Don Casey

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Lawrence Donald Casey (born June 17, 1937)[1] is a former professional and collegiate basketball coach. He has coached two National Basketball Association (NBA) teams, the Los Angeles Clippers and the New Jersey Nets—each for a season and a half. He had previously coached the Temple Owls from 1973 to 1982. He also worked as an assistant coach with the Chicago Bulls (1982–83) and Boston Celtics (1990–1996).[2][3]

Casey grew up in Collingswood, New Jersey. As a young man in the 1960s, Casey coached at Bishop Eustace Preparatory School in Pennsauken Township, New Jersey, where he was recommended for a job as a JV coach by a friend and took over the varsity squad after the coach left the job. His coaching led to two state championships. Casey coached Bill Melchionni, a high school and college great who eventually played in the pros in the late 1960s with the ABA New York Nets and Philadelphia 76ers.[4]

In his first season as Temple head coach, Don Casey had his team stall with the basketball in the finals of the Volunteer Classic against Tennessee. The final score of the game was Tennessee 11, Temple 6, the lowest scoring major college basketball game since 1938. [5]

As of February 2006, Casey is the vice-chairman of the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, and As of October 24, 2006, Casey is the head coach of the Hollywood Fame of the American Basketball Association's 21st century incarnation.

References[edit]

  1. ^ A Biographical Directory of Professional Basketball Coaches
  2. ^ https://www.basketball-reference.com/coaches/caseybo99c.html
  3. ^ https://www.sports-reference.com/cbb/coaches/don-casey-1.html
  4. ^ Howard-Cooper, Scott. "SWITCHING TRACKS : Don Casey Brings New Train of Thought to Clippers", Los Angeles Times, January 26, 1989. Accessed October 2, 2017. "He got into coaching almost by accident, taking charge of the junior varsity team at Bishop Eustace Prep in Pennsauken, N.J., as a part-time job at the suggestion of a friend. Midway through the season, the varsity coach quit, and Casey, then 21, was promoted. At a school that didn't even have its own gym when he started, Bishop Eustace won 2 state championships in 6 years."
  5. ^ http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=darcy/060203

External links[edit]