Clutter (advertising)

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Billboard clutter

Advertising or marketing clutter refers to the large volume of advertising messages that the average consumer is exposed to on a daily basis.

Background[edit]

One explanation, in a general sense, is that advertising clutter is often a result of a marketplace that is (over)-crowded with competing products. Heightened competition from this phenomenon has led to the emergence of other advertising strategies, including guerrilla marketing, viral marketing, and experiential marketing along with new focuses on humanising messaging within marketing.

Online advertising clutter[edit]

Studies have shown that annoyance factors from online advertising clutter is a significant contributor to advertising avoidance.[1][2][3][4]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Digital Advertising: Theory and Research (3rd ed.), Shelly Rodgers, Esther Thorson, PhD (eds.), Routledge (1999, 2007, 2017), pps. 70 & 116; LCCN 2016-43446; OCLC 1101057869; ISBNs 978-1-138-65442-6 (hardcover), 978-1-138-65445-7 (paperback), 978-1-315-62325-2 (ebook), 978-1-317-22545-4,978-1-317-22546-1, 1-3156-2325-0, 1-3172-2545-7, 1-3172-2546-5
  2. ^ "The Function of Format: Consumer Responses to Six On-Line Advertising Formats," by Kelli S. Burns, PhD, and Richard J. Lutz, PhD, Journal of Advertising, Vol. 35, No. 1, Spring 2006, pps. 53–63; OCLC 4646618174; ISSN 0091-3367
  3. ^ "Why Do People Avoid Advertising on the Internet?" by Chang-Hoan Cho & Hongsik John Cheon, Journal of Advertising, Vol. 33, No. 4, 2004; pps. 89–97; OCLC 358842784; ISSN 0091-3367 (accessible via JSTOR at www.jstor.org/stable/4189279)
  4. ^ "Reinquiry into Advertising Avoidance on the Internet: A Conceptual Replication and Extension," by Zahra Seyedghorban, PhD, Hossein Tahernejad, Margaret Jekanyika Matanda, PhD, Journal of Advertising, Vol. 45, No. 1, October 19, 2015, pps. OCLC 6013942665; ISSN 0091-3367

Sources[edit]

  1. "The Persuaders," Frontline, PBS, November 9, 2004; OCLC 1056937285
  2. "Research: Clutter rises, Even In Weak Ad Economy: Study: Nearly 1 in 4 Primetime Minutes in 2001," by Keven Downey, article in Media Life (bygone eMagazine), April 5, 2002; OCLC 46765995 (archival access host: Wayback Machineweb.archive.org)
    Note: The article is a review of "Clutter Watch 2002" (annual survey), Debbie Solomon, senior partner and group research director, Mindshare, April 2001. Mindshare's data used in the survey was culled from Competitive Media Reporting, now owned by the Kantar Group.
  3. "The Real Competition Is Clutter : Marty Neumeier," Humanise The Brand Magazine