Coffee in Portland, Oregon

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Stumptown Coffee Roasters cafe in downtown Portland, Oregon in 2009

Portland, Oregon, in the United States, is known for having an established coffee culture. In February 2012, The New York Times reported that Portland had more than 30 coffee roasters. Comparing Portland's coffee culture to other major cities along the West Coast, Oliver Strand wrote: "Seattle coffee might have more muscle, and San Francisco coffee might have more mystique, but Portland's coffee scene is arguably the country's most intimate. It's also one of the most relaxed."[1]

Roasters[edit]

Some of Portland's roasters include Coava Coffee Roasters, Heart Coffee Roasters, Water Avenue Coffee, Sterling Coffee Roasters and Stumptown Coffee Roasters.[1]

Events[edit]

In 2012, the Specialty Coffee Association of America hosted its annual convention, billed as "the largest coffee industry gathering in the world", at the Oregon Convention Center.[2]

Prevalence[edit]

Portland is noted as a place in which people use coffeehouses as a third place.[3] There is more coffee available in gentrified areas of Portland.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Strand, Oliver (February 10, 2012). "In Portland, Ore., a D.I.Y. Coffee Culture". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved February 3, 2014.  Note: A version of this article appeared in print on February 12, 2012, on page TR4 of the New York edition with the headline: "Portland's Purist Coffee Scene".
  2. ^ House, Kelly (April 13, 2012). "Portland abuzz over hosting coffee's biggest event". The Oregonian. Retrieved February 3, 2014. 
  3. ^ Salvador, T.; Sherry, J. W.; Urrutia, A. E. (2005). "Less cyber, more café: Enhancing existing small businesses across the digital divide with ICTs". Information Technology for Development. 11: 77. doi:10.1002/itdj.20004. 
  4. ^ Monroe Sullivan, D.; Shaw, S. C. (2011). "Retail Gentrification and Race: The Case of Alberta Street in Portland, Oregon". Urban Affairs Review. 47 (3): 413. doi:10.1177/1078087410393472. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]