2018 Cuban parliamentary election

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2018 Cuban parliamentary election

← 2013 11 March 2018 2023 →

All 605 seats in the National Assembly of People's Power
  First party
  Raul-castro-2015 (cropped).jpg
Leader Raúl Castro
Party PCC
Alliance Committees for the Defense of the Revolution
Seats won 605
Seat change Steady[a]

2018 Cuban parliamentary election - selective vote (by province).svg
Shading for the results of the parliamentary election, with darker shading indicating a greater proportion of selective votes.

President of the Council of Ministers before election

Miguel Díaz-Canel
PCC

Elected President of the Council of Ministers

Miguel Díaz-Canel
PCC

Ballot paper used in the election
Coat of arms of Cuba.svg
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Parliamentary elections were held in Cuba on 11 March 2018 to elect members of the National Assembly of People's Power, alongside provincial elections.[citation needed] Prior to the elections, President Raúl Castro declared he would not be seeking a new term, and a new President of the Council of State will be elected by the National Assembly.[1] His deputy, Miguel Díaz-Canel, was subsequently elected as the new president. However, Castro remained the First Secretary of the Communist Party of Cuba, the most senior position in the country.[2]

Electoral system[edit]

All Cuban citizens who are over the age of 18 years, and process full political rights for at least five years prior to the election are eligible to partake within the election.[3] 50% of candidates must be nominated by people from the municipality and elected by direct vote in local assemblies, where people decide who they consider to have the qualities to best represent them.[citation needed] The other 50% of candidates are proposed by nominating assemblies which comprise representatives of workers, youth, women, students, and farmers, as well as members of the Committees for the Defense of the Revolution.[3] The final list of candidates, which corresponds to the number of seats to be filled, is drawn up by the National Candidature Commission taking into account criteria such as candidates' merit, patriotism, ethical values, and revolutionary history.[3]

Voter requirements are set within article 132 of the Cuban constitution. All voters must be Cuban citizens who have reached the age of 16 years, who have not been declared mentally disabled by a court, and who have not committed a crime.[4] The electoral system is designed to give the winner of the election a majority. To be declared elected, one candidate must obtain more than 50% of the valid votes cast in the constituency in which they are running. If this is not attained, the seat in question remains vacant unless the Council of State decides to hold a second round of voting.[3]

Results[edit]

On 12 March, the Cuba National Election Commission (CNE) released preliminary results.[5] In a press conference, the CNE reported that all 605 candidates had been elected as Deputies to the National Assembly.[5]

Option Votes % Seats
Full list 5,620,713 80.44 605
Selective vote 1,366,328 19.56
Invalid/blank votes 412,850
Total 7,399,891 100 605
Registered voters/turnout 8,639,989 85.65
Source: Granma[6]

Results by province[edit]

Province Registered
voters
Votes cast Valid votes Blank Invalid Full list Selective votes
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
Pinar del Río 452,557 406,119 89.74 379,920 93.55 23,006 5.66 3,193 0.79 305,462 80.40 74,458 19.60
Artemisa 393,143 350,063 89.04 324,559 92.71 18,907 5.40 6,597 1.88 255,543 78.74 69,016 21.26
La Habana 1,685,651 1,339,335 79.46 1,249,381 93.28 59,786 4.46 30,168 2.25 927,031 74.20 322,350 25.80
Mayabeque 296,126 268,505 90.67 250,362 93.24 12,775 4.76 5,368 2.00 204,511 81.69 45,851 18.31
Matanzas 561,179 475,331 84.70 451,222 94.93 17,920 3.77 6,189 1.30 346,461 76.78 104,761 23.22
Villa Clara 611,358 534,310 87.40 501,251 93.81 25,839 4.84 7,220 1.35 411,103 82.02 90,148 17.98
Cienfuegos 311,355 267,999 86.08 248,235 92.63 15,199 5.67 4,565 1.70 190,965 76.93 57,270 23.07
Sancti Spíritus 366,885 327,047 89.14 310,411 94.91 13,418 4.10 3,218 0.98 257,337 82.90 53,074 17.10
Ciego de Ávila 337,785 287,988 85.26 272,968 94.78 12,130 4.21 2,890 1.00 218,873 80.18 54,095 19.82
Camagüey 591,944 504,258 85.19 481,600 95.51 17,989 3.57 4,669 0.93 375,618 77.99 105,982 22.01
Las Tunas 404,948 353,654 87.33 337,536 95.44 13,430 3.80 2,688 0.76 283,174 83.89 54,362 16.11
Holguín 785,047 668,636 85.17 625,983 93.62 36,099 5.40 6,554 0.98 529,379 84.57 96,604 15.43
Granma 629,155 555,399 88.28 529,381 95.32 21,680 3.90 4,338 0.78 461,487 87.17 67,894 12.83
Santiago de Cuba 781,000 683,462 87.51 660,473 96.64 19,966 2.92 3,023 0.44 554,642 83.98 105,831 16.02
Guantánamo 368,864 321,155 87.07 309,834 96.47 9,559 2.98 1,762 0.55 256,748 82.87 53,086 17.13
Isla de la Juventud 62,992 56,630 89.90 53,925 95.22 2,253 3.98 452 0.80 42,379 78.59 11,546 21.41
Total 8,639,989 7,399,891 85.65 6,987,041 94.42 319,956 4.32 92,894 1.26 5,620,713 80.44 1,366,328 19.56
Source: Granma[7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Notional figure from previous election, since the number of deputies in the National Assembly was reduced by seven

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Castro to stand down in 2018". Retrieved 2016-09-06.
  2. ^ "Raul Castro to lead Cuba's Communist Party until 2021". FRANCE 24. 19 April 2018. "I confirm to this assembly that Raul Castro, as first secretary of the Communist Party, will lead the decisions about the future of the country," Diaz-Canel said.
  3. ^ a b c d Union, Inter-Parliamentary. "IPU PARLINE database: CUBA (Asamblea nacional del Poder popular), Electoral system". archive.ipu.org. Retrieved 2018-04-13.
  4. ^ "Cuban Constitution" (PDF).
  5. ^ a b Redacción Digital (2018-03-12). "National Electoral Commission releases preliminary data › Cuba › Granma - Official voice of the PCC". En.granma.cu. Retrieved 2018-04-20.
  6. ^ http://www.granma.cu/file/pdf/2018/03/19/G_2018031905.pdf
  7. ^ "El voto de Cuba socialista" (PDF). Granma (in Spanish). 19 March 2018. Archived from the original (PDF) on 18 April 2018. Retrieved 19 April 2018.