Episcopal Peace Fellowship

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Episcopal Peace Fellowship
AbbreviationEPF
FormationNovember 11, 1939; 79 years ago (1939-11-11)
Founded atNew York City, New York, US
Executive Director
Melanie Merkle Atha[1]
Chair
The Reverend Bob Davidson[2]
Websiteepfnational.org
Formerly called
Episcopal Pacifist Fellowship

The Episcopal Peace Fellowship (EPF) is an American peace organization composed of members of the Episcopal Church. It was founded in New York City on November 11, 1939, as the Episcopal Pacifist Fellowship by John Nevin Sayre, Walter Russell Bowie, Elmore McKee, Eric M. Tasman, Luke White, Katharine Pierce, William Appleton Lawrence, Walter Mitchell, and Paul Jones[3] with the mission to pray, study and work for peace.[citation needed] It adopted its current name in 1965.[4]

The EPF has a national office with a small paid staff, and many local chapters (71 as of January 2009). It urges the broader Episcopal Church, other organizations and people in general to adopt a more peaceful stance on issues such as the Iraq War, Iran, promoting peace in the broader Middle East, nuclear weapons, and Cuba. It offers Active Nonviolence Training, takes part in peace demonstrations, helps organize action groups, and awards peace prizes to individuals around the world who strive for peace.

It is a sister organization of the Anglican Pacifist Fellowship.

References[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "About". Episcopal Peace Fellowship. Retrieved May 4, 2019.
  2. ^ "EPF's National Executive Council". Episcopal Peace Fellowship. Retrieved February 20, 2019.
  3. ^ Armentrout & Slocum 2000, p. 181; Hein & Shattuck 2004, p. 118.
  4. ^ Armentrout & Slocum 2000, p. 181.

Bibliography[edit]

Armentrout, Don S.; Slocum, Robert Boak, eds. (2000). An Episcopal Dictionary of the Church: A User-Friendly Reference for Episcopalians. New York: Church Publishing. ISBN 978-0-89869-701-8.
Hein, David; Shattuck, Gardiner H., Jr. (2004). The Episcopalians. New York: Church Publishing. ISBN 978-0-89869-497-0.

Further reading[edit]

Pierce, Nathaniel W.; Ward, Paul L. (1989). The Voice of Conscience: A Loud and Unusual Noise? The Episcopal Peace Fellowship, 1939–1989. Washington: The Fellowship. OCLC 21079289.

External links[edit]