Conejo Valley Botanic Garden

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Conejo Valley Botanic Garden
Conejo valley botanic garden.jpg
Sign by entrance.
Conejo Valley Botanic Garden is located in California
Conejo Valley Botanic Garden
Conejo Valley Botanic Garden
Conejo Valley Botanic Garden is located in the United States
Conejo Valley Botanic Garden
Conejo Valley Botanic Garden
TypeBotanical garden
LocationThousand Oaks, California, United States
Coordinates34°11′31″N 118°53′09″W / 34.19194°N 118.88583°W / 34.19194; -118.88583Coordinates: 34°11′31″N 118°53′09″W / 34.19194°N 118.88583°W / 34.19194; -118.88583
Area33.6 acres (13.6 ha)
Opened1976
Operated byGregor Medel Foundation
StatusOpen
Websitewww.conejogarden.org

Conejo Valley Botanic Garden is located in Thousand Oaks, California, and consists of a peak with vista views along with fifteen hillside botanical gardens. It lies next to Conejo Valley Community Garden and immediately across the street from Tarantula Hill, the highest point in Thousand Oaks.[1][2][3] It provides a teaching laboratory for what flora works and what does not work in the Conejo Valley.[4]

The 33-acre (13.6 ha) site consists of a vast variety of endemic plants, water-conserving plants, oak trees, as well as indigenous wildlife. A children’s garden area was added in March 2003, known as Kids’ Adventure Garden.[5][6] Although the garden itself keeps open most days, Kids’ Adventure Garden and nursery plant sales are only open on Sundays.[7] Admission to the garden is free.[8]

Although its main entrance is found at 400 West Gainsborough Road,[9][10] it is also accessible from Conejo Community Park, located at the intersection of Hendrix- and Dover Avenues.[11][12][13]

The property was first acquired in 1973, while the first parts of the botanical gardens began to emerge in 1976.[14] It is operated by the non-profit Gregor Medel Foundation.[15]

Overview[edit]

It consists of a plant sanctuary on a hill overlooking the Conejo Valley.[16] The hill contains 15 unique, hillside specialty gardens. It is home to a variety of hiking trails, which interconnect with other paths leading to various overlook points from the hill. The garden’s many hill paths lead past fruit trees, sections of desert, native plants, Mediterranean plants, herbs, and a butterfly garden. The 1-mile Nature Trail follows a creek which descends into a forested, willow- and oak-filled canyon.[17] It is also home of a bird habitat which is a conservation effort to provide sustenance and sheltering environments for birds and other fauna.[18][19]

Management[edit]

A fifty-year lease agreement between the Conejo Valley Botanic Garden Inc. and Conejo Recreation & Park District (CRPD) was signed on October 18, 1973, with gardeners paying $1 annually in rent. A term of the lease requires the garden to not charge for entry. The organization receives no funding from public agencies and remains exclusively dependent on donations.[20]

Specialty Gardens[edit]

Salvia Garden.
Desert Garden.
Herb Garden.
Australian Garden.
Mediterranean Garden.
View from atop the hill.

Its botanical gardens include an Australian garden, a bird habitat, a butterfly garden, an oak tree grove, rare fruit orchard, extensive salvia collections, and more.[21]

Its botanical gardens consist of 15 unique hillside gardens:[22][23]

Furthermore, Trail of Trees exhibits a total of 72 trees, including 50 different tree species. Each tree is labeled with its family-, botanic- and common name, along with country of origin and planting date. Represented are the Golden Trumpet Tree, the national tree of Brazil, as well as Chinese pistache, Tulip tree, Prunus serrulata 'Kanzan', Cockspur coral, American storax, Shoestring acacia, and others.

Garden Trails are found throughout the gardens. Little Loop Trail leads above the creek through Chaparral and around a meadow. The longer 1-mile (1.6 km) Nature Trail follows the creek and descends into a shady, oak-canopied canyon just below the hill with the botanical gardens. After 1/4 mile (0.4 km), steep wooden steps brings the path down into the canyon. After exploring the creek-bed for 1/2 mile (0.8 km), the trail climbs out of the ravine and returns to the main garden area.[28][29]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Philipp, Cathy (1997). On the Trail - Malibu to Santa Barbara. Cathy Philip Pub. Page 107. ISBN 9780965584807.
  2. ^ http://articles.latimes.com/1998/feb/22/travel/tr-21692
  3. ^ McKinney, John (2013). HIKE Ventura County: Best Day Hikes around Ventura, Ojai and the Simi Hills. The Trailmaster, Inc. Pages 82-83.
  4. ^ http://ucanr.edu/sites/vcmg/files/131066.pdf
  5. ^ Weir, Kathie (2001). A Parent's Guide to Los Angeles: Friendly Advice for Touring Los Angeles with Children. Mars Publishing, Inc. Page 90. ISBN 9780967512716.
  6. ^ Tai, Lolly (2006). Designing outdoor environments for children: Landscaping schoolyards, gardens, and playgrounds. McGraw-Hill. Page 323. ISBN 9780071459358.
  7. ^ https://www.toacorn.com/articles/energetic-teens-inject-new-life-into-conejo-botanic-garden/
  8. ^ Russell, John J. and Thomas S. Spencer (2006). Gardens Across America, West of the Mississippi: The American Horticultural Society's Guide to American Public Gardens and Arboreta. Taylor Trade Publishing. Page 94. ISBN 9781461708919.
  9. ^ Popper, Helen (2012). California Native Gardening: A Month-by-Month Guide. University of California Press. Page 196. ISBN 9780520952232.
  10. ^ https://www.toacorn.com/articles/energetic-teens-inject-new-life-into-conejo-botanic-garden/
  11. ^ https://www.toacorn.com/articles/energetic-teens-inject-new-life-into-conejo-botanic-garden/
  12. ^ http://www.conejogarden.org/Directions
  13. ^ http://archive.vcstar.com/news/volunteers-keep-conejo-valley-botanic-garden-tidy-35-years-ep-373872342-352586681.html/
  14. ^ http://www.crpd.org/parkfac/parks/botanicgarden.asp
  15. ^ http://www.crpd.org/parkfac/parks/botanicgarden.asp
  16. ^ https://www.conejovalleyguide.com/welcome/peace-tranquility-and-views-at-the-conejo-valley-botanic-gar.html
  17. ^ Stone, Robert (1998). Day Hikes in Ventura County, California: 43 of the Best. Day Hike Books, Inc. Page 28. ISBN 978-1573420198.
  18. ^ http://www.crpd.org/parkfac/parks/botanicgarden.asp
  19. ^ http://traveltips.usatoday.com/things-kids-conejo-valley-california-102060.html
  20. ^ http://archive.vcstar.com/news/volunteers-keep-conejo-valley-botanic-garden-tidy-35-years-ep-373872342-352586681.html/
  21. ^ Russell, John J. and Thomas S. Spencer (2006). Gardens Across America, West of the Mississippi: The American Horticultural Society's Guide to American Public Gardens and Arboreta. Taylor Trade Publishing. Page 95. ISBN 9781461708919.
  22. ^ http://ucanr.edu/sites/vcmg/files/131066.pdf
  23. ^ http://www.conejogarden.org/Tour
  24. ^ Clebsch, Betsy (1997). A Book of Salvias: Sages for Every Garden. Timber Press. Page 102. ISBN 9780881923698.
  25. ^ http://www.conejogarden.org/sites/default/files/Bulletins/CVBG%20March%20Bulletin%202017-pages%20CORRECTED.pdf
  26. ^ http://www.conejogarden.org/sites/default/files/Bulletins/CVBG%20Newsletter%20Mar%202012.pdf (Page 2)
  27. ^ http://www.conejogarden.org/Panorama
  28. ^ Philipp, Cathy (1997). On the Trail - Malibu to Santa Barbara. Cathy Philip Pub. Pages 105-106. ISBN 9780965584807.
  29. ^ Stone, Robert (2011). Day Hikes Around Ventura County: 116 Great Hikes. Day Hike Books. Pages 204-205. ISBN 978-1573420624.