecca were added to the state highway system.[8] Two years later, Pierce Street was designated as Route 203, and Avenue 66 was designated as Route 204.[9] By 1926, the road existed east of Mecca to Blythe, but was unpaved;[10] by 1930, the road connected from Mecca to the road along the western side of the Salton Sea to Indio and points further west.[11]

Between 1932 and 1934, the road east of Mecca had been paved.[12][13] The western part of the road, known as the Box Canyon road, from Mecca to Blythe served as part of US 60 and US 70 until it was eventually bypassed in favor of a more direct route to Indio, diverging at Shavers' Summit. Between 1934 and 1936, US 60 and US 70 had made the shift north towards Indio, and the portion between US 99 and Mecca was paved. Initial opposition was later overcome after the road was washed out during a storm and forced motorists to take refuge in the nearby foothills.[13][14][15] By 1940, the SR 195 designation was signed.[16] In the 1940s, the highway continued due west of Mecca to end at an intersection with US 99, rather than turning south.[17]

In 1953, efforts to remove the road from Mecca to the highway from Blythe to Indio, from the state highway system were met with community opposition, since it served as an alternate route for the other highway.[18] State Senator Nelson Dilworth proposed legislation to require the road from Banning through Idyllwild to Mountain Center to be added to the state highway system if SR 195 was removed, as the two were of roughly the same length, but the latter remained in the system.[19]

SR 195 was officially designated in the 1964 state highway renumbering.[1] The original alignment continued past SR 111 and the Salton Sea before ending at US 60, which later became I-10, at the southern end of Joshua Tree National Park.[20][21] The Division of Highways proposed deleting this part of the state highway in 1971,[22] though similar plans had been revived in 1969.[19] This portion was removed in 1972.[23]

In 1988, the California Transportation Commission (CTC) approved shifting SR 111 onto the new SR 86 expressway after it was completed, using SR 195 to make the connection.[3] When the SR 86 expressway was fully constructed, SR 195 was to be removed from the state highway system according to state law;[23] that expressway was finished in 2001. However, this removed the connection from the highway portion of SR 111 to the new expressway carrying both SR 111 and SR 86 north from the state highway system. Caltrans officially deleted most of SR 195 in 2009, leaving a gap in SR 111 following deletions of the old routing that was now bypassed by the expressway. In December 2014, with Riverside County and Caltrans both supporting, the CTC transferred the remaining portion of SR 195, from the new SR 86 expressway to SR 111, to become part of SR 111.[3] SR 195 still appears in Caltrans documents dated from 2014.[2][24]

Major intersections[edit]

Except where prefixed with a letter, postmiles were measured on the road as it was when the route was established, based on the 1972 routing, and do not necessarily reflect current mileage. R reflects a realignment in the route since then, M indicates a second realignment, L refers an overlap due to a correction or change, and T indicates postmiles classified as temporary (for a full list of prefixes, see the list of postmile definitions).[2] Segments that remain unconstructed or have been relinquished to local control may be omitted. The entire route was in Riverside County.

Location Postmile
[2][6][24]
Destinations Notes
R0.00 Harrison Street South end of SR 195; former US 99; former SR 86
SR 86
Mecca 7.42 SR 111 North end of SR 195
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b California State Assembly. "An act to add Section 253 and Article 3 (commencing with Section 300) to Chapter 2 of Division 1 of, and to repeal Section 253 and Article 3 (commencing with Section 300) of Chapter 2 of Division 1 of, the...". 1963 Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 385 p. 1182. 
  2. ^ a b c d California Department of Transportation. "State Truck Route List". Sacramento: California Department of Transportation. Archived from the original (XLS file) on June 30, 2015. Retrieved June 30, 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c Craggs, Timothy (December 10, 2014). "Route Adoption – State Highway, 08-RIV-111 PM R18.5/R19.4 Resolution HRA-14-02" (PDF). Retrieved June 20, 2015. 
    "Minutes" (PDF). California Transportation Commission. December 10, 2014. Retrieved June 20, 2015. 
  4. ^ Riverside County Street Atlas (Map). Thomas Brothers. 2009. 
  5. ^ Google (January 2, 2011). "California State Route 195" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 2, 2011. 
  6. ^ a b California Department of Transportation (2013). "All Traffic Volumes on CSHS". Sacramento: California Department of Transportation. 
  7. ^ California State Assembly. "Senate Constitutional Amendment No. 27—Resolution to propose to the people of the State of California an amendment to the constitution of said state, by adding to article sixteen thereof a new section to be numbered two, providing for the...". Forty-third Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California (Resolution). State of California. Ch. 46. 
  8. ^ California State Assembly. "An act to add section 641 to, and to amend section 493 of, the Streets and Highways Code, relating to State highways". Fifty-first Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 429. 
  9. ^ California State Assembly. "An act to amend sections 251, 308, 340, 344, 351, 352, 361, 368, 369, 374, 377, 404 and 425 of, to add four two sections to be numbered 503, 504, 505 and 506 to, and to repeal sections 603, 611...". Fifty-second Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 841. 
  10. ^ California Division of Highways (1926). Road Map of the State of California (Map). [1:1,341,120]. Sacramento: California Division of Highways. Retrieved June 20, 2015. 
  11. ^ California Division of Highways (1930). Road Map of the State of California (Map). [1:1,463,040]. Sacramento: California Division of Highways. Retrieved June 20, 2015. 
  12. ^ California Division of Highways (1932). Road Map of the State of California (Map). [1:1,463,040]. Sacramento: California Division of Highways. Retrieved June 20, 2015. 
  13. ^ a b California Division of Highways (1934). Road Map of the State of California (Map). [1:1,463,040]. Sacramento: California Division of Highways. OCLC 26955146. Retrieved June 20, 2015. 
  14. ^ California Division of Highways (1936–1937). Road Map of the State of California (Map). [1:1,463,040]. Sacramento: California Division of Highways. OCLC 26939810. Retrieved June 20, 2015. 
  15. ^ Belden, L. Burr (December 23, 1962). "Cloudburst Brought Major Road Change". The San Bernardino County Sun. p. 44. Retrieved June 20, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  16. ^ California Division of Highways (1940). Road Map of the State of California (Map). [1:1,463,040]. Sacramento: California Division of Highways. Retrieved June 20, 2015. 
  17. ^ Santa Ana (Map). 1:250,000. United States Geological Survey. 1947. 
  18. ^ "Box Canyon Road Bill Protested". Los Angeles Times. February 4, 1953. p. A2. 
  19. ^ a b "Road in San Jacinto Mts. May Become State Highway". San Bernardino County Sun. July 13, 1969. p. 18. Retrieved June 20, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  20. ^ California Division of Highways (1965). Road Map of the State of California (Map). [1:1,411,705]. Sacramento: California Division of Highways. OCLC 381149522. 
  21. ^ California Division of Highways (1969). State Highway Map: California (Map). [1:1,341,120]. Sacramento: California Division of Highways. 
  22. ^ Long, Ken (September 17, 1971). "State Officials Unveil Their Proposal For Classifying Roads By Function". San Bernardino County Sun. p. 16. Retrieved June 20, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  23. ^ a b California State Assembly. "An act to amend Sections 263.3, 263.8, and 415 of, and to add Section 486 to, the Streets and Highways Code, relating to state highways". 1972 Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 1216 p. 2351. 
  24. ^ a b California Department of Transportation (July 2007). "Log of Bridges on State Highways". Sacramento: California Department of Transportation. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google

KML is from Wikidata