Carnegie Prize

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Carnegie Gold Medal of Honor (1896)

The Carnegie Prize is an international art prize awarded by the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It currently consists of a $10,000 cash prize accompanied by a gold medal.

History[edit]

The Carnegie Prize was established in 1896, to recognize the best painting shown in the first annual exhibition of the Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute. Unlike most American annual exhibitions, which were limited to artists born or resident in the United States, the Carnegie exhibitions were international.[1] To attract top painters from home and abroad, the Carnegie exhibitions offered high cash prizes—$1,500 for the First Class winner, $1,000 for the Second-Class winner and $500 for the Third-Class winner. The First-Class winner's cash prize was accompanied by the Carnegie Gold Medal of Honor (1896), designed by Tiffany & Co. and cast by J.E. Caldwell & Co. Often, especially in the early years, the prize-winning painting was purchased for the museum's permanent collection.[1]

The exhibition has undergone a series of name changes and transformations—adding a gold medal for sculpture (beginning in 1958),[2] and going from a schedule of every year to every second or third year, and now, to every fourth or fifth year. The exhibitions in the late 1970s were retrospectives of established artists. In 1982, the exhibition was renamed the Carnegie International, and returned to its original mission of showing recent works by a host of artists. In 1985, the Carnegie Prize was refocused to recognize not just a single work of art but an honoree's entire body of work.[1] In the 1990s, the exhibition expanded to include non-traditional artists and filmmakers.

As of 2019, 67 Carnegie Prizes had been awarded and one was refused (Irish painter Francis Bacon, 1967).[3] The Spanish sculptor Eduardo Chillida was awarded it twice (1964 for an individual sculpture, 1979 for his body of work). American painter Cecilia Beaux was the first woman awarded the Carnegie Prize (1899); German sculptor Rebecca Horn was the second woman (1988). South African artist William Kentridge was the first filmmaker awarded it (1999). Documenta, the German contemporary art exhibition, was the only organization awarded the prize (1979). English artist Lynette Yiadom-Boakye was the first woman of color awarded the prize (2018).

The Carnegie International's prize should not be confused with the Carnegie Prize of the National Academy of Design, the Carnegie Prize of the Society of American Artists, the Carnegie Art Award (Sweden), or with the Carnegie Medal in Literature.

List of Gold Medal winners[edit]

Year Artist Image Work Collection Notes
Annual Exhibition at the Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute[4]
$1,500 cash award accompanied the gold medal

1896
1st
John Lavery
 Ireland
Lavery Lady in Brown Carnegie Catalogue 1896 plate 23.jpg Lady in Brown[4]
1897
2nd
James Jebusa Shannon
 United States
Shannon Kitty c.1897 Carnegie Art Museum.jpg Miss Kitty[5][6] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
The artist's daughter and two dogs
1898
3rd
Dwight William Tryon
 United States
Tryon Early Spring in New England 1897 Smithsonian.jpg Early Spring in New England[7] Freer Gallery of Art,
Washington, D.C.
1899
4th
Cecilia Beaux
 United States
Mother and Daughter Cecilia Beaux 1898 PAFA.jpg Mother and Daughter
(Mrs. Clement Acton Griscom & Frances
Canby Griscom)
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts,
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Gold Medal: 1900 Paris Exposition
1900 Temple Gold Medal (PAFA)

First woman awarded a Carnegie Prize. (The next was not
until 1988.)
1900
5th
André Dauchez
 France
Dauchez KelpGatherers 1900catalogue no.52.jpg The Kelp Gatherers
1901
6th
Alfred H. Maurer
 United States
Arrangement.jpg An Arrangement Whitney Museum of American Art,
Manhattan, New York City
1902
7th
Exhibition of loaned works.[4]
No prizes awarded.
1903
8th
Frank Weston Benson
 United States
A Woman Reading[8] Beverly Arts Association,
Chicago, Illinois
1904
9th
Walter Elmer Schofield
 United States
Schofield Across the River 1904 Carnegie Exhibition Catalogue.jpg Across the River[9][10] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1905
10th
Lucien Simon
 France
Lucien Simon, 1904 - Soirée à l'Atelier.jpg Evening in a Studio Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts,
Stanford University,
Stanford, California
1906 No annual exhibition
(due to museum expansion)[4]
1907
11th
Gaston La Touche
 France
La Touche The Bath 1907.jpg The Bath[4] Ex collection: William S. Stimmel[11]
Ex collection: University Club of Pittsburgh
Sold at Dargate Auction Galleries, Pittsburgh, 7 October 2017.[12]
1908
12th
Thomas W. Dewing
 United States
The Necklace SAAM-1929.6.40 2.jpg The Necklace[4] Smithsonian American Art Museum,
Washington, D.C.
1909
13th
Edmund C. Tarbell
 United States
Edmund Tarbell, 1904 - A Girl Crocheting.jpg A Girl Crocheting[13] Arkell Museum,
Canajoharie, New York
1910
14th
William Orpen
 Ireland
Portrait of the Artist by William Orpen. Figure in front with nude statue of a woman in the rear. LCCN2014688147.jpg Portrait of the Artist (Venus and Myself)[14] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1911
15th
John White Alexander
 United States
John-White-Alexander-Art-A-Ray-of-Sunlight-1898.jpg A Ray of Sunlight (The Cellist) private collection
1912
16th
Charles Sims
 England
SimsCharles Pastorella InternationalStudio June1912.jpg Pastorella[15] Ex collection: William S. Stimmel[11]
1913
17th
Glyn Warren Philpot
 England
Philpot MarbleWorker InternationalStudio June1913.jpg The Marble Worker[16] Muskegon Museum of Art,
Muskegon, Michigan
1914
18th
Edward Redfield
 United States
The Village in Winter[17][18] Payne Gallery,
Moravian College,
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
Ex collection: William S. Stimmel[11]
1915–1919 No annual exhibitions (due to World War I)[4]
International Exhibition of Paintings, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh[19]
Name change

1920
19th
Abbot Henderson Thayer
 United States
Thayer Young Woman in Olive Plush 1920 Carnegie Catalogue.jpg Young Woman in Olive Plush
(Woman in Green Velvet)[20]
Addison Gallery of American Art,
Phillips Academy,
Andover, Massachusetts
1921
20th
Ernest Lawson
 United States
Vanishing Mist[21][22] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1922
21st
George W. Bellows
 United States
Bellows Eleanor Int.Studio June1922 p.208.jpg Elinor, Jean and Anna[23] Albright-Knox Art Gallery,
Buffalo, New York
The artist's aunt, daughter and mother
1921 Beck Gold Medal (PAFA)
1923
22nd
Arthur Bowen Davies
 United States
Afterthoughts of Earth[24]
1924
23rd
Augustus John
 Wales
Madame Suggia[25] Tate Britain,
London, UK
1925
24th
Henri Le Sidaner
 France (born Mauritius)
Window on the Bay of Villefranche[26] Huntington Museum of Art,
Huntington, West Virginia
1926
25th
Ker-Xavier Roussel
 France
The Garden (The Garden Window)[27] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1927
26th
Henri Matisse
 France
Still Life: Bouquet and Compotier[28] Virginia Museum of Fine Arts,
Richmond, Virginia
1928
27th
André Derain
 France
Still Life[29] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1929
28th
Felice Carena
 Italy
La Scuola[30] Banca Monte dei Paschi Collection,
Siena, Italy
1930
29th
Pablo Picasso
 Spain
Portrait of Mme Picasso[4] private collection
1931
30th
Franklin C. Watkins
 United States
Suicide in Costume[31] Philadelphia Museum of Art Depicts a dead man in clown costume holding a smoking gun.
1932 No annual exhibition (due to severity of the
Great Depression)
Cash award reduced to $1,000
1933
31st
André Dunoyer de Segonzac
 France
Saint-Tropez
1934
32nd
Peter Blume
 United States (born Russia)
South of Scranton[32] Metropolitan Museum of Art
1935
33rd
Hipólito Hidalgo de Caviedes y Gómez
 Spain
Elvira and Tiberio[33] Ex collection: Fine Arts Society of San Diego[33]
Auctioned at Sotheby's NY, 18-19 November 1987[33]
1936
34th
Leon Kroll
 United States
The Road from the Cove[34] private collection
1937
35th
Georges Braque
 France
The Yellow Cloth (The Yellow Tablecloth)[4] private collection
1938
36th
Karl Hofer
 Germany
The Wind[35] Detroit Institute of Arts,
Detroit, Michigan
1939
37th
Alexander Brook
 United States
Georgia Jungle[36][37] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1940–1949 No annual exhibitions (due to World War II).
Instead, 9 exhibitions of American paintings.[4]
Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Painting Exhibition reorganized as a biennial
Cash award increased to $2,000

1950
38th
Jacques Villon
 France
The Thresher Villon was a Cubist painter, and the brother of Marcel Duchamp.
1951 No exhibition
1952
39th
Ben Nicholson
 England[4]
Azure[38] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1953 & 1954 No exhibitions Exhibition reorganized as a triennial.[4]
1955
40th
Alfred Manessier
 France
Crown of Thorns[39] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1956 & 1957 No exhibitions
Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Painting and Sculpture[2]
Gold Medal for Sculpture added

1958
41st
Painting
Antoni Tàpies
 Spain
Painting[40] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1958
41st
Sculpture
Alexander Calder
 United States
Pittsburghmobile.jpg Mobile: Pittsburgh[41] Pittsburgh International Airport
1959 & 1960 No exhibitions
1961
42nd
Painting
Mark Tobey
 United States
Untitled[42] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1961
42nd
Sculpture
Alberto Giacometti
  Switzerland
Walking Man 1[43] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1962 & 1963 No exhibitions
Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Art "The traditional award structure of numbered prizes has been
eliminated in favor of equal awards, four for painting and two
for sculpture, each in the amount of $2,000."[44]
1964
43rd
Painting
Ellsworth Kelly
 United States
Blue, Black and Red
Victor Pasmore
 England
Red Abstract No. 5[45] Bristol Museum & Art Gallery,
Bristol, England.
Antonio Saura
 Spain
Imaginary Portrait of Goya[46] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Pierre Soulages
 France
24 November '63[47] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Meditation on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy
1964
43rd
Sculpture
Jean Arp
 Germany
Sculpture Classique[48] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Eduardo Chillida[49]
 Spain
Modulation d'espace II[50] Lehmbruck Museum,
Duisburg, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
1965 & 1966 No exhibitions
1967
44th
Painting
Francis Bacon
 Ireland
Bacon refused the prize.[3]
Josef Albers
 United States (born Germany)
Homage to the Square: Vernal[51] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Joan Miró
 Spain
Queen Louise of Prussia[52] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1967
44th
Sculpture
Victor Vasarely
 France (born Hungary)
Alom[53] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1968 & 1969 No exhibitions
1970
45th
No prizes awarded
1971–1976 No exhibitions (due to construction of the
Sarah Mellon Scaife Gallery).[4]
Pittsburgh International Series Exhibition reorganized as a biennial retrospective of a single
artist's body of work.
$50,000 Andrew W. Mellon Prize awarded to honoree.[54]
1977
46th
Pierre Alechinsky
 Belgium
1978 No exhibition
1979
47th
Willem de Kooning
 United States (born Netherlands)
$50,000 Andrew W. Mellon Prize split among 3 honorees
Eduardo Chillida[49]
 Spain
Documenta II (1959), IV (1968) and VI (1977)
 Germany
International contemporary art exhibition held in Germany
1980 & 1981 No exhibitions
Carnegie International Exhibition Exhibition re-established as a triennial
$10,000 Carnegie International Prize

1982
48th
No prizes awarded
1983 & 1984 No exhibitions
1985
49th
Painting
Anselm Kiefer
 Germany
Midgard[55] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1985
49th
Sculpture
Richard Serra
 United States
Carnegie Museum of Art Pittsburgh.jpg Carnegie[56] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1986 & 1987 No exhibitions
1988
50th
Rebecca Horn
 Germany
The Hydra Forest: Performing Oscar Wilde[57] San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Assemblage of electrical devices, glass, coal and other objects

Second woman awarded a Carnegie Prize.
1989 & 1990 No exhibitions
1991
51st
On Kawara
 Japan
Date Paintings[58] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1992–1994 No exhibitions
1995
52nd
Painting
Sigmar Polke
 Germany
Hermes Trismegistos I-IV[59] De Pont Museum of Contemporary Art,
Tilburg, North Brabant, Netherlands
1995
52nd
Sculpture
Richard Artschwager
 United States
Table Prepared in the Presence of Enemies[60] Carnegie Art Museum,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1996–1998 No exhibitions
1999/2000
53rd
William Kentridge
 South Africa
Film: Stereoscope First filmmaker awarded a Carnegie Prize.
2001–2003 No exhibitions
2004/2005
54th
Kutlug Ataman
 Turkey
40-channel video installation: Kuba[61] Interviews with residents of Kuba, a shanty town in Istanbul.
2006 & 2007 No exhibitions
2008
55th
"Life on Mars"
Vija Celmins
 United States (born Latvia)
Night Sky #12[62] Carnegie Museum of Art,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Third woman awarded a Carnegie Prize.
2009–2012 No exhibitions
2013
56th
Nicole Eisenman[63]
 France
Figure paintings and sculpture Fourth woman awarded a Carnegie Prize.
2014–2017 No exhibitions
2018
57th
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye
 England
Figure paintings and portraits Fifth woman awarded a Carnegie Prize.
First woman of color awarded a Carnegie Prize.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "A History of the Carnegie International, 1896–2008". Carnegie Museum of Art. Retrieved 29 December 2018.
  2. ^ a b The 1958 Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Painting and Sculpture, from Amazon.
  3. ^ a b Matthew Gale & Chris Stephens, Francis Bacon (Rizzoli International Publishing, 2009), p. 263.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Donald Miller (8 October 2004). "Carnegie International Timeline". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 23 January 2015.
  5. ^ Miss Kitty, from CMoA
  6. ^ Miss Kitty, from SIRIS.
  7. ^ Early Spring in New England, from SIRIS.
  8. ^ A Woman Reading, from SIRIS.
  9. ^ Across the River, from CMoA.
  10. ^ Across the River, from SIRIS.
  11. ^ a b c Will J. Hyett, "Some Collections of Paintings in Pittsburgh," Art and Archaeology, vol. 14, nos. 5-6 (November/December 1922), p. 328.
  12. ^ The Bath, from LiveAuctioneers.
  13. ^ A Girl Crocheting, from SIRIS.
  14. ^ Venus and Myself, from CMoA.
  15. ^ "The International studio". New York, John Lane Co. [etc.] 4 January 1897 – via Internet Archive.
  16. ^ "The International studio". New York, John Lane Co. [etc.] 4 January 1897 – via Internet Archive.
  17. ^ The Village in Winter, from SIRIS.
  18. ^ Village in Winter, from The Athenaeum.
  19. ^ "The Pittsburgh international exhibition of contemporary painting and sculpture. 1920 (19th)". HathiTrust.
  20. ^ Woman in Green Velvet, from SIRIS.
  21. ^ Vanishing Mist, from CMoA.
  22. ^ Vanishing Mist, from SIRIS.
  23. ^ Elinor, Jean and Anna, from SIRIS.
  24. ^ Afterthoughts of Earth, from SIRIS.
  25. ^ Madame Suggia, from Tate Britain.
  26. ^ Window on the Bay of Villefranche, from Google Arts & Culture.
  27. ^ The Garden, from CMoA.
  28. ^ Still Life: Bouquet and Compotier, from VMFA.
  29. ^ Still Life, from CMoA.
  30. ^ La Scuola, from Artribune.
  31. ^ Suicide in Costume, from PMA.
  32. ^ South of Scranton, from MMA.
  33. ^ a b c Elvira and Tiberio, from San Diego State University.
  34. ^ Road from the Cove, from SIRIS.
  35. ^ The Wind, from DIA.
  36. ^ Georgia Jungle, from CMoA.
  37. ^ Georgia Jungle, from SIRIS.
  38. ^ Azure, from CMoA.
  39. ^ Crown of Thorns, from CMoA.
  40. ^ Painting, from CMoA.
  41. ^ Pittsburgh (sculpture), from SIRIS.
  42. ^ Untitled, from CMoA.
  43. ^ Walking Man 1, from CMoA.
  44. ^ Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Art (Carnegie Institute, Dept. of Fine Arts, 1964), p. 16.
  45. ^ Red Abstract No. 5, from Art UK.
  46. ^ Imaginary Portrait of Goya, from CMoA.
  47. ^ 24 November '63, from CMoA.
  48. ^ Sculpture Classique, from CMoA.
  49. ^ a b Ken Johnson, "Eduardo Chillida, Sculptor on a Grand Scale, Dies at 78," The New York Times, 22 August 2002.
  50. ^ Modulation d'espace, (PDF) from Lehmbruck Museum.
  51. ^ Homage to the Square: Vernal, from CMoA.
  52. ^ Queen Louise of Prussia, from CMoA.
  53. ^ Alom, from CMoA.
  54. ^ Nicole F. Scalissi, "Art of the People: Pierre Alechinsky and the CoBrA Movement," from CMoA.
  55. ^ Midgard, from CMoA.
  56. ^ Carnegie, from CMoA.
  57. ^ The Hydra Forest: Performing Oscar Wilde, from SFMOMA.
  58. ^ Date Paintings, from CMoA.
  59. ^ Hermes Trismegistos I-IV, from De Pont Museum.
  60. ^ Table Prepared in the Presence of Enemies, from CMoA.
  61. ^ Oskar Czerniawski, "Kutlug Ataman's Kuba offers a window into a community," Culture24, from Arts Council England.
  62. ^ Night Sky #12, from CMoA.
  63. ^ "Artist Nicole Eisenman wins Carnegie Prize for ingenious installation at Carnegie International". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 22 Jan 2014.