Caroline Scheufele

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Caroline Scheufele
Caroline Scheufele.jpg
Born(1961-12-14)December 14, 1961
Pforzheim, Germany
NationalityGerman
Alma materInternational School of Geneva (Ecolint)
OccupationCo-President of Chopard
Parent(s)Karl and Karin Scheufele
RelativesKarl-Friedrich Scheufele

Caroline Scheufele, born December 14, 1961 in Pforzheim, Germany, is a German business woman. She is the Artistic Director and Co-President of Chopard,[1][2][3][4] the Swiss-based luxury watches and jewellery manufacturer.[5] She is the daughter of Karl and Karin Scheufele, German entrepreneurs who purchased the company in 1963.[2][6][7] During the 80s, Caroline Scheufele expanded the business into the jewelry sector.

In 1998, Caroline Scheufele redesigned the Palme d’Or for the Cannes Film Festival, and made Chopard an official event partner.[8][9][10]

As Artistic Director and Head of the Creation and Design department at Chopard, Scheufele is responsible for the High Jewellery division, for the design and creation of jewels and ladies’ watches as well as for fragrances and accessories. Scheufele is also in charge of the international retail business.[11]

Biography[edit]

Childhood[edit]

Caroline Scheufele was born on 14 December 1961 in Pforzheim in Germany. Her parents manage the watchmaking company Eszeha, based in Pforzheim.[6]

In 1963, her father Karl acquired the Geneva-based watch manufacture Chopard, and over the following years the family traveled back and forth between Germany and Switzerland.[6][2]

At the age of 12, Caroline moved to Switzerland in order to study at Geneva’s International School along with her brother Karl-Friedrich. She decided to join the family business immediately after obtaining her diploma, while being enrolled in classes in Design and Gemmology. She completed a year of further training at Eszeha, spending time in each of the company departments, including export, packaging, after-sales service, and others while continuing to work in the Design Department. Back in Geneva, she joined her brother’s office.

Launching of the jewelry side[edit]

In 1985, she designed an articulated clown made of floating diamonds.[2][6][12][13]

Her father put the piece into production.[2][6][12] The clown was the first piece of jewelry made by Chopard and marked the company’s launch into this sector.[2][6][12] From that time onward, the company developed the jewelry side of its business, later expanding into fine jewelry.[2][6][12]

The Palme d'Or[edit]

In 1997, Chopard opened a boutique in Cannes.[6] Caroline Scheufele wanted to link the boutique’s opening to the festival.[6] So she headed to Paris to meet Pierre Viot, Director of the Cannes Film Festival.[6][14] The Palme d’Or used to consist of a gold plated palm leaf resting on a Plexiglas pyramid. Its design had remained unchanged for 50 years.[15] Pierre Viot invited her to redesign the award piece[6] and she agreed. Caroline Scheufele redesigned the Palme d’Or for the Cannes Film Festival[16][15] and made Chopard the official event partner from 1998 onwards.[6][8] Since that time, the award has been manufactured within the company’s workshops.[8]

2001: Co-Presidency[edit]

In 2001, Caroline Scheufele and her brother Karl-Friedrich were named co-presidents of the company. Caroline is the artistic director in charge of fine jewelry, design and artwork, as well as perfume and accessories.[17] Her brother is in charge of watches, innovation and business strategy. They jointly manage marketing, publicity and communications.

Caroline Scheufele is also in charge of international retail and travels the world to introduce the brand to other countries.[18]

She establishes partnerships with charitable organizations such as Elton John AIDS Foundation,[6][19] The Prince’s Trust, the José Carreras Leukaemia Foundation, Petra Nemcova’s All Hands And Hearts - Smart Response, Natalia Vodianova’s Naked Heart Foundation, Sheikha Moza bint Nasser’s Education Above All, and the WWF.

In 2006, the Red Carpet Collection was created: sixty unique high jewellery pieces were launched on the occasion of the 60th Cannes Film Festival.

Ethical gold[edit]

In 2011, Caroline Scheufele met Livia Firth, wife of actor Colin Firth, who is involved in sustainable development.[4][20][21] As the founder of Green Carpet Challenge, Livia Firth encourages brands to invest in more ethical designs.[4][22][20] Following their encounter, Caroline created a collection made entirely from ethical gold certified by Fairmined[4] and diamonds from certified members of the Responsible Jewellery Council.[20] Fairmined gold is extracted from sustainable mines supported by the Alliance for Responsible Mining.[22][20][21] Since 2014, the Palme d’Or has been made in Fairmined certified ethical gold.[4][8][22][20][14]

Over time, Caroline has forged partnerships and agreements with various players operating in the responsibly extracted ethical gold market and developed the production of sustainable jewelry and watches.[22][20]

Scheufele was a guest judge on season 13 of Project Runway. The episode entitled "Priceless Runway" required the contestants to create red carpet looks inspired by Chopard jewelry.

Scheufele is a long-term resident of Gstaad.[23]

Record[edit]

In 2015, Caroline Scheufele acquired one of the world’s largest and purest raw diamonds from a mine in Botswana on behalf of Chopard.[3][10]. She used this 342-carat diamond, known as the “Queen of Kalahari”, to create a fine jewelry collection that was exhibited in Paris in 2018 and baptized “The Garden of Kalahari”.[3][24][25][10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "High Jewelry on the Runway Draws Future Buyers (Hopefully)". The New York Times. May 10, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "The story behind Rihanna's exuberant high jewellery collection for Chopard". The Telegraph. June 7, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c "Big diamonds are big business". Financial Times. March 23, 2017.
  4. ^ a b c d e "Julianne Moore: Cannes' green goddess". Financial Times. May 13, 2016.
  5. ^ D'Souza, Veyoleen (19 November 2011). "Chopard's Caroline Gruosi-Scheufele: A Creative Businesswoman". Luxpresso.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Cannes rocks: all the stars want Chopard, the most bank-busting bling on the planet". Standard.co.uk. May 16, 2013.
  7. ^ "Chopard celebrates the 25th anniversary of its icon, the Happy Sport watch". Lifetime magazine. March 5, 2018.
  8. ^ a b c d "Chopard Expands Its 20-Year Partnership With Cannes Film Festival". Forbes. May 3, 2018.
  9. ^ "A chat with Caroline Scheufele". Worldtempus.com. December 22, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c "Rock star: how Chopard turned the 342-carat Queen of Kalahari rough diamond into an entire high jewellery collection". The Telegraph. January 21, 2017.
  11. ^ "Caroline Gruosi-Scheufele, Co-President, Chopard". Financial Times.
  12. ^ a b c d "Chopard Happy Diamonds: Interview with Caroline Scheufele about the collection". Luxuo magazine. December 21, 2016.
  13. ^ "Meet The Happy Diamond Princess". Lux Magazine. Archived from the original on 2012-03-11.
  14. ^ a b "Chopard unveils 2017 Red Carpet Collection". Day and Night magazine. May 21, 2017.
  15. ^ a b "Exclusive: Chopard's Caroline Scheufele Talks Jewels and Julia Roberts". Harper's Bazaar Arabia. May 17, 2016.
  16. ^ "A brief history of the Palme d'or". Festival de Cannes.
  17. ^ "Guo Pei & Caroline Scheufele Collection Couture Automne-Hiver". Runway magazine. July 2, 2017.
  18. ^ Adler, Claire (7 October 2011). "Time² Interviews Chopard Co-President Caroline Gruosi-Scheufele". Time².
  19. ^ "White Tie and Tiara Ball". Power magazine. 2006.
  20. ^ a b c d e f "Chopard stands up for 100% ethical gold at Baselworld". Euronews.
  21. ^ a b "Chopard's ethical Happy collections". Day and Night magazine. May 5, 2018.
  22. ^ a b c d "Green gold". Vogue. June 16, 2014.
  23. ^ "Gstaad: The Last Resort". New York Times. Retrieved 30 December 2014.
  24. ^ "The Making of The Queen of Kalahari". Vogue. February 5, 2017.
  25. ^ "The queen of diamonds: Caroline Scheufele of Chopard". Business Day: Wanted. November 10, 2017.

External links[edit]