Chris Dorley-Brown

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Chris Dorley-Brown is a British documentary photographer[1] and filmmaker, based in the East End of London.[2]

Since 1984, Dorley-Brown has been creating a photographic archive of the London Borough of Hackney.[3][4] Since 1993 he has collaborated with other people on a variety of projects in radio, print, cinema, television, Internet and architecture.[3]

His photography books include The Longest Way Round (2015),[5] Drivers in the 1980s (2015)[4][6][7][8] and The Corners (2018). His films include BBC in the East End 1958–1973 (2007) and 15 Seconds Part 3 (2015).

Life and work[edit]

Dorley-Brown grew up on the south coast of England.[9] He trained as a silkscreen printer and print finisher after leaving school.[2] Later he joined the photographer Red Saunders' studio as a camera assistant. He went freelance in 1984, creating a photographic archive of the London Borough of Hackney where he lived and worked, which he has continued to do.[3][2][9]

"Largely self-taught, his cultural education was formed in east London in the late seventies, against a backdrop of strongly polarised political conflict and change. His influences are shaped by memory, both personal and those of others."[9]

In 1991, he expanded into filmmaking and other activities associated with burgeoning new technologies.[2][10] Since 1993 Dorley-Brown has collaborated with other people of various creative disciplines, as well as groups and individuals in the public sphere, on a variety of projects in radio, print, cinema, television, Internet and architecture.[3]

Publications[edit]

Publications by Dorley-Brown[edit]

  • The Corners. Self‐published, 2010.
  • Continuum. FusionLab Inc, 2014. Digital photobook for iPad.[11][12]
  • The Longest Way Round. UK: Overlapse, 2015. ISBN 9780994791900.
  • Drivers in the 1980s. East London Photo Stories Book 6. London: Hoxton Mini Press, 2015. ISBN 978-0-9576998-9-2.
  • The Corners. London: Hoxton Mini Press, 2018. ISBN 978-1-910566-32-9.

Publication with others[edit]

  • The Cut. London: Space, 2011. Photographs by Dorley-Brown, Jessie Brennan, and Daniel Lehan. Edited by Dorley-Brown.[13]

Publications edited by Dorley-Brown[edit]

  • The East End in Colour 1960-1980. London: Hoxton Mini Press, 2018. By David Granick. Edited and with an introduction by Dorley-Brown. ISBN 978-1-910566-31-2. Edition of 3000 copies. Second edition; ISBN 978-1-910566-31-2.

Publications with contributions by Dorley-Brown[edit]

  • Scarpe: Moda e Fantasia = Shoes: Fashion and Fantasy. Milan: Rizzoli, 1990. Edited by Colin McDowell and Manolo Blahnik. ISBN 9788817241823. With a preface by Blahnik.
  • Photographers London: 1839-1994. London: Museum of London, 1995. Edited by Mike Seaborne. ISBN 978-0904818505.
  • Future Face: Image, Identity, Innovation. London: Profile; Wellcome Trust; Science Museum, 2003. By Sandra Kemp. ISBN 978-1861977687. With contributions from Vicki Bruce and Alf Linney. Accompanied the Future Face exhibition at the Science Museum, October 2004 – February 2005.[14]
  • Face: The New Photographic Portrait. London: Thames & Hudson, 2004. By William Ewing. ISBN 978-0500287323.
  • Photography Reborn: Image Making in the Digital Era. New York City: Abrams, 2006. Edited by Jonathan Lipkin. ISBN 9780810992443.
  • London Street Photography: 1860–2010. London: Museum of London; Stockport: Dewi Lewis, 2011. ISBN 978-1907893032. Selected from the Museum of London collection by Mike Seaborne and Anna Sparham. Published to accompany an exhibition at the Museum.
  • The Art of Dissent: Adventures in London's Olympic State. Marshgate, 2012. Edited by Hilary Powell and Isaac Marrero-Guillamon. ISBN 978-0957294301.[15] Dorley-Brown contributes journal extracts.
  • The Wick. Issue 3. London: See Studio, 2013. Edited by Marrero-Guillamon. Newspaper with supplement, "Picturing the Wick", by Dorley-Brown and Francesca Weber-Newth.

Films by Dorley-Brown[edit]

Collections[edit]

Dorley-Brown's work is held in the following public collections:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wollaston, Sam (13 April 2015). "On the road, 80s style". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 7 November 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d Juhasz, Brandon (21 March 2016). "Chris Dorley-Brown: Foreign Exchange Winner". Lenscratch. Retrieved 7 November 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d http://www.modrex.com/CV_ChrisDorley-Brown.pdf
  4. ^ a b Williams, Eliza (28 April 2015). "Hackney in the 1980s, captured by Chris Dorley-Brown". Creative Review. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  5. ^ "Secret history: my father's hidden past at the hands of the Nazis – in pictures". The Guardian. London. 4 December 2015. Retrieved 7 November 2017.
  6. ^ Jones, Matt (4 April 2016). "Angry drivers stuck in London traffic during the Eighties". GQ. Retrieved 7 November 2017.
  7. ^ Rosenberg, David (2 June 2015). "Being Stuck in Traffic Never Looked So Good". Slate. Retrieved 7 November 2017.
  8. ^ Gosling, Emily (24 April 2015). "Nostalgia-packed photographs of drivers in the 1980s". It's Nice That. Retrieved 7 November 2017.
  9. ^ a b c "15 Seconds: Part 3 by Chris Dorley-Brown: About". Wellcome Collection. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  10. ^ Millar, Stuart (30 March 2001). "Composite Briton unveiled". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 7 November 2017.
  11. ^ "Continuum: Travel in Time Through Chris Dorley Brown's Photographs of London". Fusionlab. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  12. ^ "Continuum: Travel in Time through Chris Dorley Brown's Photographs of London: Chris Dorley Brown". Apple Inc. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  13. ^ "The Cut: Jessie Brennan, Chris Dorley-Brown and Daniel Lehan". Space. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  14. ^ "Future Face: Image, identity, innovation". Wellcome Collection. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  15. ^ "The Art of Dissent: Adventures in London's Olympic State", Marshgate Press. Accessed 9 November 2017
  16. ^ "Chris Dorley-Brown: BBC in the East End 1958-1973". British Film Institute. Retrieved 7 November 2017.
  17. ^ "Chris Dorley-Brown: Placement at BBC Creative Archive Licence Group". Manchester Metropolitan University / Arts Council England. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  18. ^ "Eastern Promise: An archive of BBC films and a new documentary about Gilbert & George record the changing social fabric of London's East End". frieze. 1 October 2007. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  19. ^ "15 Seconds: Part 3 by Chris Dorley-Brown". Wellcome Collection. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  20. ^ "Pigment Print: Street Scene, Piccadilly, 2009". Museum of London. Retrieved 7 November 2017.
  21. ^ "The longest way round / Chris Dorley-Brown". George Eastman Museum. Retrieved 7 November 2017.

External links[edit]